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Hypospadias

MedGen UID:
305577
Concept ID:
C1691215
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Hypospadia
SNOMED CT: Urethral meatus underneath penis (204888000); Hypospadias, penile (204888000)
 
HPO: HP:0000047

Definition

Abnormal position of urethral meatus on the ventral penile shaft (underside) characterized by displacement of the urethral meatus from the tip of the glans penis to the ventral surface of the penis, scrotum, or perineum. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Imperforate anus
MedGen UID:
1997
Concept ID:
C0003466
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality characterized by the persistence of the anal membrane, resulting in a thin membrane covering the normal ANAL CANAL. Imperforation is not always complete and is treated by surgery in infancy. This defect is often associated with NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; MENTAL RETARDATION; and DOWN SYNDROME.
5p partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
41345
Concept ID:
C0010314
Disease or Syndrome
Cri-du-chat syndrome was first described by Lejeune et al. (1963) as a hereditary congenital syndrome associated with deletion of part of the short arm of chromosome 5. The deletions can vary in size from extremely small and involving only band 5p15.2 to the entire short arm. Although the majority of deletions arise as new mutations, approximately 12% result from unbalanced segregation of translocations or recombination involving a pericentric inversion in one of the parents.
Chondroectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
8584
Concept ID:
C0013903
Disease or Syndrome
Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, and dysplastic nails and teeth. Congenital cardiac defects, most commonly a defect of primary atrial septation producing a common atrium, occur in 60% of affected individuals (summary by Ruiz-Perez et al., 2000). The clinical features of the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome appear to be identical regardless of whether the disorder is caused by mutation in the EVC gene (604831) or in the EVC2 gene (607261) (Ruiz-Perez et al., 2003, Galdzicka et al., 2002).
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome
MedGen UID:
48517
Concept ID:
C0035934
Disease or Syndrome
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, broad and often angulated thumbs and great toes, short stature, and moderate to severe intellectual disability. The characteristic craniofacial features are downslanted palpebral fissures, low hanging columella, high palate, grimacing smile, and talon cusps. Prenatal growth is often normal; however, height, weight, and head circumference percentiles rapidly drop in the first few months of life. Obesity may occur in childhood or adolescence. IQ scores range from 25 to 79; average IQ is between 36 and 51. Other variable findings are coloboma, cataract, congenital heart defects, renal abnormalities, and cryptorchidism.
Zellweger syndrome
MedGen UID:
21958
Concept ID:
C0043459
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe to mild. While individual phenotypes (e.g., Zellweger syndrome [ZS], neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy [NALD], and infantile Refsum disease [IRD]) were described in the past before the biochemical and molecular bases of this spectrum were fully determined, the term ZSD is now used to refer to all individuals with a PEX gene defect regardless of phenotype. Individuals with ZSD usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. Affected newborns are hypotonic and feed poorly. They have distinctive facies, congenital malformations (neuronal migration defects associated with neonatal-onset seizures, renal cysts, and bony stippling [chondrodysplasia punctata] of the patella[e] and other long bones), and liver disease which can be severe. Infants with severe ZSD are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Individuals with intermediate/milder ZSD do not have congenital malformations, but rather progressive peroxisome dysfunction variably manifest as sensory loss (secondary to retinal dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss); neurologic involvement (ataxia, polyneuropathy, and leukodystrophy); liver dysfunction; adrenal insufficiency; and renal oxalate stones. While hypotonia and developmental delays are typical, intellect can be normal. Some have osteopenia; almost all have ameleogenesis imperfecta in the secondary teeth.
Male hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
57480
Concept ID:
C0151721
Disease or Syndrome
Familial male hypogonadism is a highly heterogeneous category from which some disorders such as Reifenstein syndrome (312300), Kallmann syndrome (see 308700), isolated gonadotropin deficiency, and some other entities can be separated. The presence of an autosomal recessive form is suggested by the occurrence of parental consanguinity (Nowakowski and Lenz, 1961).
Dubowitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
59797
Concept ID:
C0175691
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, autosomal recessive inherited syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, and a small, round, triangular shaped face with a pointed, receding chin, a broad, wide-tipped nose, and wide-set eyes with drooping eyelids.
Johanson-Blizzard syndrome
MedGen UID:
59798
Concept ID:
C0175692
Disease or Syndrome
Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that progresses from acute (sudden onset; duration <6 months) to recurrent acute (>1 episode of acute pancreatitis) to chronic (duration >6 months). The range of symptoms and disease course vary from person to person. Familial pancreatitis, defined as pancreatitis from any cause that occurs in a family with an incidence that is greater than would be expected by chance alone, can be non-genetic or genetic, the latter including autosomal dominant hereditary pancreatitis and pancreatitis syndromes characterized by pancreatitis or pancreatic insufficiency. The majority of familial pancreatitis appears to have a complex, multigenic, or gene-environmental etiology with a variable number of germline pathogenic variants in genes that affect trypsin regulation, including CASR, CTRC, and CLDN2. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is defined as either two or more individuals with pancreatitis in two or more generations of a family (i.e., an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance) or pancreatitis associated with a germline PRSS1 disease-causing gain-of-function variant. The phenotype of hereditary pancreatitis is increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, with complications such as chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and chronic pain in some affected individuals. Heterozygous pathogenic variants in PRSS1 are found in 60%-100% of families with hereditary pancreatitis, and most large families with pancreatitis spanning multiple generations; biallelic pathogenic variants in SPINK1 or biallelic pathogenic variants in CFTR result in autosomal recessive pancreatitis. Syndromes in which pancreatitis is a finding include: Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome, CEL maturity-onset diabetes of the young (CEL-MODY), and Johanson-Blizzard syndrome. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder, includes pancreatic exocrine insufficiency as well as other features. Idiopathic sporadic pancreatitis is a single occurrence of pancreatitis in a family for which no etiology is identified.
Russell-Silver syndrome
MedGen UID:
104492
Concept ID:
C0175693
Disease or Syndrome
Russell-Silver syndrome (RSS) is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation accompanied by postnatal growth deficiency. The birth weight of affected infants is typically two or more SD below the mean, and postnatal growth two or more SD below the mean for length or height. Affected individuals typically have proportionately short stature, normal head circumference, fifth-finger clinodactyly, typical facial features with triangular facies characterized by broad forehead and narrow chin, and limb-length asymmetry that may result from hemihypotrophy with diminished growth of the affected side. Growth velocity is normal in children with RSS. The average adult height of males is 151.2 cm and that of females is 139.9 cm. Evidence exists that children with RSS are at significant risk for developmental delay (both motor and cognitive) and learning disabilities.
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
61231
Concept ID:
C0175694
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a congenital multiple anomaly syndrome caused by an abnormality in cholesterol metabolism resulting from deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase. It is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and multiple major and minor malformations. The malformations include distinctive facial features, cleft palate, cardiac defects, underdeveloped external genitalia in males, postaxial polydactyly, and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes. The clinical spectrum is wide and individuals have been described with normal development and only minor malformations.
Opitz-Frias syndrome
MedGen UID:
104493
Concept ID:
C0175696
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome (X-OS) is a multiple-congenital-anomaly disorder characterized by facial anomalies (hypertelorism, prominent forehead, widow's peak, broad nasal bridge, anteverted nares), genitourinary abnormalities (hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and hypoplastic/bifid scrotum), and laryngotracheoesophageal defects. Developmental delay and intellectual disability are observed in about 50% of affected males. Cleft lip and/or palate are present in approximately 50% of affected individuals. Other malformations (present in <50% of individuals) include congenital heart defects, imperforate or ectopic anus, and midline brain defects (Dandy-Walker malformation and agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and/or cerebellar vermis). Wide clinical variability occurs even among members of the same family. Female heterozygotes usually manifest hypertelorism only.
Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines
MedGen UID:
104494
Concept ID:
C0175704
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) is a condition in which the cardinal features consist of lentigines, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, short stature, pectus deformity, and dysmorphic facial features, including widely spaced eyes and ptosis. Multiple lentigines present as dispersed flat, black-brown macules, mostly on the face, neck and upper part of the trunk with sparing of the mucosa. In general, lentigines do not appear until age four to five years but then increase to the thousands by puberty. Some individuals with NSML do not exhibit lentigines. Approximately 85% of affected individuals have heart defects, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) (typically appearing during infancy and sometimes progressive) and pulmonary valve stenosis. Postnatal growth retardation resulting in short stature occurs in fewer than 50% of affected persons, although most affected individuals have a height that is less than the 25th percentile for age. Sensorineural hearing deficits, present in approximately 20%, are poorly characterized. Intellectual disability, typically mild, is observed in approximately 30% of persons with NSML.
VATER association
MedGen UID:
67396
Concept ID:
C0220708
Disease or Syndrome
VATER is a mnemonically useful acronym for the nonrandom association of vertebral defects (V), anal atresia (A), tracheoesophageal fistula with esophageal atresia (TE), and radial or renal dysplasia (R). This combination of associated defects was pointed out by Quan and Smith (1972). Nearly all cases have been sporadic. VACTERL is an acronym for an expanded definition of the association that includes cardiac malformations (C) and limb anomalies (L). The VACTERL association is a spectrum of various combinations of its 6 components, which can be a manifestation of several recognized disorders rather than a distinct anatomic or etiologic entity (Khoury et al., 1983). Also see VATER/VACTERL association with hydrocephalus (VACTERL-H; 276950) and VACTERL with or without hydrocephalus (VACTERLX; 314390).
Fryns syndrome
MedGen UID:
65088
Concept ID:
C0220730
Disease or Syndrome
Fryns syndrome is characterized by diaphragmatic defects (diaphragmatic hernia, eventration, hypoplasia or agenesis); characteristic facial appearance (coarse facies, ocular hypertelorism, broad and flat nasal bridge, thick nasal tip, long philtrum, low-set and poorly formed ears, tented upper lip, macrostomia, micrognathia); distal digital hypoplasia (nails, terminal phalanges); pulmonary hypoplasia; and associated anomalies (polyhydramnios, cloudy corneas and/or microphthalmia, orofacial clefting, renal dysplasia/renal cortical cysts, and/or malformations involving the brain, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitalia). Survival beyond the neonatal period has been rare. Data on postnatal growth and psychomotor development are limited; however, severe developmental delay and intellectual disability are common.
Craniofrontonasal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
65095
Concept ID:
C0220767
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofrontonasal syndrome is an X-linked developmental disorder that shows paradoxically greater severity in heterozygous females than in hemizygous males. Females have frontonasal dysplasia, craniofacial asymmetry, craniosynostosis, bifid nasal tip, grooved nails, wiry hair, and abnormalities of the thoracic skeleton, whereas males typically show only hypertelorism (Twigg et al., 2004; Wieland et al., 2004).
FG syndrome
MedGen UID:
113106
Concept ID:
C0220769
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of MED12-related disorders, which is still being defined, includes at a minimum the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), and X-linked Ohdo syndrome. FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. X-linked Ohdo syndrome (referred to as XLOS in this GeneReview) is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. A number of individuals with nonsyndromic intellectual disability – including some affected females – have been described.
Seckel syndrome
MedGen UID:
78534
Concept ID:
C0265202
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive inherited syndrome caused by mutations in the ATR gene, RBBP8 gene, CENPJ gene, CEP152 gene, CEP63 gene, NIN gene, DNA2 gene, or TRAIP gene. It is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, dwarfism, microcephaly, mental retardation, and a "bird-headed" facial appearance.
Cryptophthalmos syndrome
MedGen UID:
82692
Concept ID:
C0265233
Disease or Syndrome
Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Fraser Syndrome Fraser syndrome-2 (FRASRS2) is caused by mutation in the FREM2 gene (608945) on chromosome 13q13, and Fraser syndrome-3 (FRASRS3) is caused by mutation in the GRIP1 gene (604597) on chromosome 12q14. See Bowen syndrome (211200) for a comparable but probably distinct syndrome of multiple congenital malformations.
Townes syndrome
MedGen UID:
75555
Concept ID:
C0265246
Disease or Syndrome
Townes-Brocks syndrome is a genetic condition that affects several parts of the body. The most common features of this condition are an obstruction of the anal opening (imperforate anus), abnormally shaped ears, and hand malformations that most often affect the thumb. Most people with this condition have at least two of these three major features.Other possible signs and symptoms of Townes-Brocks syndrome include kidney abnormalities, mild to profound hearing loss, heart defects, and genital malformations. These features vary among affected individuals, even within the same family. Intellectual disability or learning problems have also been reported in about 10 percent of people with Townes-Brocks syndrome.
Multiple pterygium syndrome Escobar type
MedGen UID:
82696
Concept ID:
C0265261
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple pterygium syndromes comprise a group of multiple congenital anomaly disorders characterized by webbing (pterygia) of the neck, elbows, and/or knees and joint contractures (arthrogryposis) (Morgan et al., 2006). The multiple pterygium syndromes are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous but are traditionally divided into prenatally lethal (253290) and nonlethal (Escobar) types.
Coffin-Siris syndrome
MedGen UID:
75565
Concept ID:
C0265338
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome is a multiple malformation syndrome characterized by mental retardation associated with coarse facial features, hypertrichosis, sparse scalp hair, and hypoplastic or absent fifth fingernails or toenails. Other more variable features may include poor overall growth, craniofacial abnormalities, spinal anomalies, and congenital heart defects (review by Vergano and Deardorff, 2014). Mutations in the ARID1B gene are the most common cause of Coffin-Siris syndrome (Wieczorek et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris Syndrome Forms of Coffin-Siris syndrome have been shown to be caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF complex, also known as the BAF complex, which functions as a chromatin remodeling factor. These include CSS2 (614607), caused by mutation in the ARID1A gene (603024); CSS3 (614608), caused by mutation in the SMARCB1 gene (601607); CSS4 (614609), caused by mutation in the SMARCA4 gene (603254); CSS5 (616938), caused by mutation in the SMARCE1 gene (603111); and CSS6 (617808), caused by mutation in the ARID2 gene (609539). A similar phenotype, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS; 601358), is also caused by mutation in a subunit of this complex, i.e., SMARCA2 (600014).
Pallister-Killian syndrome
MedGen UID:
120540
Concept ID:
C0265449
Disease or Syndrome
Pallister-Killian syndrome is a dysmorphic condition involving most organ systems, but also characterized by a tissue-limited mosaicism; most fibroblasts have 47 chromosomes with an extra small metacentric chromosome, whereas the karyotype of lymphocytes is normal. The extra metacentric chromosome is an isochromosome for part of the short arm of chromosome 12: i(12)(p10) (Peltomaki et al., 1987; Warburton et al., 1987).
Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome
MedGen UID:
82785
Concept ID:
C0268301
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with androgen insensitivity have a 46,XY karyotype and testes that produce age-appropriate androgen levels but have undermasculinized external genitalia due to defects in androgen action. The phenotype in PAIS varies depending on residual androgen receptor function, ranging from severe undermasculinization presenting as female-like external genitalia to male-appearing genitalia. The typical presentation comprises micropenis, severe hypospadias, and bifid scrotum with or without cryptorchidism (summary by Mongan et al., 2015).
De Lange syndrome
MedGen UID:
78752
Concept ID:
C0270972
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
3 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
452446
Concept ID:
C0342471
Disease or Syndrome
Classic 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency is an autosomal recessive form of CAH characterized by a severe impairment of steroid biosynthesis in both the adrenals and the gonads, resulting in decreased excretion of cortisol and aldosterone and of progesterone, androgens, and estrogens by these tissues. Affected newborns exhibit signs and symptoms of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiencies, which may be fatal if not diagnosed and treated early, especially in the severe salt-wasting form. Moreover, male newborns exhibit pseudohermaphroditism with incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia due to an impairment of androgen biosynthesis in the testis. In contrast, affected females exhibit normal sexual differentiation or partial virilization (summary by Rheaume et al., 1992).
Cholesterol monooxygenase (side-chain cleaving) deficiency
MedGen UID:
83341
Concept ID:
C0342474
Disease or Syndrome
Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia, the most severe disorder of steroid hormone biosynthesis, is caused by a defect in the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone, the first step in adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis. All affected individuals are phenotypic females with a severe salt-losing syndrome that is fatal if not treated in early infancy (summary by Lin et al., 1991 and Bose et al., 1996).
Branchiooculofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
91261
Concept ID:
C0376524
Disease or Syndrome
The branchiooculofacial syndrome (BOFS) is characterized by: branchial (cervical or infra- or supra-auricular) skin defects that range from barely perceptible thin skin or hair patch to erythematous "hemangiomatous" lesions to large weeping erosions; ocular anomalies that can include microphthalmia, anophthalmia, coloboma, and nasolacrimal duct stenosis/atresia; and facial anomalies that can include ocular hypertelorism or telecanthus, broad nasal tip, upslanted palpebral fissures, cleft lip or prominent philtral pillars that give the appearance of a repaired cleft lip (formerly called "pseudocleft lip") with or without cleft palate, upper lip pits, and lower facial weakness (asymmetric crying face or partial 7th cranial nerve weakness). Malformed and prominent pinnae and hearing loss from inner ear and/or petrous bone anomalies are common. Intellect is usually normal.
Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
95931
Concept ID:
C0392475
Disease or Syndrome
Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by prenatal growth retardation (ranging from mild to severe), craniofacial findings (including microcephaly and cleft lip and/or palate) and limb malformations (including bilateral symmetric tetraphocomelia or hypomelia caused by mesomelic shortening). Upper limbs are more severely affected than lower limbs. Other limb malformations include oligodactyly with thumb aplasia or hypoplasia, syndactyly, clinodactyly, and elbow and knee flexion contractures. Craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and/or cleft palate, premaxillary prominence, micrognathia, microbrachycephaly, malar flattening, downslanted palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, exophthalmos resulting from shallow orbits, corneal clouding, underdeveloped ala nasi, beaked nose, and ear malformations. Intellectual disability is reported in the majority of affected individuals. Mortality is high among severely affected pregnancies and newborns. Mildly affected individuals may survive to adulthood.
Lethal tight skin contracture syndrome
MedGen UID:
98356
Concept ID:
C0406585
Disease or Syndrome
Restrictive dermopathy is a rare, lethal genodermatosis with characteristic manifestations that are easily recognizable at birth: thin, tightly adherent translucent skin with erosions at flexure sites, superficial vessels, typical facial dysmorphism, and generalized joint ankylosis. Prenatal signs can include intrauterine growth retardation, reduced fetal movements, polyhydramnios, and premature rupture of the membranes. Most infants die within the first week of life (summary by Smigiel et al., 2010).
Hay-Wells syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
98032
Concept ID:
C0406709
Congenital Abnormality
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (subjective hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, and hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring and alopecia, hypospadias, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Familial hypoplastic, glomerulocystic kidney
MedGen UID:
96569
Concept ID:
C0431693
Disease or Syndrome
The 17q12 recurrent deletion syndrome is characterized by variable combinations of the three following findings: structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), and neurodevelopmental or neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., global developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, and bipolar disorder). Using a method of data analysis that avoids ascertainment bias, the authors determined that multicystic kidneys and other structural renal anomalies occur in 80% to 85% of affected individuals, MODY5 in approximately 40%, and some degree of developmental delay or learning disability in approximately 50%. MODY5 is most often diagnosed before age 25 years (range: 10 to 50 years).
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 2
MedGen UID:
96587
Concept ID:
C0432246
Congenital Abnormality
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, severe proportionate short stature, and microcephaly. It is distinct from Seckel syndrome (see 210600) by more severe growth retardation, radiologic abnormalities, and absent or mild mental retardation (summary by Willems et al., 2010).
Lenz-Majewski hyperostosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
98483
Concept ID:
C0432269
Congenital Abnormality
Lenz-Majewski hyperostotic dwarfism is a rare condition characterized by intellectual disability, sclerosing bone dysplasia, distinct craniofacial and dental anomalies, loose skin, and distal limb anomalies, particularly brachydactyly and symphalangism. Patients have multiple radiographic abnormalities due to progressive generalized hyperostosis that affects the cranium, vertebrae, and diaphyses of tubular bones, leading to severe growth retardation (summary by Sousa et al., 2014).
Osteoglophonic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
96592
Concept ID:
C0432283
Congenital Abnormality
Osteoglophonic dysplasia is a condition characterized by abnormal bone growth that leads to severe head and face (craniofacial) abnormalities, dwarfism, and other features. The term osteoglophonic refers to the bones (osteo-) having distinctive hollowed out (-glophonic) areas that appear as holes on x-ray images.Premature fusion of certain bones in the skull (craniosynostosis) typically occurs in osteoglophonic dysplasia. The craniosynostosis associated with this disorder may give the head a tall appearance, often referred to in the medical literature as a tower-shaped skull, or a relatively mild version of a deformity called a cloverleaf skull. Characteristic facial features in people with osteoglophonic dysplasia include a prominent forehead (frontal bossing), widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), flattening of the bridge of the nose and of the middle of the face (midface hypoplasia), a large tongue (macroglossia), a protruding jaw (prognathism), and a short neck. People with this condition usually have no visible teeth because the teeth never emerge from the jaw (clinical anodontia). In addition, the gums are often overgrown (hypertrophic gingiva).Infants with osteoglophonic dysplasia often experience failure to thrive, which means they do not gain weight and grow at the expected rate. Affected individuals have short, bowed legs and arms and are short in stature. They also have flat feet and short, broad hands and fingers.The life expectancy of people with osteoglophonic dysplasia depends on the extent of their craniofacial abnormalities; those that obstruct the air passages and affect the mouth and teeth can lead to respiratory problems and cause difficulty with eating and drinking. Despite the skull abnormalities, intelligence is generally not affected in this disorder.
Deletion of long arm of chromosome 18
MedGen UID:
96605
Concept ID:
C0432443
Disease or Syndrome
A condition in which some or all of the cells of the body contain extra genetic material from chromosome 18. Clinical features of this condition may include the following: spina bifida, hearing loss, cleft lip, cleft palate, undescended testes, rocker bottom feet, micrognathia, low set ears, cardiac anomalies (ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of Fallot), intellectual disability, holoprosencephaly, pituitary dysplasia, seizures, autoimmune disorders, hip dysplasia, and/or congenital cataracts.
Chromosome 9, monosomy 9p
MedGen UID:
167073
Concept ID:
C0795830
Disease or Syndrome
Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 with mental retardation, craniofacial anomalies, abnormal dermatoglyphics, short and webbed neck, heart murmurs, square nails, and other defects.
11q partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
162878
Concept ID:
C0795841
Disease or Syndrome
Jacobsen syndrome is a condition caused by a loss of genetic material from chromosome 11. Because this deletion occurs at the end (terminus) of the long (q) arm of chromosome 11, Jacobsen syndrome is also known as 11q terminal deletion disorder.The signs and symptoms of Jacobsen syndrome vary considerably. Most affected individuals have delayed development, including the development of speech and motor skills (such as sitting, standing, and walking). Most also have cognitive impairment and learning difficulties. Behavioral problems have been reported, including compulsive behavior (such as shredding paper), a short attention span, and easy distractibility. Many people with Jacobsen syndrome have been diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Jacobsen syndrome is also associated with an increased likelihood of autism spectrum disorders, which are characterized by impaired communication and socialization skills.Jacobsen syndrome is also characterized by distinctive facial features. These include small and low-set ears, widely set eyes (hypertelorism) with droopy eyelids (ptosis), skin folds covering the inner corner of the eyes (epicanthal folds), a broad nasal bridge, downturned corners of the mouth, a thin upper lip, and a small lower jaw. Affected individuals often have a large head size (macrocephaly) and a skull abnormality called trigonocephaly, which gives the forehead a pointed appearance.More than 90 percent of people with Jacobsen syndrome have a bleeding disorder called Paris-Trousseau syndrome. This condition causes a lifelong risk of abnormal bleeding and easy bruising. Paris-Trousseau syndrome is a disorder of platelets, which are blood cell fragments that are necessary for blood clotting.Other features of Jacobsen syndrome can include heart defects, feeding difficulties in infancy, short stature, frequent ear and sinus infections, and skeletal abnormalities. The disorder can also affect the digestive system, kidneys, and genitalia. The life expectancy of people with Jacobsen syndrome is unknown, although affected individuals have lived into adulthood.
Chromosome 16-related alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
162892
Concept ID:
C0795917
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability (ATRX) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, genital anomalies, severe developmental delays, hypotonia, intellectual disability, and mild-to-moderate anemia secondary to alpha-thalassemia. Craniofacial abnormalities include small head circumference, telecanthus or widely spaced eyes, short nose, tented vermilion of the upper lip, and thick or everted vermilion of the lower lip with coarsening of the facial features over time. Although all affected individuals have a normal 46,XY karyotype, genital anomalies range from hypospadias and undescended testicles to severe hypospadias and ambiguous genitalia, to normal-appearing female external genitalia. Global developmental delays are evident in infancy and some affected individuals never walk independently or develop significant speech.
Harrod Doman Keele syndrome
MedGen UID:
162895
Concept ID:
C0795970
Disease or Syndrome
The association of intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphism (a highly arched palate, pointed chin, and small mouth, hypotelorism, a long nose and large protruding ears), arachnodactyly, hypogenitalism (undescended testes and hypospadias) and failure to thrive. So far, it has been described in three males (including two brothers). An autosomal recessive mode of transmission has been suggested.
Hypospadias mental retardation Goldblatt type
MedGen UID:
162896
Concept ID:
C0795989
Disease or Syndrome
Hypospadias, retarded mental development, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism, joint laxity, and beaked nails.
Mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome X-linked, 1
MedGen UID:
167093
Concept ID:
C0796003
Disease or Syndrome
The term 'X-linked mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome' comprises several syndromes previously reported separately. These include Juberg-Marsidi, Carpenter-Waziri, Holmes-Gang, and Smith-Fineman-Myers syndromes as well as 1 family with X-linked mental retardation with spastic paraplegia. All these syndromes were found to be caused by mutation in the XH2 gene and are characterized primarily by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, and a highly skewed X-inactivation pattern in carrier women (Abidi et al., 2005). Other more variable features include hypogonadism, deafness, renal anomalies, and mild skeletal defects. X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X; 301040) is an allelic disorder with a similar phenotype with the addition of alpha-thalassemia and Hb H inclusion bodies in erythrocytes.
Peters plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
163204
Concept ID:
C0796012
Disease or Syndrome
Peters plus syndrome is characterized by anterior chamber eye anomalies, short limbs with broad distal extremities, characteristic facial features, cleft lip/palate, and variable developmental delay/intellectual disability. The most common anterior chamber defect is Peters' anomaly, consisting of central corneal clouding, thinning of the posterior cornea, and iridocorneal adhesions. Cataracts and glaucoma are common. Developmental delay is observed in about 80% of children; intellectual disability can range from mild to severe.
Lenz microphthalmia syndrome
MedGen UID:
162898
Concept ID:
C0796016
Congenital Abnormality
Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or clinical anophthalmia with malformations of the ears, teeth, fingers, skeleton, and/or genitourinary system. Microphthalmia is often accompanied by microcornea and glaucoma. Coloboma is present in approximately 60% of microphthalmic eyes with severity ranging from isolated iris coloboma to coloboma of the ciliary body, choroid, and optic disk. Ears may be low set, anteverted, posteriorly rotated, simple, cup shaped, or abnormally modeled. Hearing loss has been observed. Dental findings include irregularly shaped, missing, or widely spaced teeth. Duplicated thumbs, syndactyly, clinodactyly, camptodactyly, and microcephaly are common, as are narrow/sloping shoulders, underdeveloped clavicles, kyphoscoliosis, exaggerated lumbar lordosis, long cylindric thorax, and webbed neck. Genitourinary anomalies include hypospadias, cryptorchidism, renal hypoplasia/aplasia, and hydroureter. Approximately 60% of affected males have mild-to-severe intellectual disability or developmental delay.
Marden-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
163206
Concept ID:
C0796033
Disease or Syndrome
A constellation of immobile facies, blepharophimosis, micrognathia, microcephaly, midfacial hypoplasia, multiple contractures, hypotonia, arachnodactyly, developmental delay, and other anomalies.
Linear skin defects with multiple congenital anomalies 1
MedGen UID:
163210
Concept ID:
C0796070
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microophthalmia and/or anophthalmia and linear skin defects, usually involving the face and neck, which are present at birth and heal with age, leaving minimal residual scarring. Other findings can include central nervous system involvement (e.g., structural anomalies, infantile seizures), developmental delay, heart defects (e.g., hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, oncocytic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias), short stature, diaphragmatic hernia, nail dystrophy, preauricular pits and hearing loss, and genitourinary malformations. Inter- and intrafamilial variability is considerable.
Intellectual deficit Buenos-Aires type
MedGen UID:
167102
Concept ID:
C0796080
Disease or Syndrome
A rare intellectual disability syndrome with characteristics of growth retardation, microcephaly, characteristic facial features (including narrow forehead, bushy eyebrows, hypertelorism, small, downward-slanting palpebral fissures with blepharoptosis, malformed and low-set ears, broad straight nose, thin upper lip and a wide, tented mouth), developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech disorder, and multiple organ malformations (e.g. ventricular septal defect, megaloureter, dilated renal pelvis). Additional manifestations reported include neurocutaneous lesions (including palmoplantar hyperkeratosis), internal hydrocephalus, and bilateral partial soft-tissue syndactyly of second and third toe.
Proud Levine Carpenter syndrome
MedGen UID:
163217
Concept ID:
C0796124
Disease or Syndrome
Proud syndrome is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, severe mental retardation, seizures, and spasticity. Males are severely affected, whereas females may be unaffected or have a milder phenotype (Proud et al., 1992). Proud syndrome is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from lissencephaly (LISX2; 300215) to Proud syndrome to infantile spasms without brain malformations (EIEE1; 308350) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008).
Renpenning syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
208670
Concept ID:
C0796135
Disease or Syndrome
Renpenning syndrome is an X-linked mental retardation syndrome with clinically recognizable features. Affected individuals have microcephaly, short stature, small testes, and dysmorphic facies, including tall narrow face, upslanting palpebral fissures, abnormal nasal configuration, cupped ears, and short philtrum. The nose may appear long or bulbous, with overhanging columella. Less consistent manifestations include ocular colobomas, cardiac malformations, cleft palate, and anal anomalies. Stevenson et al. (2005) proposed that the various X-linked mental retardation syndromes due to PQBP1 mutations be combined under the name of Renpenning syndrome.
Dandy-Walker like malformation with atrioventricular septal defect
MedGen UID:
163220
Concept ID:
C0796137
Disease or Syndrome
The 3C syndrome, also known as Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome, is a developmental malformation syndrome characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, congenital heart defects, and cerebellar brain malformations. Facial features include prominent occiput, prominent forehead, low-set ears, downslanting palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia. Cardiac defects can include septal defects and aortic stenosis, among others, and brain imaging shows Dandy-Walker malformation, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, posterior fossa cysts, and ventricular dilatation. Affected individuals have severe developmental delay (summary by Leonardi et al., 2001; Seidahmed et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Ritscher-Schinzel Syndrome See also RTSC2 (300963), caused by mutation in the CCDC22 gene (300859) on chromosome Xp11.
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome
MedGen UID:
162917
Concept ID:
C0796154
Disease or Syndrome
Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) is characterized by pre- and postnatal macrosomia; distinctive craniofacies (including macrocephaly, coarse facial features, macrostomia, macroglossia, palatal abnormalities); and commonly, mild to severe intellectual disability with or without structural brain anomalies. Other variable findings include supernumerary nipples, diastasis recti/umbilical hernia, congenital heart defects, diaphragmatic hernia, genitourinary defects, and GI anomalies. Skeletal anomalies can include vertebral fusion, scoliosis, rib anomalies, and congenital hip dislocation. Hand anomalies can include large hands and postaxial polydactyly. Affected individuals are at increased risk for embryonal tumors, including Wilms tumor, hepatoblastoma, adrenal neuroblastoma, gonadoblastoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma.
Toriello Carey syndrome
MedGen UID:
163225
Concept ID:
C0796184
Disease or Syndrome
The Toriello-Carey syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly disorder with variable systemic manifestations, most commonly including mental retardation, agenesis of the corpus callosum, postnatal growth delay, cardiac defects, usually septal defects, distal limb defects, and urogenital anomalies in affected males. Patients have facial dysmorphic features, micrognathia, including full cheeks, hypertelorism, flattened nasal bridge, anteverted nares, and short neck. Not all features are found in all patients and some patients may have additional features such as anal anomalies or hernias (review by Toriello et al., 2003).
21-hydroxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
468578
Concept ID:
C0852654
Disease or Syndrome
21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a family of autosomal recessive disorders involving impaired synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. In 21-OHD CAH, excessive adrenal androgen biosynthesis results in virilization in all individuals and salt wasting in some individuals. A classic form with severe enzyme deficiency and prenatal onset of virilization is distinguished from a non-classic form with mild enzyme deficiency and postnatal onset. The classic form is further divided into the simple virilizing form (~25% of affected individuals) and the salt-wasting form, in which aldosterone production is inadequate (=75% of individuals). Newborns with salt-wasting 21-OHD CAH are at risk for life-threatening salt-wasting crises. Individuals with the non-classic form of 21-OHD CAH present postnatally with signs of hyperandrogenism; females with the non-classic form are not virilized at birth.
Hajdu-Cheney syndrome
MedGen UID:
182961
Concept ID:
C0917715
Disease or Syndrome
Hajdu-Cheney syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by short stature, coarse and dysmorphic facies, bowing of the long bones, and vertebral anomalies. Facial features include hypertelorism, bushy eyebrows, micrognathia, small mouth with dental anomalies, low-set ears, and short neck. There is progressive focal bone destruction, including acroosteolysis and generalized osteoporosis. Additional and variable features include hearing loss, renal cysts, and cardiovascular anomalies (summary by Ramos et al., 1998; Simpson et al., 2011; Isidor et al., 2011).
Dyskeratosis congenita X-linked
MedGen UID:
216941
Concept ID:
C1148551
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a telomere biology disorder, is characterized by a classic triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia. The classic triad may not be present in all individuals. People with DC are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include: abnormal pigmentation changes not restricted to the upper chest and neck, eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), and dental abnormalities (caries, periodontal disease, taurodauntism). Although most persons with DC have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in the two variants in which additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Progeroid short stature with pigmented nevi
MedGen UID:
224702
Concept ID:
C1261128
Disease or Syndrome
Mulvihill-Smith syndrome is characterized by premature aging, multiple pigmented nevi, lack of facial subcutaneous fat, microcephaly, short stature, sensorineural hearing loss, and mental retardation. Immunodeficiency may also be a feature. Adult manifestations include the development of tumors, a sleep disorder with severe insomnia, and cognitive decline (summary by Yagihashi et al., 2009).
Rapp-Hodgkin ectodermal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
315656
Concept ID:
C1785148
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (subjective hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, and hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring and alopecia, hypospadias, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Opitz G/BBB syndrome
MedGen UID:
321463
Concept ID:
C1801950
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a range of findings including the following: Congenital heart disease (74% of individuals), particularly conotruncal malformations (tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, ventricular septal defect, and truncus arteriosus). Palatal abnormalities (69%), particularly velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate. Characteristic facial features (present in the majority of individuals of northern European heritage). Learning difficulties (70%-90%). An immune deficiency (regardless of the clinical presentation) (77%). Additional findings include the following: Hypocalcemia (50%). Significant feeding and swallowing problems; constipation with or without structural gastrointestinal anomalies (intestinal malrotation, imperforate anus, and Hirschsprung disease). Renal anomalies (31%). Hearing loss (both conductive and sensorineural). Laryngotracheoesophageal anomalies. Growth hormone deficiency. Autoimmune disorders. Seizures (idiopathic or associated with hypocalcemia). CNS anomalies including tethered cord. Skeletal abnormalities (scoliosis with or without vertebral anomalies, clubbed feet, polydactyly, and craniosynostosis). Ophthalmologic abnormalities (strabismus, posterior embryotoxon, tortuous retinal vessels, scleracornea, and anophthalmia). Enamel hypoplasia. Malignancies (rare). Developmental delay (in particular delays in emergence of language), intellectual disability, and learning differences (non-verbal learning disability where the verbal IQ is significantly greater than the performance IQ) are common. Autism or autistic spectrum disorder is found in approximately 20% of children and psychiatric illness (specifically schizophrenia) is present in 25% of adults; however, attention deficit disorder, anxiety, perseveration, and difficulty with social interactions are also common.
Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
316937
Concept ID:
C1832229
Disease or Syndrome
Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a disorder of morphogenesis that results in abnormal development of the anterior segment of the eye, which results in blindness from glaucoma in approximately 50% of affected individuals. Systemic abnormalities, including cardiac and dental anomalies, are associated. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity and nomenclature of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, see RIEG1 (180500).
Van Maldergem syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
318616
Concept ID:
C1832390
Disease or Syndrome
Van Maldergem syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intellectual disability, typical craniofacial features, auditory malformations resulting in hearing loss, and skeletal and limb malformations. Some patients have renal hypoplasia. Brain MRI typically shows periventricular nodular heterotopia (summary by Cappello et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Van Maldergem Syndrome See also VMLDS2 (615546), caused by mutation in the FAT4 gene (612411) on chromosome 4q28.
Pancreatic hypoplasia, intestinal atresia, and gallbladder aplasia or hypoplasia, with or without tracheoesophageal fistula
MedGen UID:
318628
Concept ID:
C1832443
Disease or Syndrome
The Martinez-Frias syndrome is characterized by pancreatic hypoplasia, intestinal atresia, and gallbladder aplasia or hypoplasia, with or without tracheoesophageal fistula. There is considerable phenotypic overlap between Martinez-Frias syndrome and Mitchell-Riley syndrome (MTCHRS; 615710), the latter being characterized by neonatal diabetes in addition to the features of the Martinez-Frias syndrome, but without tracheoesophageal fistula (Smith et al., 2010).
Blepharofacioskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
371716
Concept ID:
C1834038
Disease or Syndrome
Schilbach-Rott syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypotelorism, epicanthal folds, cleft palate, dysmorphic facies, and hypospadias in males. The phenotype is variable; mild mental retardation has been reported (summary by Shkalim et al., 2009).
Cleft palate, cardiac defect, genital anomalies, and ectrodactyly
MedGen UID:
324947
Concept ID:
C1838121
Disease or Syndrome
Radius absent anogenital anomalies
MedGen UID:
333312
Concept ID:
C1839410
Disease or Syndrome
Hand foot uterus syndrome
MedGen UID:
331103
Concept ID:
C1841679
Disease or Syndrome
Hand-foot-genital syndrome (HFGS) is characterized by limb malformations and urogenital defects. Mild bilateral shortening of the thumbs and great toes, caused primarily by shortening of the distal phalanx and/or the first metacarpal or metatarsal, is the most common limb malformation and results in impaired dexterity or apposition of the thumbs. Urogenital abnormalities include: abnormalities of the ureters and urethra and various degrees of incomplete Müllerian fusion in females; hypospadias of variable severity with or without chordee in males. Vesicoureteral reflux, recurrent urinary tract infections, and chronic pyelonephritis are common; fertility is normal.
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
1p36 deletion syndrome is characterized by typical craniofacial features consisting of straight eyebrows, deeply set eyes, midface retrusion, wide and depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, pointed chin, large, late-closing anterior fontanel (77%), microbrachycephaly (65%), epicanthal folds (50%), and posteriorly rotated, low-set, abnormal ears. Other characteristic findings include brachy/camptodactyly and short feet. Developmental delay/intellectual disability of variable degree are present in all, and hypotonia in 95%. Seizures occur in 44%-58% of affected individuals. Other findings include structural brain abnormalities (88%), congenital heart defects (71%), eye/vision problems (52%), hearing loss (47%), skeletal anomalies (41%), abnormalities of the external genitalia (25%), and renal abnormalities (22%).
Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II
MedGen UID:
337064
Concept ID:
C1844696
Congenital Abnormality
The otopalatodigital (OPD) spectrum disorders, characterized primarily by skeletal dysplasia, include the following: Otopalatodigital syndrome type I (OPD1). Otopalatodigital syndrome type II (OPD2). Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD). Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS). Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary skin defects (TODPD). In OPD1, most manifestations are present at birth; females can present with severity similar to affected males, although some have only mild manifestations. In OPD2, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Most males with OPD2 die during the first year of life, usually from thoracic hypoplasia resulting in pulmonary insufficiency. Males who live beyond the first year of life are usually developmentally delayed and require respiratory support and assistance with feeding. In FMD, females are less severely affected than related affected males. Males do not experience progression of skeletal dysplasia but may have joint contractures and hand and foot malformations. Progressive scoliosis is observed in both affected males and females. In MNS, wide phenotypic variability is observed; some individuals are diagnosed in adulthood, while others require respiratory support and have reduced longevity. Prenatal lethality is most common in males with MNS. TODPD is a female limited condition, characterized by terminal skeletal dysplasia, pigmentary defects of the skin, and recurrent digital fibromata.
Abruzzo Erickson syndrome
MedGen UID:
375529
Concept ID:
C1844862
Disease or Syndrome
A multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with manifestations of cleft palate, ocular coloboma, hypospadias, mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss, short stature and radio-ulnar synostosis. To date, 4 cases have been described in the literature. These manifestations overlap with those of CHARGE syndrome, however, in contrast to CHARGE syndrome, patients with Abruzzo-Erikson syndrome do not show intellectual disability, choanal atresia or genital hypoplasia. Inherited in an X-linked recessive manner, with a carrier female having a 50% chance of transmitting the mutation to her offspring.
Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, distal, X-linked
MedGen UID:
337123
Concept ID:
C1844934
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked infantile spinal muscular atrophy (XL-SMA) is characterized by congenital hypotonia and areflexia and evidence of degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells (i.e., lower motor neurons) in the spinal cord and brain stem. Often congenital contractures and/or fractures are present. Intellect is normal. Life span is shortened because of progressive ventilatory insufficiency resulting from chest muscle involvement.
ATR-X syndrome
MedGen UID:
337145
Concept ID:
C1845055
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability (ATRX) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, genital anomalies, severe developmental delays, hypotonia, intellectual disability, and mild-to-moderate anemia secondary to alpha-thalassemia. Craniofacial abnormalities include small head circumference, telecanthus or widely spaced eyes, short nose, tented vermilion of the upper lip, and thick or everted vermilion of the lower lip with coarsening of the facial features over time. Although all affected individuals have a normal 46,XY karyotype, genital anomalies range from hypospadias and undescended testicles to severe hypospadias and ambiguous genitalia, to normal-appearing female external genitalia. Global developmental delays are evident in infancy and some affected individuals never walk independently or develop significant speech.
Hartsfield syndrome
MedGen UID:
335111
Concept ID:
C1845146
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a structural anomaly of the brain in which there is failed or incomplete separation of the forebrain early in gestation. Classic HPE encompasses a continuum of brain malformations including (in order of decreasing severity): alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV) type HPE; a septopreoptic type has also been described. Other CNS abnormalities not specific to HPE may also occur. HPE is accompanied by a spectrum of characteristic craniofacial anomalies in approximately 80% of individuals with HPE. Developmental delay is present in virtually all individuals with the HPE spectrum of CNS anomalies. Seizures and pituitary dysfunction are common. Most affected fetuses do not survive; severely affected children typically do not survive beyond early infancy, while a significant proportion of more mildly affected children survive past 12 months. Mildly manifesting individuals without appreciable brain anomalies on conventional neuroimaging may be described as having “microform” HPE.
Syndromic X-linked mental retardation, Cabezas type
MedGen UID:
337334
Concept ID:
C1845861
Disease or Syndrome
This form of syndromic X-linked mental retardation is characterized primarily by short stature, hypogonadism, and abnormal gait, with other more variable features such as speech delay, prominent lower lip, and tremor (Cabezas et al., 2000).
Intrauterine growth retardation, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genital anomalies
MedGen UID:
337364
Concept ID:
C1846009
Disease or Syndrome
IMAGe syndrome is an acronym for the major findings of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genitourinary abnormalities (in males). Findings reported in individuals with a clinical and/or molecular diagnosis include: IUGR; Some type of skeletal abnormality (most commonly delayed bone age and short stature and, occasionally, metaphyseal and epiphyseal dysplasia of varying severity); Adrenal insufficiency often presenting in the first month of life as an adrenal crisis or rarely later in childhood with failure to thrive and recurrent vomiting; Genital abnormalities in males (cryptorchidism, micropenis, and hypospadias) but not in females. Hypotonia and developmental delay are reported in some; cognitive outcome appears to be normal in the majority.
Cree mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
335673
Concept ID:
C1847361
Disease or Syndrome
Seckel syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
338264
Concept ID:
C1847572
Disease or Syndrome
Primary autosomal recessive microcephalies (MCPH) and Seckel syndrome (SCKS) spectrum disorders are characterized by microcephaly and the absence of visceral malformations. Although MCHP and SCKS were previously distinguished by height (maximum height in SCKS was equivalent to the minimum height in MCPH), stature is no longer a discriminating feature, leading to the conclusion that these phenotypes constitute a spectrum rather than distinct entities. Microcephaly is characterized by: Onset during the second trimester of gestation; Occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) at birth equal to or less than -2 SD below the mean for sex, age, and ethnicity; Slower than average increase in OFC after birth. Variable findings in the MCPH-SCKS spectrum disorders include: Brain structure (which is normal in the majority); Degree of cognitive impairment (usually mild to moderate without significant motor delay in the majority of persons with MCPH and more severe in those with SCKS and MCPH with brain malformations); Degree of short stature; Craniosynostosis (which may be secondary to poor brain growth).
Ulna and fibula absence of with severe limb deficiency
MedGen UID:
336388
Concept ID:
C1848651
Disease or Syndrome
The Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia syndrome (AARRS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe malformations of upper and lower limbs with severely hypoplastic pelvis and abnormal genitalia. The disorder is believed to represent a defect of dorsoventral patterning and outgrowth of limbs (summary by Kantaputra et al., 2010).
Three M syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
336440
Concept ID:
C1848862
Disease or Syndrome
3-M syndrome is characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation (final height 5-6 SD below the mean; i.e., 120-130 cm), characteristic facies, and normal intelligence. Additional features of 3-M syndrome include short broad neck, prominent trapezii, deformed sternum, short thorax, square shoulders, winged scapulae, hyperlordosis, short fifth fingers, prominent heels, and loose joints. Males with 3-M syndrome have hypogonadism and, occasionally, hypospadias.
Otoonychoperoneal syndrome
MedGen UID:
376704
Concept ID:
C1850105
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome
MedGen UID:
338026
Concept ID:
C1850343
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy (MVA) syndrome is a rare disorder in which some cells in the body have an abnormal number of chromosomes instead of the usual 46 chromosomes, a situation known as aneuploidy. Most commonly, cells have an extra chromosome, which is called trisomy, or are missing a chromosome, which is known as monosomy. In MVA syndrome, some cells are aneuploid and others have the normal number of chromosomes, which is a phenomenon known as mosaicism. Typically, at least one-quarter of cells in affected individuals have an abnormal number of chromosomes. Because the additional or missing chromosomes vary among the abnormal cells, the aneuploidy is described as variegated.In MVA syndrome, growth before birth is slow (intrauterine growth restriction). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate and are shorter than average. In addition, they typically have an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Another common feature of MVA syndrome is an increased risk of developing cancer in childhood. Cancers that occur most frequently in affected individuals include a cancer of muscle tissue called rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of kidney cancer known as Wilms tumor, and a cancer of the blood-forming tissue known as leukemia.Less commonly, people with MVA syndrome have eye abnormalities or distinctive facial features, such as a broad nasal bridge and low-set ears. Some affected individuals have brain abnormalities, the most common of which is called Dandy-Walker malformation. Intellectual disability, seizures, and other health problems can also occur in people with MVA syndrome.There are at least three types of MVA syndrome, each with a different genetic cause. Type 1 is the most common and displays the classic signs and symptoms described above. Type 2 appears to have slightly different signs and symptoms than type 1, although the small number of affected individuals makes it difficult to define its characteristic features. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 grow slowly before and after birth; however, their head size is typically normal. Some people with MVA syndrome type 2 have unusually short arms. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 do not seem to have an increased risk of cancer. Another form of MVA syndrome is characterized by a high risk of developing Wilms tumor. Individuals with this form may also have other signs and symptoms typical of MVA syndrome type 1.
Lambert syndrome
MedGen UID:
343381
Concept ID:
C1855551
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare syndrome described in four siblings of one French family and with characteristics of branchial dysplasia (malar hypoplasia, macrostomia, preauricular tags and meatal atresia), club feet, inguinal hernia and cholestasis due to paucity of interlobular bile ducts and intellectual deficit.
Vici syndrome
MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
Vici syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), cataracts, pigmentary defects, progressive cardiomyopathy, and variable immunodeficiency. Affected individuals also have profound psychomotor retardation and hypotonia due to a myopathy (summary by Finocchi et al., 2012).
Hypertelorism and tetralogy of Fallot
MedGen UID:
344606
Concept ID:
C1855903
Disease or Syndrome
Naguib-Richieri-Costa syndrome
MedGen UID:
383797
Concept ID:
C1855904
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare syndrome associating an acro-fronto-facio-nasal dysostosis with genitourinary anomalies. It has been described in three families. Craniofacial manifestations include wide anterior fontanelle, flat occiput, hypertelorism, ptosis, proptosis, broad nasal bridge and nasal tip, long philtrum and posteriorly rotated or low set ears. Hypospadias and shawl scrotum are present in all males. Acral manifestations include syndactyly of fingers, broad thumbs or halluces or preaxial polydactyly. The affected patients have no intellectual deficit. The condition seems to be hereditary, and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Genito palato cardiac syndrome
MedGen UID:
341558
Concept ID:
C1856466
Disease or Syndrome
Craniosynostosis-mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig
MedGen UID:
341781
Concept ID:
C1857473
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacial dyssynostosis
MedGen UID:
347473
Concept ID:
C1857511
Disease or Syndrome
Yunis Varon syndrome
MedGen UID:
341818
Concept ID:
C1857663
Disease or Syndrome
Yunis-Varon syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal defects, including cleidocranial dysplasia and digital anomalies, and severe neurologic involvement with neuronal loss. Enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles are found in neurons, muscle, and cartilage. The disorder is usually lethal in infancy (summary by Campeau et al., 2013).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria type V
MedGen UID:
347542
Concept ID:
C1857776
Disease or Syndrome
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type V is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of dilated or noncompaction cardiomyopathy in infancy or early childhood. Many patients die of cardiac failure. Other features include microcytic anemia, growth retardation, mild ataxia, mild muscle weakness, genital anomalies in males, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Some patients may have optic atrophy or delayed psychomotor development (summary by Davey et al., 2006 and Ojala et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
347610
Concept ID:
C1858054
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Blepharophimosis with facial and genital anomalies and mental retardation
MedGen UID:
347661
Concept ID:
C1858538
Disease or Syndrome
Bowen syndrome
MedGen UID:
349159
Concept ID:
C1859404
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 3
MedGen UID:
349167
Concept ID:
C1859439
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
347181
Concept ID:
C1859566
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Microphthalmia syndromic 3
MedGen UID:
347232
Concept ID:
C1859773
Disease or Syndrome
SOX2-related eye disorders are characterized by anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia that is usually bilateral, severe, and apparent at birth or by prenatal ultrasound examination. Other common findings include brain malformations, esophageal atresia, cryptorchidism and/or micropenis in males, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and/or pituitary hypoplasia. Postnatal growth failure, delayed motor development, and learning disability are common.
Antley-Bixler syndrome with genital anomalies and disordered steroidogenesis
MedGen UID:
348008
Concept ID:
C1860042
Disease or Syndrome
Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a disorder of steroidogenesis with a broad phenotypic spectrum including cortisol deficiency, altered sex steroid synthesis, disorders of sex development (DSD), and skeletal malformations of the Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) phenotype. Cortisol deficiency is usually partial, with some baseline cortisol production but failure to mount an adequate cortisol response in stress. Mild mineralocorticoid excess can be present and causes arterial hypertension, usually presenting in young adulthood. Manifestations of altered sex steroid synthesis include ambiguous genitalia/DSD in both males and females, large ovarian cysts in females, poor masculinization and delayed puberty in males, and maternal virilization during pregnancy with an affected fetus. Skeletal malformations can manifest as craniosynostosis, mid-face retrusion with proptosis and choanal stenosis or atresia, low-set dysplastic ears with stenotic external auditory canals, hydrocephalus, radiohumeral synostosis, neonatal fractures, congenital bowing of the long bones, joint contractures, arachnodactyly, and clubfeet; other anomalies observed include urinary tract anomalies (renal pelvic dilatation, vesicoureteral reflux). Cognitive impairment is of minor concern and likely associated with the severity of malformations; studies of developmental outcomes are lacking.
Bork Stender Schmidt syndrome
MedGen UID:
348658
Concept ID:
C1860605
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia syndrome, with characteristics of uncombable hair syndrome, congenital hypotrichosis and dental abnormalities such as oligodontia or hyperdontia and associated with early-onset cataract, retinal pigmentary dystrophy and brachydactyly with brachymetacarpia. Furthermore, hyperactivity and a mild intellectual deficit have been reported in affected patients.
Townes-Brocks-branchiootorenal-like syndrome
MedGen UID:
349570
Concept ID:
C1862683
Disease or Syndrome
Hypospadias, hypertelorism, upper lid coloboma, and mixed-type hearing loss
MedGen UID:
400396
Concept ID:
C1863870
Disease or Syndrome
Craniosynostosis, anal anomalies, and porokeratosis
MedGen UID:
351066
Concept ID:
C1864186
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare condition with characteristics of craniosynostosis and clavicular hypoplasia, delayed closure of the fontanelle, anal anomalies, genitourinary malformations and skin eruptions. It has been described in seven patients from four unrelated families. Cranial abnormalities include a coronal synostosis with wide-open anterior and posterior fontanelles and large parietal foramina. In some patients the skin eruption has been classified as porokeratosis. Sensorineural hearing loss and mild to severe developmental delay are common. The condition is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait.
Brachyphalangy, polydactyly, and tibial aplasia/hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
355340
Concept ID:
C1864965
Disease or Syndrome
Ectodermal dysplasia, sensorineural hearing loss, and distinctive facial features
MedGen UID:
355878
Concept ID:
C1864966
Disease or Syndrome
Radial hypoplasia, triphalangeal thumbs and hypospadias
MedGen UID:
357271
Concept ID:
C1867397
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has manifestation of symmetric, nonopposable triphalangeal thumbs and radial hypoplasia. It has been described in eight patients (five females and three males) spanning generations of a family. The affected males also presented with hypospadias. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
Pterygia, mental retardation and distinctive craniofacial features
MedGen UID:
357988
Concept ID:
C1867443
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has manifestation of short stature, craniofacial anomalies and genital hypoplasia. Intellectual deficit is also found in the majority of cases, sometimes together with pterygia. Less than 20 cases have been described so far. The mode of transmission is likely to be autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance. The syndrome is caused by unbalanced reciprocal translocations of the distal parts of chromosomes 6q and 9p, leading to partial trisomy of the distal region of chromosome 6q and partial monosomy of the distal region of chromosome 9p.
Hypospadias 3, autosomal
MedGen UID:
382538
Concept ID:
C2675154
Disease or Syndrome
Endocrine-cerebroosteodysplasia
MedGen UID:
390740
Concept ID:
C2675227
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 15q26-qter deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
390804
Concept ID:
C2675463
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia 5
MedGen UID:
382705
Concept ID:
C2675859
Disease or Syndrome
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) in its classic form is characterized by a profound normochromic and usually macrocytic anemia with normal leukocytes and platelets, congenital malformations in up to 50% of affected individuals, and growth retardation in 30% of affected individuals. The hematologic complications occur in 90% of affected individuals during the first year of life. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a mild form (e.g., mild anemia, no anemia with only subtle erythroid abnormalities, physical malformations without anemia) to a severe form of fetal anemia resulting in nonimmune hydrops fetalis. DBA is associated with an increased risk for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and solid tumors including osteogenic sarcoma.
Hunter-MacDonald syndrome
MedGen UID:
383181
Concept ID:
C2677745
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacioskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
394716
Concept ID:
C2678036
Disease or Syndrome
Serkal syndrome
MedGen UID:
394528
Concept ID:
C2678492
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive condition characterized by female to male sex reversal and kidney, adrenal, and lung dysgenesis, due to mutation(s) in the WNT4 gene.
Nuclearly-encoded mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency 1
MedGen UID:
398105
Concept ID:
C2700431
Disease or Syndrome
A distinct group of inborn defects of complex V (ATP synthase) is represented by the enzyme deficiency due to nuclear genome mutations characterized by a selective inhibition of ATP synthase biogenesis. Biochemically, the patients show a generalized decrease in the content of ATP synthase complex which is less than 30% of normal. Most cases present with neonatal-onset hypotonia, lactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Many patients die within a few months or years (summary by Mayr et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex V Deficiency Other nuclear types of mitochondrial complex V deficiency include MC5DN2 (614052), caused by mutation in the TMEM70 gene (612418) on chromosome 8q21; MC5DN3 (614053), caused by mutation in the ATP5E gene (606153) on chromosome 20q13; and MC5DN4 (615228), caused by mutation in the ATP5A1 gene (164360) on chromosome 18q. Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded MTATP6 (516060) and MTATP8 (516070) genes can also cause mitochondrial complex V deficiency (see, e.g., 551500 and 500003).
Omodysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
413823
Concept ID:
C2750355
Disease or Syndrome
Omodysplasia-2 (OMOD2) is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by shortened humeri, shortened first metacarpal, and craniofacial dysmorphism. See also OMOD1 (258315).
Chromosome 19q13.11 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
414432
Concept ID:
C2751651
Disease or Syndrome
Distal chromosome 19q13.11 deletion syndrome is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by poor overall growth, slender habitus, microcephaly, delayed development, intellectual disability with poor or absent speech, and feeding difficulties. Additional features include dysmorphic facies, signs of ectodermal dysplasia, hand and foot anomalies, and genitourinary anomalies, particularly in males (summary by Chowdhury et al., 2014).
N syndrome
MedGen UID:
424834
Concept ID:
C2936859
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome that is characterised by intellectual deficit, deafness, ocular anomalies, T-cell leukaemia, cryptorchidism, hypospadias and spasticity. Mutations in DNA polymerase alpha, leading to increased chromosome breakage, may be responsible for the syndrome. X-linked recessive transmission has been proposed.
Palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with squamous cell carcinoma of skin and 46,XX sex reversal
MedGen UID:
461281
Concept ID:
C3149931
Neoplastic Process
Witteveen-kolk syndrome
MedGen UID:
462024
Concept ID:
C3150674
Disease or Syndrome
The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay; mild to severe (usually at least moderate) intellectual disability; facial dysmorphisms; congenital malformations of the hands and feet, eye, and genitalia; joint laxity; and growth retardation and failure to thrive. Less common findings include: seizures; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hypospadias and/ or micropenis. Males and females are affected equally.
Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
462463
Concept ID:
C3151113
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect.Some people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age).Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge.Abnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair.Additional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.
Nuclearly-encoded mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
481329
Concept ID:
C3279699
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 12
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Acrodysostosis 2, with or without hormone resistance
MedGen UID:
766164
Concept ID:
C3553250
Disease or Syndrome
Acrodysostosis-2 is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by brachydactyly, facial dysostosis, and spinal stenosis. Many patients have intellectual disability and some have hormone resistance (summary by Michot et al., 2012 and Lee et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, see ACRDYS1 (101800).
Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
811487
Concept ID:
C3714873
Disease or Syndrome
Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of morphogenesis that results in abnormal development of the anterior segment of the eye, and results in blindness from glaucoma in approximately 50% of affected individuals (Fitch and Kaback, 1978). Systemic anomalies are associated, including dental hypoplasia, failure of involution of periumbilical skin, and maxillary hypoplasia (Alkemade, 1969). Genetic Heterogeneity of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome Linkage studies indicate that a second type of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome maps to chromosome 13q14 (RIEG2; 601499). A third form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (RIEG3; 602482) is caused by mutation in the FOXC1 gene (601090) on chromosome 6p25. See 109120 for a form of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with partially absent eye muscles, hydrocephalus, and skeletal abnormalities.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 13 (encephalomyopathic type)
MedGen UID:
815922
Concept ID:
C3809592
Disease or Syndrome
FBXL4-related encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome is a multi-system disorder characterized primarily by congenital or early-onset lactic acidosis and growth failure, feeding difficulty, hypotonia, and global developmental delay. Other neurologic manifestations can include seizures, movement disorders, ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stroke-like episodes. All affected individuals alive at the time they were reported (median age: 3.5 years) demonstrated significant global developmental delay. Other findings can involve the heart (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart malformations, arrhythmias), liver (mildly elevated transaminases), eyes (cataract, strabismus, nystagmus, optic atrophy), hearing (sensorineural hearing loss), and bone marrow (neutropenia, lymphopenia). Survival varies; the median age of reported deaths was two years (range 2 days - 75 months), although surviving individuals as old as 36 years have been reported. To date FBXL4-related mtDNA depletion syndrome has been reported in 50 individuals.
Van Maldergem syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
816205
Concept ID:
C3809875
Disease or Syndrome
Van Maldergem syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intellectual disability, typical craniofacial features, auditory malformations resulting in hearing loss, and skeletal and limb malformations. Some patients have renal hypoplasia. Brain MRI typically shows periventricular nodular heterotopia (summary by Cappello et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Van Maldergem syndrome, see 601390.
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 23
MedGen UID:
816736
Concept ID:
C3810406
Disease or Syndrome
Osteochondrodysplasia, complex lethal, symoens-barnes-gistelinck type
MedGen UID:
900688
Concept ID:
C4225162
Disease or Syndrome
Complex lethal osteochondrodysplasia of the Symoens-Barnes-Gistelinck type is characterized by severe skeletal osteopenia, microcephaly, multiple fractures, and congenital anomalies including ascites, pleural effusion, and intracranial ventriculomegaly (Symoens et al., 2015).
Skin creases, congenital symmetric circumferential, 2
MedGen UID:
902880
Concept ID:
C4225225
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital symmetric circumferential skin creases is characterized by the folding of excess skin, which leads to ringed creases, primarily of the limbs. Affected individuals also exhibit intellectual disability, cleft palate, and dysmorphic features (summary by Isrie et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital symmetric circumferential skin creases, see CSCSC1 (156610).
Basel-Vanagaite-Smirin-Yosef syndrome
MedGen UID:
897292
Concept ID:
C4225323
Disease or Syndrome
Basel-Vanagaite-Smirin-Yosef syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development resulting in mental retardation, as well as variable eye, brain, cardiac, and palatal abnormalities (summary by Basel-Vanagaite et al., 2015).
Mirage syndrome
MedGen UID:
924576
Concept ID:
C4284088
Disease or Syndrome
MIRAGE syndrome is a form of syndromic adrenal hypoplasia, characterized by myelodysplasia, infection, restriction of growth, adrenal hypoplasia, genital phenotypes, and enteropathy. The condition is often fatal within the first decade of life, usually as a result of invasive infection (Narumi et al., 2016).
Short stature, rhizomelic, with microcephaly, micrognathia, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
934653
Concept ID:
C4310686
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-gorlin syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
934705
Concept ID:
C4310738
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart
MedGen UID:
934739
Concept ID:
C4310772
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by onset in infancy of developmental delay, intellectual disability, and behavioral disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. About half of patients have additional abnormalities, most commonly involving the eye, heart, and genitourinary system. The phenotype is reminiscent of that observed in patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome (607872); RERE is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region (summary by Fregeau et al., 2016).
Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
934766
Concept ID:
C4310799
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent infections in childhood and variable dysmorphic facial features. Laboratory studies show hypomethylation of certain chromosomal regions. Additional features, including delayed development, are variable (summary by Thijssen et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome, see ICF1 (242860).
Townes-Brocks syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1381939
Concept ID:
C4479534
Disease or Syndrome
Cryptomicrotia brachydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
377678
Concept ID:
C1852454
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome describes a combination of malformations that include bilateral cryptomicrotia (recessed, hidden and small or absent ears), brachytelomesophalangy with short middle and distal phalanges of digits two through five, hypoplastic toenails and excess fingertip arch patterns. The syndrome has been reported in one family (mother and son). There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1988.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Yuan S, Meng L, Zhang Y, Tu C, Du J, Li W, Liang P, Lu G, Tan YQ
Steroids 2017 Sep;125:61-66. Epub 2017 Jun 27 doi: 10.1016/j.steroids.2017.06.010. PMID: 28663096
Taicher BM, Routh JC, Eck JB, Ross SS, Wiener JS, Ross AK
Paediatr Anaesth 2017 Jul;27(7):688-694. Epub 2017 Mar 27 doi: 10.1111/pan.13119. PMID: 28345802Free PMC Article
van der Horst HJ, de Wall LL
Eur J Pediatr 2017 Apr;176(4):435-441. Epub 2017 Feb 11 doi: 10.1007/s00431-017-2864-5. PMID: 28190103Free PMC Article
Singal AK, Jain VG, Gazali Z, Shekhawat P
Hum Reprod 2016 Jul;31(7):1406-10. Epub 2016 May 10 doi: 10.1093/humrep/dew115. PMID: 27165620
Singal AK, Dubey M, Jain V
World J Urol 2016 Jul;34(7):1019-24. Epub 2015 Sep 22 doi: 10.1007/s00345-015-1686-1. PMID: 26394625

Diagnosis

van der Horst HJ, de Wall LL
Eur J Pediatr 2017 Apr;176(4):435-441. Epub 2017 Feb 11 doi: 10.1007/s00431-017-2864-5. PMID: 28190103Free PMC Article
Örtqvist L, Fossum M, Andersson M, Nordenström A, Frisén L, Holmdahl G, Nordenskjöld A
Andrology 2017 Mar;5(2):286-293. Epub 2016 Dec 19 doi: 10.1111/andr.12309. PMID: 27992969
Snodgrass WT, Bush NC
Urol Clin North Am 2017 Feb;44(1):105-111. doi: 10.1016/j.ucl.2016.08.014. PMID: 27908364
Lu YC, Huang WY, Chen YF, Chang HC, Pong YH, Shih TH, Huang KH
Asian J Surg 2017 Apr;40(2):116-122. Epub 2016 Jan 26 doi: 10.1016/j.asjsur.2015.07.010. PMID: 26825262
Elmoghazy H, Hussein MM, Mohamed E, Badawy A, Alsagheer G, Abd Elhamed AM
Int Urol Nephrol 2016 Dec;48(12):1943-1949. Epub 2016 Sep 13 doi: 10.1007/s11255-016-1416-7. PMID: 27623810

Therapy

Zheng D, Fu S, Li W, Xie M, Guo J, Yao H, Wang Z
Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Nov;96(47):e8238. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000008238. PMID: 29381913Free PMC Article
Taicher BM, Routh JC, Eck JB, Ross SS, Wiener JS, Ross AK
Paediatr Anaesth 2017 Jul;27(7):688-694. Epub 2017 Mar 27 doi: 10.1111/pan.13119. PMID: 28345802Free PMC Article
Lu YC, Huang WY, Chen YF, Chang HC, Pong YH, Shih TH, Huang KH
Asian J Surg 2017 Apr;40(2):116-122. Epub 2016 Jan 26 doi: 10.1016/j.asjsur.2015.07.010. PMID: 26825262
Elmoghazy H, Hussein MM, Mohamed E, Badawy A, Alsagheer G, Abd Elhamed AM
Int Urol Nephrol 2016 Dec;48(12):1943-1949. Epub 2016 Sep 13 doi: 10.1007/s11255-016-1416-7. PMID: 27623810
Singal AK, Jain VG, Gazali Z, Shekhawat P
Hum Reprod 2016 Jul;31(7):1406-10. Epub 2016 May 10 doi: 10.1093/humrep/dew115. PMID: 27165620

Prognosis

Örtqvist L, Andersson M, Strandqvist A, Nordenström A, Frisén L, Holmdahl G, Nordenskjöld A
J Pediatr Urol 2017 Feb;13(1):79.e1-79.e7. Epub 2016 Sep 9 doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.08.008. PMID: 28087231
Jaber J, Kocherov S, Chertin L, Farkas A, Chertin B
J Pediatr Urol 2017 Feb;13(1):78.e1-78.e5. Epub 2016 Oct 5 doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.08.020. PMID: 27887915
Lu YC, Huang WY, Chen YF, Chang HC, Pong YH, Shih TH, Huang KH
Asian J Surg 2017 Apr;40(2):116-122. Epub 2016 Jan 26 doi: 10.1016/j.asjsur.2015.07.010. PMID: 26825262
Kanematsu A, Higuchi Y, Tanaka S, Hashimoto T, Nojima M, Yamamoto S
J Sex Med 2016 Oct;13(10):1488-95. Epub 2016 Aug 18 doi: 10.1016/j.jsxm.2016.07.014. PMID: 27545860
Hashimoto Y, Kawai M, Nagai S, Matsukura T, Niwa F, Hasegawa T, Heike T
Pediatr Int 2016 Jul;58(7):573-7. Epub 2016 Feb 4 doi: 10.1111/ped.12864. PMID: 26634292

Clinical prediction guides

Zheng D, Fu S, Li W, Xie M, Guo J, Yao H, Wang Z
Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Nov;96(47):e8238. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000008238. PMID: 29381913Free PMC Article
Yuan S, Meng L, Zhang Y, Tu C, Du J, Li W, Liang P, Lu G, Tan YQ
Steroids 2017 Sep;125:61-66. Epub 2017 Jun 27 doi: 10.1016/j.steroids.2017.06.010. PMID: 28663096
Örtqvist L, Andersson M, Strandqvist A, Nordenström A, Frisén L, Holmdahl G, Nordenskjöld A
J Pediatr Urol 2017 Feb;13(1):79.e1-79.e7. Epub 2016 Sep 9 doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.08.008. PMID: 28087231
Lu YC, Huang WY, Chen YF, Chang HC, Pong YH, Shih TH, Huang KH
Asian J Surg 2017 Apr;40(2):116-122. Epub 2016 Jan 26 doi: 10.1016/j.asjsur.2015.07.010. PMID: 26825262
Singal AK, Jain VG, Gazali Z, Shekhawat P
Hum Reprod 2016 Jul;31(7):1406-10. Epub 2016 May 10 doi: 10.1093/humrep/dew115. PMID: 27165620

Recent systematic reviews

Fernández N, Pérez J, Monterrey P, Poletta FA, Bägli DJ, Lorenzo AJ, Zarante I
Int Braz J Urol 2017 Mar-Apr;43(2):325-334. PMID: 27802003Free PMC Article
Faasse MA, Johnson EK, Bowen DK, Lindgren BW, Maizels M, Marcus CR, Jovanovic BD, Yerkes EB
J Pediatr Urol 2016 Aug;12(4):202.e1-5. Epub 2016 May 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.04.017. PMID: 27321557
Long CJ, Canning DA
J Pediatr Urol 2016 Aug;12(4):196.e1-5. Epub 2016 May 26 doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2016.05.002. PMID: 27296789
Keays MA, Starke N, Lee SC, Bernstein I, Snodgrass WT, Bush NC
J Urol 2016 Apr;195(4 Pt 2):1215-20. Epub 2016 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2015.11.066. PMID: 26926541
Springer A, van den Heijkant M, Baumann S
J Pediatr Urol 2016 Jun;12(3):152.e1-7. Epub 2015 Dec 31 doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2015.12.002. PMID: 26810252

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