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Items: 13

1.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
2.

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects your airways. Your airways are tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. If you have asthma, the inside walls of your airways become sore and swollen. That makes them very sensitive, and they may react strongly to things that you are allergic to or find irritating. When your airways react, they get narrower and your lungs get less air. Symptoms of asthma include. -Wheezing. -Coughing, especially early in the morning or at night. -Chest tightness. -Shortness of breath. Not all people who have asthma have these symptoms. Having these symptoms doesn't always mean that you have asthma. Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. You may also have allergy tests. When your asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it's called an asthma attack. Severe asthma attacks may require emergency care, and they can be fatal. Asthma is treated with two kinds of medicines: quick-relief medicines to stop asthma symptoms and long-term control medicines to prevent symptoms. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2109
Concept ID:
C0004096
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Asthma

Asthma is characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to multiple stimuli, leading to narrowing of the air passages with resultant dyspnea, cough, and wheezing. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505101
Concept ID:
CN001900
Finding
4.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Eosinophilia

Increased count of eosinophils in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
41824
Concept ID:
C0014457
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Eosinophilia

A condition in which the number of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) in the blood is greatly increased. Eosinophilia is often a response to infection or allergens (substances that cause an allergic response). [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
412195
Concept ID:
C2240374
Finding; Laboratory or Test Result
7.

Phenotypic variability

A variability of phenotypic features. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
326537
Concept ID:
C1839608
Finding
8.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
9.

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is a broad term that encompasses several common seizure phenotypes, classically including childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, ECA; see 600131), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE, EJA; see 607631), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME, EJM; see 254770), and epilepsy with grand mal seizures on awakening (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy, 1989). These recurrent seizures occur in the absence of detectable brain lesions and/or metabolic abnormalities. Seizures are initially generalized with a bilateral, synchronous, generalized, symmetrical EEG discharge (Zara et al., 1995; Lu and Wang, 2009). See also childhood absence epilepsy (ECA1; 600131), which has also been mapped to 8q24. Of note, benign neonatal epilepsy 2 (EBN2; 121201) is caused by mutation in the KCNQ3 gene (602232) on 8q24. Genetic Heterogeneity of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy EIG1 has been mapped to chromosome 8q24. Other loci or genes associated with EIG include EIG2 (606972) on 14q23; EIG3 (608762) on 9q32; EIG4 (609750) on 10q25; EIG5 (611934) on 10p11; EIG6 (611942), caused by mutation in the CACNA1H gene (607904) on 16p; EIG7 (604827) on 15q14; EIG8 (612899), caused by mutation in the CASR gene (601199) on 3q13.3-q21; EIG9 (607682), caused by mutation in the CACNB4 gene (601949) on 2q22-q23; EIG10 (613060), caused by mutation in the GABRD gene (137163) on 1p36.3; EIG11 (607628), caused by variation in the CLCN2 gene (600570) on 3q36; EIG12 (614847), caused by mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (138140) on 1p34; EIG13 (611136), caused by mutation in the GABRA1 gene (137160) on 5q34; and EIG14 (616685), caused by mutation in the SLC12A5 gene (606726) on 20q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75725
Concept ID:
C0270850
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Obstructive lung disease

Obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
154671
Concept ID:
C0600260
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disorder of bronchus

The bronchi are two tubes that branch off the trachea, or windpipe. The bronchi carry air to your lungs. The most common problem with the bronchi is bronchitis, an inflammation of the tubes. Bronchitis can be acute or chronic. Other problems include. -Bronchiectasis, a condition in which damage to the airways causes them to widen and become flabby and scarred. -Exercise-induced bronchospasm, which happens when the airways shrink while you are exercising. -Bronchiolitis, an inflammation of the small airways that branch off from the bronchi. -Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a condition affecting infants. Treatment of bronchial disorders depends on the cause.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14233
Concept ID:
C0006261
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue gets thick and stiff. That makes it hard for you to catch your breath, and your blood may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue diseases, and interstitial lung disease. Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. In most cases, the cause cannot be found. This is called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Symptoms include. -Shortness of breath. -A dry, hacking cough that doesn't get better. -Fatigue. -Weight loss for no known reason. -Aching muscles and joints. -Clubbing, which is the widening and rounding of the tips of the fingers or toes. Your doctor may use your medical history, imaging tests, a biopsy, and lung function tests to diagnose pulmonary fibrosis. There is no cure. Treatments can help with symptoms and improve your quality of life. They include medicines, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, or a lung transplant. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11028
Concept ID:
C0034069
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Disorder of lung

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States. The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7399
Concept ID:
C0024115
Disease or Syndrome
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