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Items: 1 to 20 of 26

1.

Neuroectodermal neoplasm

A neoplasm arising in the neuroectoderm, the portion of the ectoderm of the early embryo that gives rise to the central and peripheral nervous systems, including some glial cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
60072
Concept ID:
C0206093
Neoplastic Process
2.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
3.

Neoplasms

MedGen UID:
880980
Concept ID:
CN236628
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Sarcoma

Your soft tissues connect, support, or surround other tissues. Examples include your muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There are many kinds, based on the type of tissue they started in. They may cause a lump or swelling in the soft tissue. Sometimes they spread and can press on nerves and organs, causing problems such as pain or trouble breathing. No one knows exactly what causes these cancers. They are not common, but you have a higher risk if you have been exposed to certain chemicals, have had radiation therapy, or have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove the tumor, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
224714
Concept ID:
C1261473
Neoplastic Process
6.

Medulloepithelioma

A primitive neuroectodermal tumor that originates from the cells of the embryonic medullary canal. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
87272
Concept ID:
C0334596
Neoplastic Process
7.

Embryonal neoplasm

new abnormal embryonic tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
45034
Concept ID:
C0027654
Neoplastic Process
8.

Medulloblastoma

Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children. It accounts for 16% of all pediatric brain tumors, and 40% of all cerebellar tumors in childhood are medulloblastoma. Medulloblastoma occurs bimodally, with peak incidences between 3 and 4 years and 8 and 9 years of age. Approximately 10 to 15% of medulloblastomas are diagnosed in infancy. Medulloblastoma accounts for less than 1% of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in adults, with highest incidence in adults 20 to 34 years of age. In 1 to 2% of patients, medulloblastoma is associated with Gorlin syndrome (109400), a nevoid basal carcinoma syndrome. Medulloblastoma also occurs in up to 40% of patients with Turcot syndrome (276300). Medulloblastoma is thought to arise from neural stem cell precursors in the granular cell layer of the cerebellum. Standard treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, and, depending on the age of the patient, radiation therapy (Crawford et al., 2007). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7517
Concept ID:
C0025149
Neoplastic Process
9.

Ewing sarcoma

A malignant tumor of the bone which always arises in the medullary tissue, occurring more often in cylindrical bones. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506718
Concept ID:
CN168774
Finding
10.

Sarcoma

A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas are the main types of sarcoma. Sarcoma is usually highly malignant. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506452
Concept ID:
CN117138
Finding
11.

Medulloblastoma

A rapidly growing embryonic tumor arising in the posterior part of the cerebellar vermis and neuroepithelial roof of the fourth ventricle in children. More rarely, medulloblastoma arises in the cerebellum in adults. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505388
Concept ID:
CN002609
Finding
12.

Wilms tumor 1

Aniridia is characterized by complete or partial iris hypoplasia usually (but not always) with associated foveal hypoplasia resulting in reduced visual acuity and nystagmus presenting in early infancy. Frequently associated ocular abnormalities (often of later onset) include cataract, glaucoma, and corneal opacification and vascularization. Aniridia may occur either as an isolated ocular abnormality without systemic involvement, caused by mutation of PAX6 or deletion of a regulatory region controlling its expression, or as part of the Wilms tumor-aniridia-genital anomalies-retardation (WAGR) syndrome, with a deletion of 11p13 involving the PAX6 (aniridia) locus and the adjacent WT1 (Wilms tumor) locus. Individuals with deletion of PAX6 and WT1 are at up to a 50% risk of developing Wilms tumor. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
447509
Concept ID:
CN033288
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Neuroblastic tumors

A group of nervous system tumors which display neuronal differentiation. It includes tumors that are composed of immature round cells and tumors that display advanced differentiation and the formation of ganglion cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
233228
Concept ID:
C1334953
Neoplastic Process
14.

Neoplasm

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Finding; Neoplastic Process
15.

Ewing sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a cancerous tumor that occurs in bones or soft tissues, such as cartilage or nerves. There are several types of Ewing sarcoma, including Ewing sarcoma of bone, extraosseous Ewing sarcoma, peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET), and Askin tumor. These tumors are considered to be related because they have similar genetic causes. These types of Ewing sarcoma can be distinguished from one another by the tissue in which the tumor develops. Approximately 87 percent of Ewing sarcomas are Ewing sarcoma of bone, which is a bone tumor that usually occurs in the thigh bones (femurs), pelvis, ribs, or shoulder blades. Extraosseous (or extraskeletal) Ewing sarcoma describes tumors in the soft tissues around bones, such as cartilage. pPNETs occur in nerve tissue and can be found in many parts of the body. A type of pPNET found in the chest is called Askin tumor.Ewing sarcomas most often occur in children and young adults. Affected individuals usually feel stiffness, pain, swelling, or tenderness of the bone or surrounding tissue. Sometimes, there is a lump near the surface of the skin that feels warm and soft to the touch. Often, children have a fever that does not go away. Ewing sarcoma of bone can cause weakening of the involved bone, and affected individuals may have a broken bone with no obvious cause.It is common for Ewing sarcoma to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize), usually to the lungs, to other bones, or to the bone marrow.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
107816
Concept ID:
C0553580
Neoplastic Process
16.

Nephroblastoma

Wilms tumor is a rare type of kidney cancer. It causes a tumor on one or both kidneys. It usually affects children, but can happen in adults. Having certain genetic conditions or birth defects can increase the risk of getting it. Children that are at risk should be screened for Wilms tumor every three months until they turn eight. Symptoms include a lump in the abdomen, blood in the urine, and a fever for no reason. Tests that examine the kidney and blood are used to find the tumor. Doctors usually diagnose and remove the tumor in surgery. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation and biologic therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10221
Concept ID:
C0027708
Neoplastic Process
17.

Peripheral neuroepithelioma

MedGen UID:
483352
Concept ID:
C3489398
Neoplastic Process
18.

Ependymoblastoma

A rare type of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) that usually occurs in young children under the age of 2 and is histologically distinguished by the production of ependymoblastic rosettes. It is associated with an aggressive course and a poor prognosis. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
152150
Concept ID:
C0700367
Neoplastic Process
19.

Peripheral neuroepithelioma

The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (primitive neuroectodermal tumors; PNET) comprise morphologically heterogeneous tumors that are characterized by nonrandom chromosomal translocations involving the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 and one of several members of the ETS family of transcription factors. The tumors include Ewing sarcoma, peripheral neuroepithelioma, and Askin tumor. In approximately 90% of cases of ESFT, the FLI1 gene (193067) on chromosome 11 is the fusion partner of EWS; in approximately 10%, the EWS fusion partner is the ERG gene (165080) on chromosome 22. Many other ETS family members have been identified as fusion partners of EWS, but these cases are rare (Khoury, 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
151926
Concept ID:
C0684337
Neoplastic Process
20.

Primitive neuroectodermal tumor

An aggressive malignant embryonal neoplasm arising from the central nervous system. This category includes ependymoblastoma, medulloepithelioma, and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor. It usually follows an aggressive clinical course. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
64627
Concept ID:
C0206663
Neoplastic Process
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