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1.

Base Pairing

Interacting selectively and non-covalently with nucleic acid via hydrogen bonds between the bases of a gene product molecule and the bases of a target nucleic acid molecule. [GOC:krc] [from GO]

MedGen UID:
108706
Concept ID:
C0600436
Molecular Function
2.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
3.

Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive

An advanced phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia. It is characterized by: 1. the presence of blasts in the peripheral blood or bone marrow that are at least 20% of the peripheral blood white cells or of the nucleated cells in the bone marrow respectively, or 2. an extramedullary proliferation of blasts, and/or 3. when there are large aggregates and clusters of blasts in the bone marrow biopsy specimen (adapted from WHO, 2001). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2281
Concept ID:
C0005699
Neoplastic Process
4.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
5.

Crisis

MedGen UID:
533658
Concept ID:
C0231224
Finding
6.

Chronic myelogenous leukemia

A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased proliferation of the granulocytic cell line without the loss of their capacity to differentiate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505815
Concept ID:
CN004875
Finding
7.

Chronic

Slow, creeping onset, slow progress and long continuance of disease manifestations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
Temporal Concept
8.

Heterogeneous

The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67020
Concept ID:
C0242960
Organism Attribute
9.

Chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia is a slow-growing cancer of the blood-forming tissue (bone marrow). Normal bone marrow produces red blood cells (erythrocytes) that carry oxygen, white blood cells (leukocytes) that protect the body from infection, and platelets (thrombocytes) that are involved in blood clotting. In chronic myeloid leukemia, the bone marrow produces too many white blood cells. Initially, these cells function relatively normally. However, as the condition progresses, immature white blood cells called myeloblasts (or blasts) accumulate in the blood and bone marrow. The overgrowth of myeloblasts impairs development of other blood cells, leading to a shortage of red blood cells (anemia) and platelets.Chronic myeloid leukemia usually begins after age 60. Common features include excessive tiredness (fatigue), fever, and weight loss. Many affected individuals develop an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly), which can cause a feeling of fullness in the abdomen and a loss of appetite. About half of people with chronic myeloid leukemia do not initially have any signs and symptoms and are diagnosed when a blood test is performed for another reason.The condition consists of three phases: the chronic phase, the accelerated phase, and the blast phase (or blast crisis). In the chronic phase, the number of mature white blood cells is elevated, and myeloblasts account for less than 10 percent of blood cells. Signs and symptoms of the condition during this phase are typically mild or absent and worsen slowly. The chronic phase can last from months to years. In the accelerated phase, the number of myeloblasts is slightly higher, making up 10 to 29 percent of blood cells. The signs and symptoms continue to worsen. The accelerated phase usually lasts 4 to 6 months, although it is skipped in some affected individuals. In blast crisis, 30 percent or more of blood or bone marrow cells are myeloblasts. Signs and symptoms are most severe in this phase, including a massively enlarged spleen, bone pain, and weight loss. Serious infections and uncontrolled bleeding can be life-threatening.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
7321
Concept ID:
C0023473
Neoplastic Process
10.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
11.

Abetalipoproteinaemia

Abetalipoproteinemia and familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FBHL; 615558) are rare diseases characterized by hypocholesterolemia and malabsorption of lipid-soluble vitamins leading to retinal degeneration, neuropathy, and coagulopathy. Hepatic steatosis is also common. The root cause of both disorders is improper packaging and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing particles. Obligate heterozygous parents of ABL patients usually have normal lipids consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance, whereas obligate heterozygous parents of FBHL patients typically have half normal levels of apoB-containing lipoproteins consistent with autosomal codominant inheritance (summary by Lee and Hegele, 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1253
Concept ID:
C0000744
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Carcinogenesis

The process by which normal cells are transformed into cancer cells. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
154544
Concept ID:
C0596263
Neoplastic Process
13.

Neoplastic Processes

The pathological mechanisms and forms taken by tissue during degeneration into a neoplasm and its subsequent activity. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14325
Concept ID:
C0027671
Neoplastic Process
14.

Neoplasms by Histologic Type

A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10295
Concept ID:
C0027652
Neoplastic Process
15.

Myeloproliferative disorder

Proliferation (excess production) of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
10147
Concept ID:
C0027022
Neoplastic Process
16.

Chronic Monocytic Leukemia

MedGen UID:
9729
Concept ID:
C0023466
Neoplastic Process
17.

Myeloid leukemia

A leukemia that originates from a myeloid cell, that is the blood forming cells of the bone marrow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7320
Concept ID:
C0023470
Neoplastic Process
18.

Hemic and Lymphatic Diseases

Hematologic diseases and diseases of the lymphatic system collectively. Hemic diseases include disorders involving the formed elements (e.g., ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION, INTRAVASCULAR) and chemical components (e.g., BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS); lymphatic diseases include disorders relating to lymph, lymph nodes, and lymphocytes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6780
Concept ID:
C0018981
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Hematologic disease

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet. Types of blood disorders include. -Platelet disorders, excessive clotting, and bleeding problems, which affect how your blood clots. -Anemia, which happens when your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. -Cancers of the blood, such as leukemia and myeloma. -Eosinophilic disorders, which are problems with one type of white blood cell.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5483
Concept ID:
C0018939
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Tumorigenesis

A pathologic process that involves the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state and resulting in polyclonal or monoclonal neoplastic cell proliferation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3302
Concept ID:
C0007621
Neoplastic Process
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