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Items: 17

1.

Meningitis

Meningitis is inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, called the meninges. There are several types of meningitis. The most common is viral meningitis. You get it when a virus enters the body through the nose or mouth and travels to the brain. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but can be deadly. It usually starts with bacteria that cause a cold-like infection. It can cause stroke, hearing loss, and brain damage. It can also harm other organs. Pneumococcal infections and meningococcal infections are the most common causes of bacterial meningitis. Anyone can get meningitis, but it is more common in people with weak immune systems. Meningitis can get serious very quickly. You should get medical care right away if you have. -A sudden high fever . -A severe headache . -A stiff neck . -Nausea or vomiting. Early treatment can help prevent serious problems, including death. Tests to diagnose meningitis include blood tests, imaging tests, and a spinal tap to test cerebrospinal fluid. Antibiotics can treat bacterial meningitis. Antiviral medicines may help some types of viral meningitis. Other medicines can help treat symptoms. There are vaccines to prevent some of the bacterial infections that cause meningitis. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6298
Concept ID:
C0025289
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Neonatal meningitis

MedGen UID:
141580
Concept ID:
C0456107
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Diagnosis

Description:The source act is intended to help establish the presence of a (an adverse) situation described by the target act. This is not limited to diseases but can apply to any adverse situation or condition of medical or technical nature.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
4.

Premature infant

Almost 1 of every 10 infants born in the United States are premature, or preemies. A premature birth is when a baby is born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. A full-term pregnancy is 40 weeks. Important growth and development happen throughout pregnancy - especially in the final months and weeks. Because they are born too early, preemies weigh much less than full-term babies. They may have health problems because their organs did not have enough time to develop. Problems that a baby born too early may have include. -Breathing problems. -Feeding difficulties. -Cerebral palsy. -Developmental delay. -Vision problems. -Hearing problems. Preemies need special medical care in a neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU. They stay there until their organ systems can work on their own. . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5794
Concept ID:
C0021294
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Antimicrobial substance

Any substance or process that kills germs (bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that can cause infection and disease). [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
209727
Concept ID:
C1136254
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Bacterial infection of central nervous system

Bacterial infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges, including infections involving the perimeningeal spaces. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199829
Concept ID:
C0752180
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Disease due to Gram-negative bacteria

Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88406
Concept ID:
C0085423
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Mycoplasmatales Infections

Infections with bacteria of the order MYCOPLASMATALES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
44542
Concept ID:
C0026945
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Ureaplasma Infections

Infections with bacteria of the genus UREAPLASMA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
43165
Concept ID:
C0085395
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Bacterial meningitis

Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
39048
Concept ID:
C0085437
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Pachymeningitis

MedGen UID:
14570
Concept ID:
C0030167
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Disorder of nervous system

The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood. There are more than 600 neurologic diseases. Major types include. - Diseases caused by faulty genes, such as Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy. - Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida. - Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. - Diseases of the blood vessels that supply the brain, such as stroke. - Injuries to the spinal cord and brain. - Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy . - Cancer, such as brain tumors. - infections, such as meningitis.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14336
Concept ID:
C0027765
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Morphological abnormality of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
15.

CNS infection

Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal infections; PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS; HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2948
Concept ID:
C0007684
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Infections caused by bacteria and fungi, general, specified, or unspecified. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2161
Concept ID:
C0004615
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Anti-Infective Agents

A pharmacological agent that can kill or prevent the reproduction of infectious organisms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
324
Concept ID:
C0003204
Pharmacologic Substance
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