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1.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
2.

Chronic lymphatic leukemia

A chronic lymphocytic/lymphatic/lymphoblastic leukemia (CLL) is a neoplastic disease characterized by proliferation and accumulation (blood, marrow and lymphoid organs) of morphologically mature but immunologically dysfunctional lymphocytes. A CLL is always a B-cell lymphocytic leukemia as there are no reports of cases of T-cell lymphocytic leukemias. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505830
Concept ID:
CN004916
Finding
3.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common neoplasia of B lymphocytes in which these cells progressively accumulate in the bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissues. The clinical evolution of the disorder is heterogeneous, with some patients having indolent disease and others having aggressive disease and short survival (summary by Quesada et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Susceptibility loci have been mapped to chromosomes 11p11 (CLLS1; 609630) and 13q14 (CLLS2; 109543) by genomewide linkage analysis and translocation studies, respectively. Susceptibility mapping to chromosome 9q34 (CLLS3; 612557) is associated with downregulation of the DAPK1 gene (600831). Genomewide association studies have identified susceptibility loci on chromosomes 6p25.3 (CLLS4; 612558) and 11q24.1 (CLLS5; 612559). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44120
Concept ID:
C0023434
Neoplastic Process
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