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Items: 1 to 20 of 22

1.

Malignant Lung Neoplasm

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and the earlier you started smoking, the greater your risk of lung cancer. High levels of pollution, radiation and asbestos exposure may also increase risk. . Common symptoms of lung cancer include. -A cough that doesn't go away and gets worse over time. -Constant chest pain. -Coughing up blood. -Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. -Repeated problems with pneumonia or bronchitis. -Swelling of the neck and face. -Loss of appetite or weight loss. -Fatigue. Doctors diagnose lung cancer using a physical exam, imaging, and lab tests. Treatment depends on the type, stage, and how advanced it is. Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
66885
Concept ID:
C0242379
Neoplastic Process
2.

lung cancer

MedGen UID:
880193
Concept ID:
CN235597
Finding
3.

Detected

The measurement of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign above the limit of detection of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
617726
Concept ID:
C0442726
Finding
4.

Furriers lung

MedGen UID:
538594
Concept ID:
C0264476
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Coffee-workers lung

MedGen UID:
538589
Concept ID:
C0264468
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Malt-workers lung

MedGen UID:
510125
Concept ID:
C0155888
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Cheese-washers lung

MedGen UID:
507549
Concept ID:
C0007969
Disease or Syndrome
8.

EGFR-related lung cancer

MedGen UID:
472093
Concept ID:
CN130014
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and worldwide. The 2 major forms of lung cancer are nonsmall cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer (see 182280), which account for 85% and 15% of all lung cancers, respectively. Nonsmall cell lung cancer can be divided into 3 major histologic subtypes: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell lung cancer. Cigarette smoking causes all types of lung cancer, but it is most strongly linked with small cell lung cancer and squamous cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in patients who have never smoked. Nonsmall cell lung cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis (summary by Herbst et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
195765
Concept ID:
C0684249
Neoplastic Process
10.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Temporal Concept
11.

Epidermal growth factor

A 6-kDa polypeptide growth factor initially discovered in mouse submaxillary glands. Human epidermal growth factor was originally isolated from urine based on its ability to inhibit gastric secretion and called urogastrone. Epidermal growth factor exerts a wide variety of biological effects including the promotion of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal and EPITHELIAL CELLS. It is synthesized as a transmembrane protein which can be cleaved to release a soluble active form. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
66867
Concept ID:
C0242275
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Hormone; Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Tyrosine

A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21746
Concept ID:
C0041485
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Heterogeneous

The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67020
Concept ID:
C0242960
Organism Attribute
14.

Negative

An absence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure. [Note: Negative does not necessarily imply the complete absence of the specified item.].  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
61377
Concept ID:
C0205160
Finding
15.

Non-small cell lung cancer

Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the lungs become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Lung cancer may or may not cause signs or symptoms in its early stages. Some people with lung cancer have chest pain, frequent coughing, breathing problems, trouble swallowing or speaking, blood in the mucus, loss of appetite and weight loss, fatigue, or swelling in the face or neck. Lung cancer occurs most often in adults in their sixties or seventies. Most people who develop lung cancer have a history of long-term tobacco smoking; however, the condition can occur in people who have never smoked.Lung cancer is generally divided into two types, small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, based on the size of the affected cells when viewed under a microscope. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 85 percent of lung cancer, while small cell lung cancer accounts for the remaining 15 percent.Small cell lung cancer grows quickly and often spreads to other tissues (metastasizes), most commonly to the adrenal glands (small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney), liver, brain, and bones. In more than half of cases, the small cell lung cancer has spread beyond the lung at the time of diagnosis. After diagnosis, most people with small cell lung cancer survive for about one year; less than seven percent survive 5 years.Non-small cell lung cancer is divided into three main subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma arises from the cells that line the small air sacs (alveoli) located throughout the lungs. Squamous cell carcinoma arises from the squamous cells that line the passages leading from the windpipe to the lungs (bronchi). Large cell carcinoma describes non-small cell lung cancers that do not appear to be adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas. As the name suggests, the tumor cells are large when viewed under a microscope. The 5-year survival rate for people with non-small cell lung cancer is usually between 11 and 17 percent; it can be lower or higher depending on the subtype and stage of the cancer.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
40104
Concept ID:
C0007131
Neoplastic Process
16.

Respiratory Tract Diseases

Diseases involving the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19750
Concept ID:
C0035242
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Thoracic Neoplasm

New abnormal growth of tissue in the THORAX. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11793
Concept ID:
C0039981
Neoplastic Process
18.

Neoplasm of the respiratory system

New abnormal growth of tissue in the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11200
Concept ID:
C0035244
Neoplastic Process
19.

Neoplasm of lung

Tumor of the lung. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7400
Concept ID:
C0024121
Neoplastic Process
20.

Disorder of lung

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States. The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7399
Concept ID:
C0024115
Disease or Syndrome
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