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1.

Tuberous sclerosis syndrome

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) involves abnormalities of the skin (hypomelanotic macules, facial angiofibromas, shagreen patches, cephalic plaques, ungual fibromas); brain (cortical dysplasias, subependymal nodules and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas [SEGAs], seizures, intellectual disability/developmental delay, psychiatric illness); kidney (angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas); heart (rhabdomyomas, arrhythmias); and lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]). CNS tumors are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality; renal disease is the second leading cause of early death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
22518
Concept ID:
C0041341
Neoplastic Process
2.

Renal cyst

A fluid filled sac in the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7215
Concept ID:
C0022679
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Carcinoma

A malignant tumor arising from epithelial cells. Carcinomas that arise from glandular epithelium are called adenocarcinomas, those that arise from squamous epithelium are called squamous cell carcinomas, and those that arise from transitional epithelium are called transitional cell carcinomas (NCI Thesaurus). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
4.

Carcinoma

MedGen UID:
910818
Concept ID:
CN241453
Finding
5.

Abnormality of the lung

Any structural anomaly of the lung. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
892303
Concept ID:
C4021760
Anatomical Abnormality
6.

Renal cell carcinoma

MedGen UID:
775811
Concept ID:
CN182935
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Renal cell carcinoma

A type of carcinoma of the kidney with origin in the epithelium of the proximal convoluted renal tubule. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505836
Concept ID:
CN004944
Finding
8.

Cystic lung disease

MedGen UID:
446735
Concept ID:
CN005241
Finding
9.

Tuberous sclerosis 2

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterized by hamartomas in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These changes can result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, behavioral problems, and renal failure, among other complications (reviews by Crino et al., 2006 and Curatolo et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of tuberous sclerosis, see tuberous sclerosis-1 (191100), caused by mutation in the TSC1 gene (605284) on chromosome 9q34. Approximately 10 to 30% of cases of tuberous sclerosis are due to mutations in the TSC1 gene: the frequency of cases due to mutations in the TSC2 gene is consistently higher. TSC2 mutations are associated with more severe disease (Crino et al., 2006) (see GENOTYPE/PHENOTYPE CORRELATIONS section). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
348170
Concept ID:
C1860707
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Tuberous sclerosis 1

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) involves abnormalities of the skin (hypomelanotic macules, facial angiofibromas, shagreen patches, cephalic plaques, ungual fibromas); brain (cortical dysplasias, subependymal nodules and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas [SEGAs], seizures, intellectual disability/developmental delay, psychiatric illness); kidney (angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas); heart (rhabdomyomas, arrhythmias); and lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]). CNS tumors are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality; renal disease is the second leading cause of early death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
344288
Concept ID:
C1854465
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hip dysplasia, beukes type

Beukes hip dysplasia is characterized by severe progressive degenerative osteoarthritis of the hip joint in early adulthood, with underlying dysplasia confined to that region. Affected individuals are of normal stature and have no associated health problems. Symptoms of hip joint discomfort usually develop in infancy or later childhood, but may present as late as the fourth decade. Phenotypic expression is age-related and variable in severity; penetrance is incomplete and has been estimated to be 80%. The earliest primary radiographic features of BHD include bilateral shortening and broadening of the femoral neck, delayed appearance of the secondary ossification center, coxa vara, displacement of the femoral head in the acetabulum, and overgrowth of the greater trochanters. After onset of symptoms, the characteristic signs of osteoarthritis develop, including bone sclerosis, cyst formation, and narrowing of the joint space, with rapid deterioration of the joint (summary by Watson et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333593
Concept ID:
C1840572
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Cystic disease of lung

MedGen UID:
278028
Concept ID:
C1384901
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Multiple fibrofolliculomas

The clinical characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) include cutaneous manifestations (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas/angiofibromas, perifollicular fibromas, and acrochordons), pulmonary cysts/history of pneumothorax, and various types of renal tumors. Disease severity can vary significantly even within the same family. Skin lesions typically appear during the third and fourth decades of life and typically increase in size and number with age. Lung cysts are mostly bilateral and multifocal; most individuals are asymptomatic but at high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax. Individuals with BHDS are at a sevenfold increased risk for renal tumors that are typically bilateral and multifocal and usually slow growing; median age of tumor diagnosis is 48 years. The most common renal tumors are a hybrid of oncocytoma and chromophobe histologic cell types (so-called oncocytic hybrid tumor) and chromophobe histologic cell types. Some families have renal tumor and/or autosomal dominant spontaneous pneumothorax without cutaneous manifestations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
91070
Concept ID:
C0346010
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Neoplasm of the skin

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. . Anyone can get skin cancer, but it is more common in people who . - Spend a lot of time in the sun or have been sunburned. - Have light-colored skin, hair and eyes. - Have a family member with skin cancer. - Are over age 50. You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and biologic therapy. PDT uses a drug and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
40101
Concept ID:
C0007114
Neoplastic Process
15.

Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, 1

Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma is characterized by the development of multiple, bilateral papillary renal tumors (Zbar et al., 1995). The transmission pattern is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is histologically and genetically distinct from 2 other forms of inherited renal carcinoma, von Hippel Lindau disease (193300), caused by mutation in the VHL gene (608537) on chromosome 3, and a form associated with the chromosome translocation t(3;8), as described by Cohen et al. (1979). Bodmer et al. (2002) reviewed the molecular genetics of familial and nonfamilial cases of renal cell carcinoma, including the roles of VHL, MET, and translocations involving chromosomes 1, 3, and X. For background information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nonpapillary renal cell carcinoma, see RCC (144700). See also a hereditary syndrome of predisposition to uterine leiomyomas and papillary renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC; 150800) caused by germline mutation in the FH gene (136850). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766
Concept ID:
C0007134
Neoplastic Process
16.

Neuroepithelial neoplasm

Neoplasms composed of neuroepithelial cells, which have the capacity to differentiate into NEURONS, oligodendrocytes, and ASTROCYTES. The majority of craniospinal tumors are of neuroepithelial origin. (From Dev Biol 1998 Aug 1;200(1):1-5) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
60215
Concept ID:
C0206715
Neoplastic Process
17.

Neuroectodermal neoplasm

A neoplasm arising in the neuroectoderm, the portion of the ectoderm of the early embryo that gives rise to the central and peripheral nervous systems, including some glial cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
60072
Concept ID:
C0206093
Neoplastic Process
18.

Urinary tract neoplasm

A benign or malignant, primary or metastatic neoplasm involving the urinary system. --2003 [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
52949
Concept ID:
C0042076
Neoplastic Process
19.

Embryonal neoplasm

new abnormal embryonic tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
45034
Concept ID:
C0027654
Neoplastic Process
20.

Glioblastoma

a type of brain tumor [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
42228
Concept ID:
C0017636
Neoplastic Process
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