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Neoplasm

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Finding; Neoplastic Process
Synonyms: Cancer; Neoplasia; Oncological abnormality; Oncology
SNOMED CT: Primary malignant neoplasm (372087000); Malignant tumor morphology (86049000); Cancer morphology (86049000); Neoplasm, malignant (86049000); Malignancy (86049000); Cancer (86049000); Unclassified tumor, malignant (86049000); Tumor, malignant (86049000); Malignant neoplasm (86049000); Malignant neoplasm, primary (86049000); Neoplasm, malignant (primary) (86049000)
 
HPO: HP:0002664

Definition

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

Conditions with this feature

Chylous ascites
MedGen UID:
969
Concept ID:
C0008732
Disease or Syndrome
Extravasation of chyle into the peritoneal cavity.
Paget disease, extramammary
MedGen UID:
45280
Concept ID:
C0030186
Neoplastic Process
A rare cutaneous neoplasm that occurs in the elderly. It develops more frequently in women and predominantly involves apocrine gland-bearing areas, especially the vulva, scrotum, and perianal areas. The lesions develop as erythematous scaly patches that progress to crusted, pruritic, erythematous plaques. The clinical differential diagnosis includes squamous cell carcinoma in situ and superficial fungal infection. It is generally thought to be an adenocarcinoma of the epidermis, from which it extends into the contiguous epithelium of hair follicles and eccrine sweat ducts. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1478)
Pheochromocytoma
MedGen UID:
18419
Concept ID:
C0031511
Neoplastic Process
Hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma (PGL/PCC) syndromes are characterized by paragangliomas (tumors that arise from neuroendocrine tissues symmetrically distributed along the paravertebral axis from the base of the skull to the pelvis) and by pheochromocytomas (paragangliomas that are confined to the adrenal medulla). Sympathetic paragangliomas hypersecrete catecholamines; parasympathetic paragangliomas are most often nonsecretory. Extra-adrenal parasympathetic paragangliomas are located predominantly in the skull base, neck, and upper medistinum; approximately 95% of such tumors are nonsecretory. In contrast, sympathetic extra-adrenal paragangliomas are generally confined to the lower mediastinum, abdomen, and pelvis, and are typically secretory. Pheochromocytomas, which arise from the adrenal medulla, typically hypersecrete catecholamines. Symptoms of PGL/PCC result either from mass effects or catecholamine hypersecretion (e.g., sustained or paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure, headache, episodic profuse sweating, forceful palpitations, pallor, and apprehension or anxiety). The risk for malignant transformation is greater for extra-adrenal sympathetic paragangliomas than for pheochromocytomas or skull base and neck paragangliomas.
Pityriasis rubra pilaris
MedGen UID:
45939
Concept ID:
C0032027
Disease or Syndrome
Pityriasis rubra pilaris is an uncommon skin disorder characterized by the appearance of keratotic follicular papules, well-demarcated salmon-colored erythematous plaques covered with fine powdery scales interspersed with distinct islands of uninvolved skin, and palmoplantar keratoderma. Most cases are sporadic, although up to 6.5% of PRP-affected individuals report a positive family history. The rare familial cases show autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable expression: the disorder is usually present at birth or appears during the first years of life and is characterized by prominent follicular hyperkeratosis, diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma, and erythema, with only a modest response to treatment (summary by Fuchs-Telem et al., 2012).
Classic Kaposi sarcoma
MedGen UID:
11321
Concept ID:
C0036220
Neoplastic Process
Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an invasive angioproliferative inflammatory condition that occurs commonly in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; see 609423). In the early stages of KS, lesions appear reactive and are stimulated to grow by the actions of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In the late stages of KS, a malignant phenotype that appears to be monoclonal can develop. Infection with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), also known as KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is necessary but not sufficient for KS development. Coinfection with HIV markedly increases the likelihood of KS development, and additional environmental, hormonal, and genetic cofactors likely contribute to its pathogenesis (summary by Foster et al., 2000). Suthaus et al. (2012) noted that HHV-8 is the etiologic agent not only of KS, but also of primary effusion lymphoma and plasma cell-type multicentric Castleman disease (MCD).
Androgen resistance syndrome
MedGen UID:
21102
Concept ID:
C0039585
Disease or Syndrome
Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is typically characterized by evidence of feminization (i.e., undermasculinization) of the external genitalia at birth, abnormal secondary sexual development in puberty, and infertility in individuals with a 46,XY karyotype. AIS represents a spectrum of defects in androgen action and can be subdivided into three broad phenotypes: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), with typical female external genitalia. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) with predominantly female, predominantly male, or ambiguous external genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity syndrome (MAIS) with typical male external genitalia.
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
MedGen UID:
21921
Concept ID:
C0043194
Disease or Syndrome
The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities.
X-linked ichthyosis with steryl-sulfatase deficiency
MedGen UID:
86937
Concept ID:
C0079588
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked ichthyosis is clinically characterized by widespread, dark brown, polygonal scales and generalized dryness. Cutaneous manifestations are present soon after birth and usually do not improve with age. The histopathology of XLI typically shows compact hyperkeratosis and slight acanthosis with a normal granular layer (summary by Takeichi and Akiyama, 2016). X-linked ichthyosis is fundamentally the same disorder as placental steroid sulfatase deficiency, which is often first noted in the pregnant mother of affected males by decreased estrogen or delayed progression of parturition (Alperin and Shapiro, 1997). This is thus an example of affinity ('lumping') of phenotypes thought previously to be separate, the opposite of genetic heterogeneity. Schnyder (1970) gave a useful classification of the inherited ichthyoses. Hernandez-Martin et al. (1999) provided a comprehensive review of X-linked ichthyosis. They pointed out that among all genetic disorders X-linked ichthyosis shows one of the highest ratios of chromosomal deletions; complete deletion has been found in up to 90% of patients. Takeichi and Akiyama (2016) reviewed inherited nonsyndromic forms of ichthyosis.
Partial albinism
MedGen UID:
36361
Concept ID:
C0080024
Disease or Syndrome
Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant trait characterized by the congenital absence of melanocytes in affected areas of the skin and hair. A white forelock of hair, often triangular in shape, may be the only manifestation, or both the hair and the underlying forehead may be involved. The eyebrows and eyelashes may be affected. Irregularly shaped white patches may be observed on the face, trunk, and extremities, usually in a symmetrical distribution. Typically, islands of hyperpigmentation are present within and at the border of depigmented areas (summary by Thomas et al., 2004).
Aase Smith syndrome
MedGen UID:
66316
Concept ID:
C0220686
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked agammaglobulinemia
MedGen UID:
65123
Concept ID:
C0221026
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections in affected males in the first two years of life. Recurrent otitis is the most common infection prior to diagnosis. Conjunctivitis, sinopulmonary infections, diarrhea, and skin infections are also frequently seen. Approximately 60% of individuals with XLA are recognized as having immunodeficiency when they develop a severe, life-threatening infection such as pneumonia, empyema, meningitis, sepsis, cellulitis, or septic arthritis. S pneumoniae and H influenzae are the most common organisms found prior to diagnosis and may continue to cause sinusitis and otitis after diagnosis and the initiation of gammaglobulin substitution therapy. Severe, difficult-to-treat enteroviral infections (often manifest as dermatomyositis or chronic meningoencephalitis) can be prevented by this treatment. The prognosis for individuals with XLA has improved markedly in the last 25 years as a result of earlier diagnosis, the development of preparations of gammaglobulin that allow normal concentrations of serum IgG to be achieved, and more liberal use of antibiotics.
Yellow nail syndrome
MedGen UID:
113164
Concept ID:
C0221348
Disease or Syndrome
Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is classically considered to comprise a clinical triad of yellow nails, lymphedema, and respiratory tract involvement. Two of these symptoms are required for the diagnosis, since the complete triad is only observed in about one-third of patients. Onset is usually after puberty (Hoque et al., 2007).
Carcinoma of cervix
MedGen UID:
86222
Concept ID:
C0302592
Neoplastic Process
The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by several types of a virus called human papillomaviruses (HPV). The virus spreads through sexual contact. Most women's bodies are able to fight HPV infection. But sometimes the virus leads to cancer. You're at higher risk if you smoke, have many children, use birth control pills for a long time, or have HIV infection. . Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first, but later, you may have pelvic pain or bleeding from the vagina. It usually takes several years for normal cells in the cervix to turn into cancer cells. Your health care provider can find abnormal cells by doing a Pap test - examining cells from the cervix under a microscope. By getting regular Pap tests and pelvic exams you can find and treat changing cells before they turn into cancer. A vaccine for girls and young women protects against the four types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Adamantinoma of long bones
MedGen UID:
83163
Concept ID:
C0334556
Neoplastic Process
A low grade malignant neoplasm arising from the long bones. The tibia is the most frequently affected bone site. Patients present with swelling which may or may not be associated with pain. Morphologically, it is characterized by a biphasic pattern consisting of an epithelial and an osteofibrous component. The vast majority of cases recur if they are not treated with radical surgery. In a minority of cases the tumor may metastasize to other anatomic sites including lymph nodes, lungs, liver, brain, and skeleton.
Keratoderma with scleroatrophy of the extremities
MedGen UID:
98360
Concept ID:
C0406767
Congenital Abnormality
Multiple self healing squamous epithelioma
MedGen UID:
154270
Concept ID:
C0546476
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with multiple self-healing squamous epithelioma (MSSE) develop multiple invasive skin tumors that undergo spontaneous regression leaving pitted scars. Age at onset is highly variable, ranging from 8 to 62 years. The disorder shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and most affected families have originated from western Scotland (Bose et al., 2006). MSSE has been considered to be a variety of multiple keratoacanthoma (Biskind et al., 1957; Haydey et al., 1980).
Oxyphilic adenoma
MedGen UID:
307150
Concept ID:
C1510502
Neoplastic Process
Oncocytomas are usually benign tumors that occur in various organs but particularly in the kidneys. Histologic evaluation of renal oncocytomas shows that they are composed entirely of peculiar epithelial cells with granular eosinophilic cytoplasm. Ultrastructural characterization exhibits densely packed cells with mitochondria, which show morphologic differences from those in normal cells. On the average they are larger than those in renal carcinoma cells and their shape is abnormal (summary by Welter et al., 1989).
Disorder due cytochrome p450 CYP2D6 variant
MedGen UID:
449534
Concept ID:
C1827409
Disease or Syndrome
UV-sensitive syndrome
MedGen UID:
322222
Concept ID:
C1833561
Disease or Syndrome
UV-sensitive syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity and mild freckling, without an increased risk of skin tumors. Patient cells show impaired recovery of RNA synthesis (RRS) after UV irradiation due to defective preferential repair of DNA damage in actively transcribing genes, although unscheduled DNA repair is normal. The cellular findings are consistent with a defect in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) of UV damage (summary by Horibata et al., 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of UV-Sensitive Syndrome See also UVSS2 (614621), caused by mutation in the ERCC8 gene (609412) on chromosome 5, and UVSS3 (614640), caused by mutation in the UVSSA gene (614632) on chromosome 4p16.
Oslam syndrome
MedGen UID:
331588
Concept ID:
C1833792
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle myasthenia, autoimmune
MedGen UID:
331795
Concept ID:
C1834635
Disease or Syndrome
Psoriatic arthritis, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
322604
Concept ID:
C1835223
Finding
Psoriasis (177900) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that may have an autoimmune basis. The disorder has a strong but complex genetic basis, with a concordance rate of 50 to 70% among monozygotic twins. Psoriatic arthritis affects more than 10% of patients with psoriasis and, in most cases, there is an association between the severity of the arthritis and the skin involvement (Gudjonsson et al., 2002).
Malaria, cerebral, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
344501
Concept ID:
C1855457
Finding
ALZHEIMER DISEASE, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO (allelic variant)
MedGen UID:
343493
Concept ID:
C1856170
Gene or Genome
Cushing syndrome
MedGen UID:
347456
Concept ID:
C1857451
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an endogenous form of adrenal Cushing syndrome characterized by multiple bilateral adrenocortical nodules that cause a striking enlargement of the adrenal glands. Although some familial cases have been reported, the vast majority of AIMAH cases are sporadic. Patients typically present in the fifth and sixth decades of life, approximately 10 years later than most patients with other causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). Approximately 10 to 15% of adrenal Cushing syndrome is due to primary bilateral ACTH-independent adrenocortical pathology. The 2 main subtypes are AIMAH and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, see 610489), which is often a component of the Carney complex (160980) and associated with mutations in the PRKAR1A gene (188830) on chromosome 17q23-q24. AIMAH is rare, representing less than 1% of endogenous causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). See also ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (615830) due to somatic mutation in the PRKACA gene (601639). Cushing 'disease' (219090) is an ACTH-dependent disorder caused in most cases by pituitary adenomas that secrete excessive ACTH. Genetic Heterogeneity of ACTH-Independent Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia AIMAH2 (615954) is caused by germline mutation of 1 allele of the ARMC5 gene (615549) coupled with a somatic mutation in the other allele.
Spiegler-Brooke syndrome
MedGen UID:
346703
Concept ID:
C1857941
Disease or Syndrome
Brooke-Spiegler syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder classically characterized by the appearance of multiple skin appendage tumors such as cylindroma, trichoepithelioma, and spiradenoma. These tumors are typically located in the head and neck region, appear in early adulthood, and gradually increase in size and number throughout life (Scheinfeld et al., 2003). Because BRSS, familial cylindromatosis, and MFT1 are allelic, and because different manifestations of each have been described within a single family, many consider these disorders to represent a phenotypic spectrum of a single disease entity (Gerretsen et al., 1995; Lee et al., 2005; Bowen et al., 2005; Young et al., 2006; Saggar et al., 2008). Blake and Toro (2009) provided a review of Brooke-Spiegler syndrome and pathogenic mutations in the CYLD gene.
Chromosomal instability with tissue-specific radiosensitivity
MedGen UID:
347797
Concept ID:
C1859091
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS DEMENTIA, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO
MedGen UID:
349874
Concept ID:
C1860698
Gene or Genome
MIGRAINE WITHOUT AURA, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO
MedGen UID:
395955
Concept ID:
C1860699
Gene or Genome
Cancer, familial, with in vitro radioresistance
MedGen UID:
396248
Concept ID:
C1861915
Neoplastic Process
Premature aging Okamoto type
MedGen UID:
356468
Concept ID:
C1866183
Disease or Syndrome
Asthma, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
358271
Concept ID:
C1869116
Finding
Bronchial asthma is the most common chronic disease affecting children and young adults. It is a complex genetic disorder with a heterogeneous phenotype, largely attributed to the interactions among many genes and between these genes and the environment. Asthma-related traits include clinical symptoms of asthma, such as coughing, wheezing, and dyspnea; bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) as assessed by methacholine challenge test; serum IgE levels; atopy; and atopic dermatitis (Laitinen et al., 2001; Illig and Wjst, 2002; Pillai et al., 2006). See 147050 for information on the asthma-associated phenotype atopy.
Hyperimmunoglobulin E recurrent infection syndrome, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
369829
Concept ID:
C1968689
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome (147060) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin abscesses, increased serum IgE, and abnormalities of the connective tissue, skeleton, and dentition (Buckley et al., 1972; Grimbacher et al., 1999). The autosomal recessive form shares hyper-IgE, eosinophilia, and recurrent Staphylococcal infections, but is distinguished from autosomal dominant HIES by the lack of connective tissue and skeletal involvement (Renner et al., 2004). See also TYK2 deficiency (611521), a clinically distinct disease entity that includes characteristic features of both autosomal recessive HIES and mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD; 209950) (Minegishi et al., 2006).
Keratosis, familial actinic
MedGen UID:
390709
Concept ID:
C2675099
Disease or Syndrome
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma 2
MedGen UID:
413336
Concept ID:
C2750548
Neoplastic Process
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a multifactorial malignancy associated with both genetic and environmental factors. The cancer arises from the epithelium of the nasopharynx (summary by Tse et al., 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma, see NPCA1 (607107).
Prostate cancer, hereditary, 1
MedGen UID:
419810
Concept ID:
C2931456
Neoplastic Process
Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually in middle age or later. In this disorder, certain cells in the prostate become abnormal and multiply without control or order to form a tumor. The prostate is a gland that surrounds the male urethra and helps produce semen, the fluid that carries sperm.Early prostate cancer usually does not cause pain, and most affected men exhibit no noticeable symptoms. Men are often diagnosed as the result of health screenings, such as a blood test for a substance called prostate specific antigen (PSA) or a medical procedure called a digital rectal exam. As the tumor grows larger, signs and symptoms can include difficulty starting or stopping the flow of urine, a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely, blood in the urine or semen, or pain with ejaculation. However, these changes can also occur with many other genitourinary conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not necessarily mean that a man has prostate cancer.The severity and outcome of prostate cancer varies widely. Early-stage prostate cancer can usually be treated successfully, and some older men have prostate tumors that grow so slowly that they may never cause health problems during their lifetime, even without treatment. In other men, however, the cancer is much more aggressive; in these cases, prostate cancer can be life-threatening.Some cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers. The signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer depend on where the disease has spread. If prostate cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the lymph nodes, bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Bone metastases of prostate cancer most often cause pain in the lower back, pelvis, or hips.A small percentage of all prostate cancers cluster in families. These hereditary cancers are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary prostate cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.
N syndrome
MedGen UID:
424834
Concept ID:
C2936859
Disease or Syndrome
Common variable immunodeficiency 2
MedGen UID:
461704
Concept ID:
C3150354
Disease or Syndrome
Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is a disorder that impairs the immune system. People with CVID are highly susceptible to infection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, or more rarely, viruses and often develop recurrent infections, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Pneumonia is common in people with CVID. Over time, recurrent infections can lead to chronic lung disease. Affected individuals may also experience infection or inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, which can cause diarrhea and weight loss. Abnormal accumulation of immune cells causes enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) or an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) in some people with CVID. Immune cells can accumulate in other organs, forming small lumps called granulomas.Approximately 25 percent of people with CVID have an autoimmune disorder, which occurs when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's tissues and organs. The blood cells are most frequently affected by autoimmune attacks in CVID; the most commonly occurring autoimmune disorders are immune thrombocytopenia purpura, which is an abnormal bleeding disorder caused by a decrease in platelets, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which results in premature destruction of red blood cells. Other autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis can occur. Individuals with CVID also have a greater than normal risk of developing certain types of cancer, including a cancer of immune system cells called non-Hodgkin lymphoma and less frequently, stomach (gastric) cancer.People with CVID may start experiencing signs and symptoms of the disorder anytime between childhood and adulthood; most people with CVID are diagnosed in their twenties or thirties. The life expectancy of individuals with CVID varies depending on the severity and frequency of illnesses they experience. Most people with CVID live into adulthood.There are many different types of CVID that are distinguished by genetic cause. People with the same type of CVID may have varying signs and symptoms.
ALZHEIMER DISEASE, PROTECTION AGAINST
MedGen UID:
762362
Concept ID:
C3549448
Disease or Syndrome
susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus
MedGen UID:
854264
Concept ID:
C3862275
Disease or Syndrome
TNF receptor binding, altered
MedGen UID:
864852
Concept ID:
C4016415
Finding
SEPTIC SHOCK, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO
MedGen UID:
864853
Concept ID:
C4016416
Finding
VASCULAR DEMENTIA, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO
MedGen UID:
864854
Concept ID:
C4016417
Finding

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Mu G, Mu X, Xing H, Xu R, Sun G, Dong C, Pan Q, Xu C
Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol 2015 Apr;39(2):261-6. Epub 2014 Sep 18 doi: 10.1016/j.clinre.2014.08.002. PMID: 25242140
Park HW, Han S, Lee JY, Chang HS, Choe J, Choi Y, So H, Yang DH, Myung SJ, Yang SK, Kim JH, Byeon JS
Dig Dis Sci 2015 Jan;60(1):226-33. Epub 2014 Aug 24 doi: 10.1007/s10620-014-3334-9. PMID: 25150704
Guo Y, Li HY
J Cancer Res Ther 2014 Dec;10 Suppl:263-6. doi: 10.4103/0973-1482.151482. PMID: 25693932
Ustun B, Chhieng D, Van Dyke A, Carling T, Holt E, Udelsman R, Adeniran AJ
Cancer Cytopathol 2014 Jul;122(7):536-45. Epub 2014 Apr 18 doi: 10.1002/cncy.21425. PMID: 24753500
Park SK, Kim JW, Park SH, Yang DH, Jung KW, Kim KJ, Ye BD, Myung SJ, Yang SK, Kim JH, Byeon JS
Surg Endosc 2014 May;28(5):1634-40. Epub 2014 Jan 8 doi: 10.1007/s00464-013-3363-z. PMID: 24399522

Diagnosis

Muraki T, Uehara T, Sano K, Oota H, Yoshizawa A, Asaka S, Tateishi A, Otsuki T, Shingu K, Matoba H, Kobayashi S, Ichimata S, Watanabe T, Itou T, Tanaka E
Pathol Res Pract 2015 Dec;211(12):1034-9. Epub 2015 Oct 30 doi: 10.1016/j.prp.2015.10.009. PMID: 26586167
Halder S, Dey RK, Chowdhury AR, Bhattacharyya P, Chakrabarti A
J Proteomics 2015 Sep 8;127(Pt A):185-92. Epub 2015 May 2 doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2015.04.022. PMID: 25943868
Maxwell JP, Wang C, Wiebe N, Yilmaz A, Trpkov K
Diagn Pathol 2015 Mar 13;10:3. doi: 10.1186/s13000-015-0234-z. PMID: 25886613Free PMC Article
Park SK, Kim JW, Park SH, Yang DH, Jung KW, Kim KJ, Ye BD, Myung SJ, Yang SK, Kim JH, Byeon JS
Surg Endosc 2014 May;28(5):1634-40. Epub 2014 Jan 8 doi: 10.1007/s00464-013-3363-z. PMID: 24399522
Naito Y, Kusano H, Nakashima O, Sadashima E, Hattori S, Taira T, Kawahara A, Okabe Y, Shimamatsu K, Taguchi J, Momosaki S, Irie K, Yamaguchi R, Yokomizo H, Nagamine M, Fukuda S, Sugiyama S, Nishida N, Higaki K, Yoshitomi M, Yasunaga M, Okuda K, Kinoshita H, Nakayama M, Yasumoto M, Akiba J, Kage M, Yano H
World J Gastroenterol 2012 Jul 28;18(28):3673-80. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v18.i28.3673. PMID: 22851859Free PMC Article

Therapy

Angelot-Delettre F, Roggy A, Frankel AE, Lamarthee B, Seilles E, Biichle S, Royer B, Deconinck E, Rowinsky EK, Brooks C, Bardet V, Benet B, Bennani H, Benseddik Z, Debliquis A, Lusina D, Roussel M, Solly F, Ticchioni M, Saas P, Garnache-Ottou F
Haematologica 2015 Feb;100(2):223-30. Epub 2014 Nov 7 doi: 10.3324/haematol.2014.111740. PMID: 25381130Free PMC Article
Mu G, Mu X, Xing H, Xu R, Sun G, Dong C, Pan Q, Xu C
Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol 2015 Apr;39(2):261-6. Epub 2014 Sep 18 doi: 10.1016/j.clinre.2014.08.002. PMID: 25242140
Guo Y, Li HY
J Cancer Res Ther 2014 Dec;10 Suppl:263-6. doi: 10.4103/0973-1482.151482. PMID: 25693932
Kim DH, Gong EJ, Jung HY, Lim H, Ahn JY, Choi KS, Lee JH, Choi KD, Song HJ, Lee GH, Kim JH, Roh JL, Choi SH, Nam SY, Kim SY, Baek S
Scand J Gastroenterol 2014 Dec;49(12):1486-92. Epub 2014 Nov 5 doi: 10.3109/00365521.2013.832369. PMID: 25372595
Park SK, Kim JW, Park SH, Yang DH, Jung KW, Kim KJ, Ye BD, Myung SJ, Yang SK, Kim JH, Byeon JS
Surg Endosc 2014 May;28(5):1634-40. Epub 2014 Jan 8 doi: 10.1007/s00464-013-3363-z. PMID: 24399522

Prognosis

Halder S, Dey RK, Chowdhury AR, Bhattacharyya P, Chakrabarti A
J Proteomics 2015 Sep 8;127(Pt A):185-92. Epub 2015 May 2 doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2015.04.022. PMID: 25943868
Sheng R, Xie Y, Zeng M, Ji Y, Rao S, Chen C
Radiol Med 2015 Nov;120(11):1012-20. Epub 2015 Apr 24 doi: 10.1007/s11547-015-0544-y. PMID: 25907993
Nielsen C, Bojesen SE, Nordestgaard BG, Kofoed KF, Birgens HS
Haematologica 2014 Sep;99(9):1448-55. Epub 2014 Jun 6 doi: 10.3324/haematol.2014.107631. PMID: 24907356Free PMC Article
Ustun B, Chhieng D, Van Dyke A, Carling T, Holt E, Udelsman R, Adeniran AJ
Cancer Cytopathol 2014 Jul;122(7):536-45. Epub 2014 Apr 18 doi: 10.1002/cncy.21425. PMID: 24753500
Park SK, Kim JW, Park SH, Yang DH, Jung KW, Kim KJ, Ye BD, Myung SJ, Yang SK, Kim JH, Byeon JS
Surg Endosc 2014 May;28(5):1634-40. Epub 2014 Jan 8 doi: 10.1007/s00464-013-3363-z. PMID: 24399522

Clinical prediction guides

Halder S, Dey RK, Chowdhury AR, Bhattacharyya P, Chakrabarti A
J Proteomics 2015 Sep 8;127(Pt A):185-92. Epub 2015 May 2 doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2015.04.022. PMID: 25943868
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