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Items: 14

1.

Congenital mesoblastic nephroma

Congenital mesoblastic nephroma is a type of kidney tumor that is usually found before birth by ultrasound or within the first 3 months of life. It contains fibroblastic cells (connective tissue cells), and may spread to the other kidney or to nearby tissue. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
232058
Concept ID:
C1332965
Neoplastic Process
2.

Wilms tumor 1

Aniridia is characterized by complete or partial iris hypoplasia usually (but not always) with associated foveal hypoplasia resulting in reduced visual acuity and nystagmus presenting in early infancy. Frequently associated ocular abnormalities (often of later onset) include cataract, glaucoma, and corneal opacification and vascularization. Aniridia may occur either as an isolated ocular abnormality without systemic involvement, caused by mutation of PAX6 or deletion of a regulatory region controlling its expression, or as part of the Wilms tumor-aniridia-genital anomalies-retardation (WAGR) syndrome, with a deletion of 11p13 involving the PAX6 (aniridia) locus and the adjacent WT1 (Wilms tumor) locus. Individuals with deletion of PAX6 and WT1 are at up to a 50% risk of developing Wilms tumor. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
447509
Concept ID:
CN033288
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hemihypertrophy

MedGen UID:
372094
Concept ID:
C1835632
Finding
4.

Hemihypertrophy

Overgrowth of only one side of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
90701
Concept ID:
C0332890
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Nephroblastoma

Wilms tumor is a rare type of kidney cancer. It causes a tumor on one or both kidneys. It usually affects children, but can happen in adults. Having certain genetic conditions or birth defects can increase the risk of getting it. Children that are at risk should be screened for Wilms tumor every three months until they turn eight. Symptoms include a lump in the abdomen, blood in the urine, and a fever for no reason. Tests that examine the kidney and blood are used to find the tumor. Doctors usually diagnose and remove the tumor in surgery. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation and biologic therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10221
Concept ID:
C0027708
Neoplastic Process
7.

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a growth disorder variably characterized by neonatal hypoglycemia, macrosomia, macroglossia, hemihyperplasia, omphalocele, embryonal tumors (e.g., Wilms tumor, hepatoblastoma, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma), visceromegaly, adrenocortical cytomegaly, renal abnormalities (e.g., medullary dysplasia, nephrocalcinosis, medullary sponge kidney, and nephromegaly), and ear creases/pits. BWS is considered a clinical spectrum, in which affected individuals may have many of these features or may have only one or two clinical features. Early death may occur from complications of prematurity, hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, macroglossia, or tumors. However, the previously reported mortality of 20% is likely an overestimate given better recognition of the disorder along with enhanced treatment options. Macroglossia and macrosomia are generally present at birth but may have postnatal onset. Growth rate slows around age seven to eight years. Hemihyperplasia may affect segmental regions of the body or selected organs and tissues. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2562
Concept ID:
C0004903
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
8.

Isolated hemihyperplasia

Isolated hemihyperplasia is an abnormality of cell proliferation leading to asymmetric overgrowth of one or more regions of the body. The term 'hemihyperplasia' has replaced the term 'hemihypertrophy' to describe accurately the increase in cell number found in these patients. The incidence of isolated hemihyperplasia is estimated to be 1 in 86,000. Idiopathic hemihypertrophy is associated with increased risk of embryonal cancers in childhood, particularly Wilms tumor (194070) (Shuman et al., 2006). Hoyme et al. (1998) provided an anatomic classification of hemihyperplasia: complex hemihyperplasia is involvement of half of the body, including at least 1 arm and 1 leg; affected parts may be contralateral or ipsilateral. Simple hemihyperplasia is involvement of a single limb. See also facial hemihyperplasia (133900). Although isolated hemihyperplasia is a distinct clinical entity, it can also occur as a feature of overgrowth syndromes, including Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS; 130650), neurofibromatosis (NF1; 162200), Proteus syndrome (176920), and Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (149000) (Shuman et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
383853
Concept ID:
C1856184
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Urinary tract neoplasm

A benign or malignant, primary or metastatic neoplasm involving the urinary system. --2003 [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
52949
Concept ID:
C0042076
Neoplastic Process
10.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
11.

Nephropathy

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. . Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Renal neoplasm

The presence of a neoplasm of the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
5967
Concept ID:
C0022665
Neoplastic Process
13.

Hypertrophy of the lower limb

Abnormal increase in size of the lower limbs (due to an increase of the size of cells). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
869376
Concept ID:
C4023803
Anatomical Abnormality
14.

Hemihypertrophy of lower limb

Overgrowth of only one leg. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451056
Concept ID:
C0431928
Congenital Abnormality
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