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Items: 15

1.

Sclerosis

A pathological hardening or thickening of tissue, especially that of the interstitial substance. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
48587
Concept ID:
C0036429
Pathologic Function
2.

Multiple sclerosis

A progressive autoimmune disorder affecting the central nervous system resulting in demyelination. Patients develop physical and cognitive impairments that correspond with the affected nerve fibers. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10123
Concept ID:
C0026769
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Multiple sclerosis susceptibility

Multiple sclerosis is a condition characterized by areas of damage (lesions) on the brain and spinal cord. These lesions are associated with destruction of the covering that protects nerves and promotes the efficient transmission of nerve impulses (the myelin sheath) and damage to nerve cells. Multiple sclerosis is considered an autoimmune disorder; autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs, in this case tissues of the nervous system.Multiple sclerosis usually begins in early adulthood, between ages 20 and 40. The symptoms vary widely, and affected individuals can experience one or more effects of nervous system damage. Multiple sclerosis often causes sensory disturbances in the limbs, including a prickling or tingling sensation (paresthesia), numbness, pain, and itching. Some people experience Lhermitte sign, which is an electrical shock-like sensation that runs down the back and into the limbs. This sensation usually occurs when the head is bent forward. Problems with muscle control are common in people with multiple sclerosis. Affected individuals may have tremors, muscle stiffness (spasticity), exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), weakness or partial paralysis of the muscles of the limbs, difficulty walking, or poor bladder control. Multiple sclerosis is also associated with vision problems, such as blurred or double vision or partial or complete vision loss. Infections that cause fever can make the symptoms worse.There are several forms of multiple sclerosis: relapsing-remitting MS, secondary progressive MS, primary progressive MS, and progressive relapsing MS. The most common is the relapsing-remitting form, which affects approximately 80 percent of people with multiple sclerosis. Individuals with this form of the condition have periods during which they experience symptoms, called clinical attacks, followed by periods without any symptoms (remission). The triggers of clinical attacks and remissions are unknown. After about 10 years, relapsing-remitting MS usually develops into another form of the disorder called secondary progressive MS. In this form, there are no remissions, and symptoms of the condition continually worsen.Primary progressive MS is the next most common form, affecting approximately 10 to 20 percent of people with multiple sclerosis. This form is characterized by constant symptoms that worsen over time, with no clinical attacks or remissions. Primary progressive MS typically begins later than the other forms, around age 40.Progressive relapsing MS is a rare form of multiple sclerosis that initially appears like primary progressive MS, with constant symptoms. However, people with progressive relapsing MS also experience clinical attacks of more severe symptoms. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
429785
Concept ID:
CN031763
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Temporal Concept
5.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
6.

Interferon

Human interferons have been classified into 3 groups: alpha, beta, and gamma. Both alpha- and beta-IFNs, previously designated type I, are acid-stable, but they differ immunologically and in regard to some biologic and physiochemical properties. The IFNs produced by virus-stimulated leukocytes (leukocyte IFNs) are predominantly of the alpha type. Those produced by lymphoblastoid cells are about 90% alpha and 10% beta. Induced fibroblasts produce mainly or exclusively the beta type. The alpha- and beta-IFNs differ widely in amino acid sequence. The gamma or immune IFNs, which are produced by T lymphocytes in response to mitogens or to antigens to which they are sensitized, are acid-labile and serologically distinct from alpha- and beta-IFNs. (from OMIM 147570) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
196514
Concept ID:
C0733470
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Interferon

Proteins secreted by vertebrate cells in response to a wide variety of inducers. They confer resistance against many different viruses, inhibit proliferation of normal and malignant cells, impede multiplication of intracellular parasites, enhance macrophage and granulocyte phagocytosis, augment natural killer cell activity, and show several other immunomodulatory functions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5847
Concept ID:
C0021747
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Demyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS

Conditions characterized by loss or dysfunction of myelin (see MYELIN SHEATH) in the brain, spinal cord, or optic nerves secondary to autoimmune mediated processes. This may take the form of a humoral or cellular immune response directed toward myelin or OLIGODENDROGLIA associated autoantigens. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199756
Concept ID:
C0751873
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Autoimmune Nervous System Disorder

A disorder characterized by the degeneration of the nervous system due to autoimmunity. Representative examples include multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
155946
Concept ID:
C0751871
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
12.

Disorder of nervous system

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder that affects the brain, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
14336
Concept ID:
C0027765
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Demyelinating Disorder

A broad group of disorders that affect the myelin sheaths that cover the neurons. Myelin sheathes cover neuronal axons in the central and peripheral nervous system and function to increase travelling impulse speeds. Disruption of this sheath impairs neuronal transmission and can result in disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Guillain-Barre syndrome, among others. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4189
Concept ID:
C0011303
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Demyelination

Breakdown, or abnormal development, of a nerve fiber myelin sheath. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3720
Concept ID:
C0011304
Pathologic Function
15.

Autoimmune disease

A disorder resulting from loss of function or tissue destruction of an organ or multiple organs, arising from humoral or cellular immune responses of the individual to his own tissue constituents. It may be systemic (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus), or organ specific, (e.g., thyroiditis). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome
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