Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 72

1.

Vandetanib

An orally bioavailable 4-anilinoquinazoline. Vandetanib selectively inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), thereby blocking VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation and migration and reducing tumor vessel permeability. This agent also blocks the tyrosine kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a receptor tyrosine kinase that mediates tumor cell proliferation and migration and angiogenesis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
351509
Concept ID:
C1628324
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

thyroid cancer

MedGen UID:
880181
Concept ID:
CN235603
Finding
3.

Thyroid cancer

MedGen UID:
808135
Concept ID:
CN221577
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Medullary thyroid carcinoma

The presence of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505380
Concept ID:
CN002590
Finding
5.

Metastatic Adenocarcinoma

An adenocarcinoma which has spread from its original site of growth to another anatomic site. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87204
Concept ID:
C0334277
Neoplastic Process
6.

Medullary thyroid carcinoma

The presence of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66772
Concept ID:
C0238462
Neoplastic Process
7.

Course of illness

Stages or progression of physical or mental disorders. Compare PROGNOSIS. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
116631
Concept ID:
C0242656
Pathologic Function
8.

Thyroid carcinoma

Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. It makes hormones that help the body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater risk if you. -Are between ages 25 and 65. -Are a woman. -Are Asian. -Have a family member who has had thyroid disease. -Have had radiation treatments to your head or neck. You should see a doctor if you have a lump or swelling in your neck. Doctors use a physical exam, thyroid tests, other blood and imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you have and how far the cancer has spread. Many patients receive a combination of treatments. They may include surgery, radioactive iodine, hormone treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
107811
Concept ID:
C0549473
Neoplastic Process
9.

Epidermal growth factor

A protein made by many cells in the body and by some types of tumors. It causes cells to grow and differentiate (become more specialized). It is a type of growth factor and a type of cytokine. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66867
Concept ID:
C0242275
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Hormone; Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Fatigue

Everyone feels tired now and then. Sometimes you may just want to stay in bed. But, after a good night's sleep, most people feel refreshed and ready to face a new day. If you continue to feel tired for weeks, it's time to see your doctor. He or she may be able to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it. Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include. -Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, antihistamines, and medicines for nausea and pain. -Having medical treatments, like chemotherapy and radiation. -Recovering from major surgery. -Anxiety, stress, or depression. -Staying up too late. -Drinking too much alcohol or too many caffeinated drinks. -Pregnancy. One disorder that causes extreme fatigue is chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that goes away after you rest. Instead, it lasts a long time and limits your ability to do ordinary daily activities. NIH: National Institute on Aging.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41971
Concept ID:
C0015672
Sign or Symptom
11.

Nausea

A sensation of unease in the stomach together with an urge to vomit. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
10196
Concept ID:
C0027497
Sign or Symptom
12.

Diarrhea

What is diarrhea? Diarrhea is loose, watery stools (bowel movements). You have diarrhea if you have loose stools three or more times in one day. Acute diarrhea is diarrhea that lasts a short time. It is a common problem. It usually lasts about one or two days, but it may last longer. Then it goes away on its own. Diarrhea lasting more than a few days may be a sign of a more serious problem. Chronic diarrhea -- diarrhea that lasts at least four weeks -- can be a symptom of a chronic disease. Chronic diarrhea symptoms may be continual, or they may come and go. Who gets diarrhea? People of all ages can get diarrhea. On average, adults In the United States have acute diarrhea once a year. Young children have it an average of twice a year. People who visit developing countries are at risk for traveler's diarrhea. It is caused by consuming contaminated food or water. What causes diarrhea? The most common causes of diarrhea include. -Bacteria from contaminated food or water. -Viruses such as the flu, norovirus, or rotavirus . Rotavirus is the most common cause of acute diarrhea in children. -Parasites, which are tiny organisms found in contaminated food or water. -Medicines such as antibiotics, cancer drugs, and antacids that contain magnesium. -Food intolerances and sensitivities, which are problems digesting certain ingredients or foods. An example is lactose intolerance. -Diseases that affect the stomach, small intestine, or colon, such as Crohn's disease. -Problems with how the colon functions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Some people also get diarrhea after stomach surgery, because sometimes the surgeries can cause food to move through your digestive system more quickly. Sometimes no cause can be found. If your diarrhea goes away within a few days, finding the cause is usually not necessary. What other symptoms might I have with diarrhea? Other possible symptoms of diarrhea include. -Cramps or pain in the abdomen. -An urgent need to use the bathroom. -Loss of bowel control. If a virus or bacteria is the cause of your diarrhea, you may also have a fever, chills, and bloody stools. Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means that your body does not have enough fluid to work properly. Dehydration can be serious, especially for children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. When should I see a doctor for diarrhea? Although it is usually not harmful, diarrhea can become dangerous or signal a more serious problem. Contact your health care provider if you have. -Signs of dehydration. -Diarrhea for more than 2 days, if you are an adult. For children, contact the provider if it lasts more than 24 hours. -Severe pain in your abdomen or rectum (for adults). -A fever of 102 degrees or higher. -Stools containing blood or pus. -Stools that are black and tarry. If children have diarrhea, parents or caregivers should not hesitate to call a health care provider. Diarrhea can be especially dangerous in newborns and infants. How is the cause of diarrhea diagnosed? To find the cause of diarrhea, your health care provider may. -Do a physical exam. -Ask about any medicines you are taking. -Test your stool or blood to look for bacteria, parasites, or other signs of disease or infection. -Ask you to stop eating certain foods to see whether your diarrhea goes away. If you have chronic diarrhea, your health care provider may perform other tests to look for signs of disease. What are the treatments for diarrhea? Diarrhea is treated by replacing lost fluids and electrolytes to prevent dehydration. Depending on the cause of the problem, you may need medicines to stop the diarrhea or treat an infection. Adults with diarrhea should drink water, fruit juices, sports drinks, sodas without caffeine, and salty broths. As your symptoms improve, you can eat soft, bland food. Children with diarrhea should be given oral rehydration solutions to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. Can diarrhea be prevented? Two types of diarrhea can be prevented - rotavirus diarrhea and traveler's diarrhea. There are vaccines for rotavirus. They are given to babies in two or three doses. You can help prevent traveler's diarrhea by being careful about what you eat and drink when you are in developing countries:. -Use only bottled or purified water for drinking, making ice cubes, and brushing your teeth. -If you do use tap water, boil it or use iodine tablets. -Make sure that the cooked food you eat is fully cooked and served hot. -Avoid unwashed or unpeeled raw fruits and vegetables. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8360
Concept ID:
C0011991
Sign or Symptom
13.

Carcinoma

A malignant tumor arising from epithelial cells. Carcinomas that arise from glandular epithelium are called adenocarcinomas, those that arise from squamous epithelium are called squamous cell carcinomas, and those that arise from transitional epithelium are called transitional cell carcinomas (NCI Thesaurus). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
14.

Calcitonin

A peptide hormone that lowers calcium concentration in the blood. In humans, it is released by thyroid cells and acts to decrease the formation and absorptive activity of osteoclasts. Its role in regulating plasma calcium is much greater in children and in certain diseases than in normal adults. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2405
Concept ID:
C0006668
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Hormone; Pharmacologic Substance
15.

Carcinoma

MedGen UID:
910818
Concept ID:
CN241453
Finding
16.

Thyroid carcinoma

The presence of a carcinoma of the thyroid gland. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505391
Concept ID:
CN002613
Finding
17.

Withdrawal (dysfunction)

A social or emotional detachment, pathological retreat from objective reality, interpersonal contact and social involvement, as in some forms of schizophrenia, depression, or schizoid, avoidant, or schizotypal personality disorders. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
442895
Concept ID:
C2825032
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is classified into three subtypes: MEN 2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma), and MEN 2B. All three subtypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN 2A and MEN 2B have an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN 2A has an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN 2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and a ‘marfanoid’ habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN 2B, early adulthood in MEN 2A, and middle age in FMTC. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
322311
Concept ID:
C1833921
Neoplastic Process
19.

Receptor Signaling

An intercellular process that involves a cellular receptor binding to a cognate ligand and results in a specific cellular response. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
271464
Concept ID:
C1514762
Molecular Function
20.

Adverse event

unintended negative effect of treatments [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
209094
Concept ID:
C0877248
Finding; Pathologic Function
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center