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Items: 8

1.

Sarcoma

Your soft tissues connect, support, or surround other tissues. Examples include your muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There are many kinds, based on the type of tissue they started in. They may cause a lump or swelling in the soft tissue. Sometimes they spread and can press on nerves and organs, causing problems such as pain or trouble breathing. No one knows exactly what causes these cancers. They are not common, but you have a higher risk if you have been exposed to certain chemicals, have had radiation therapy, or have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove the tumor, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
224714
Concept ID:
C1261473
Neoplastic Process
2.

Sarcoma

A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas are the main types of sarcoma. Sarcoma is usually highly malignant. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506452
Concept ID:
CN117138
Finding
3.

Synovial sarcoma

Synovial sarcomas, which represent approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas, are aggressive spindle cell sarcomas containing in some cases areas of epithelial differentiation. They consistently show a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2), which usually represents either of 2 gene fusions, SYT (600192)-SSX1 (312820) or SYT-SSX2 (300192), encoding putative transcriptional proteins differing at 13 amino acid positions (summary by Ladanyi et al., 2002). Synovial sarcoma, according to the experience of Enzinger and Weiss (1983), is the fourth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. It usually develops in adolescents and young adults, is more common in males than in females, and has no racial predilection. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
21050
Concept ID:
C0039101
Neoplastic Process
4.

Soft tissue sarcoma

A type of sarcoma (A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells) that develops from soft tissues like fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues, blood vessels, or deep skin tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
834127
Concept ID:
CN231375
Finding
5.

Synovial sarcoma

A type of mesenchymal tissue cell tumor that exhibits epithelial differentiation, which most frequently arises in the extremities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
775849
Concept ID:
CN183091
Finding
6.

Short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism, and hypotrichosis

SOFT syndrome is characterized by severely short long bones, peculiar facies associated with paucity of hair, and nail anomalies. Growth retardation is evident on prenatal ultrasound as early as the second trimester of pregnancy, and affected individuals reach a final stature consistent with a height age of 6 years to 8 years. Relative macrocephaly is present during early childhood but head circumference is markedly low by adulthood. Psychomotor development is normal. Facial dysmorphism includes a long, triangular face with prominent nose and small ears, and affected individuals have an unusual high-pitched voice. Clinodactyly, brachydactyly, and hypoplastic distal phalanges and fingernails are present in association with postpubertal sparse and short hair. Typical skeletal findings include short and thick long bones with mild irregular metaphyseal changes, short femoral necks, and hypoplastic pelvis and sacrum. All long bones of the hand are short, with major delay of carpal ossification and cone-shaped epiphyses. Vertebral body ossification is also delayed (summary by Sarig et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762199
Concept ID:
C3542022
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Fibroma

Benign tumors that are composed of fibrous or connective tissue. They can grow in all organs, arising from mesenchyme tissue. The term \ [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506388
Concept ID:
CN009440
Finding
8.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia

An inherited condition that may result in the development of cancers of the endocrine system. There are several types of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, and patients with each type may develop different types of cancer. The altered genes that cause each type can be detected with a blood test. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45036
Concept ID:
C0027662
Neoplastic Process
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