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Items: 6

1.

Bulimia nervosa

Recurrent episodes of over-eating. [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
389218
Concept ID:
C2267227
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Binge eating disorder

A disorder associated with three or more of the following: eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry; eating much more rapidly than normal; eating alone due to embarrassment; feeling of disgust, DEPRESSION, or guilt after overeating. Criteria includes occurrence on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behavior (i.e. purging, excessive exercise, etc.) and does not co-occur exclusively with BULIMIA NERVOSA or ANOREXIA NERVOSA. (From DSM-IV, 1994) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
154543
Concept ID:
C0596170
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Bulimia

A form of anomalous eating behavior characterized by binge eating is followed by self-induced vomiting or other compensatory behavior intended to prevent weight gain (purging, fasting or exercising or a combination of these). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
684
Concept ID:
C0006370
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
6.

Eating disorder

Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay healthy. They also involve extreme concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include. -Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too thin, but you don't eat enough because you think you are fat . -Bulimia nervosa, which involves periods of overeating followed by purging, sometimes through self-induced vomiting or using laxatives. -Binge-eating, which is out-of-control eating. Women are more likely than men to have eating disorders. They usually start in the teenage years and often occur along with depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse. Eating disorders can lead to heart and kidney problems and even death. Getting help early is important. Treatment involves monitoring, talk therapy, nutritional counseling, and sometimes medicines. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4434
Concept ID:
C0013473
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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