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Items: 4

1.

Hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. . Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the liver. Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have. -Loss of appetite. -Nausea and vomiting. -Diarrhea. -Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements. -Stomach pain. -Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes. Some forms of hepatitis are mild, and others can be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5515
Concept ID:
C0019158
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Choroid plexus carcinoma

Intraventricular papillary neoplasm derived from choroid plexus epithelium. Plexus tumors are most common in the lateral and fourth ventricles; while 80% of lateral ventricle tumors present in children, fourth ventricle tumors are evenly distributed in all age groups. Clinically, choroid plexus tumors tend to cause hydrocephalus and increased intracranial pressure. Histologically, choroid plexus papillomas correspond to WHO grade I, choroid plexus carcinomas to WHO grade III. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
96557
Concept ID:
C0431109
Neoplastic Process
3.

Papillary thyroid carcinoma

Nonmedullary thyroid cancer (NMTC) comprises thyroid cancers of follicular cell origin and accounts for more than 95% of all thyroid cancer cases. The remaining cancers originate from parafollicular cells (medullary thyroid cancer, MTC; 155240). NMTC is classified into 4 groups: papillary, follicular (188470), Hurthle cell (607464), and anaplastic. Approximately 5% of NMTC is hereditary, occurring as a component of a familial cancer syndrome (e.g., familial adenomatous polyposis, 175100; Carney complex, 160980) or as a primary feature (familial NMTC or FNMTC). Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the most common histologic subtype of FNMTC, accounting for approximately 85% of cases (summary by Vriens et al., 2009). PTC is characterized by distinctive nuclear alterations including pseudoinclusions, grooves, and chromatin clearing. PTCs smaller than 1 cm are referred to as papillary microcarcinomas. These tumors have been identified in up to 35% of individuals at autopsy, suggesting that they may be extremely common although rarely clinically relevant. PTC can also be multifocal but is typically slow-growing with a tendency to spread to lymph nodes and usually has an excellent prognosis (summary by Bonora et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer NMTC2 (188470) is caused by mutation in the SRGAP1 gene (606523). NMTC3 (606240) represents a susceptibility locus mapped to chromosome 2q21. NMTC4 (616534) is caused by mutation in the FOXE1 gene (602617). NMTC5 (616535) is caused by mutation in the HABP2 gene (603924). A susceptibility gene for familial nonmedullary thyroid carcinoma with or without cell oxyphilia (TCO; 603386) has been mapped to chromosome 19p. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
66773
Concept ID:
C0238463
Neoplastic Process
4.

Hiv

An infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5583
Concept ID:
C0019693
Disease or Syndrome
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