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Items: 7

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include. -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the prostate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
3.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
4.

Neoplasm of stomach

In a review article on the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer, Bevan and Houlston (1999) concluded that several genes may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is a manifestation of a number of inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, including hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC1; see 120435), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS; 175200), Cowden disease (CD; 158350), and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (151623). See also hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC; 137215). Canedo et al. (2007) provided a review of genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (see 600263). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20958
Concept ID:
C0038356
Neoplastic Process
5.

Prostatic Neoplasms

A benign, borderline, or malignant neoplasm that affects the prostate gland. Representative examples include benign prostate phyllodes tumor, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, prostate carcinoma, and prostate sarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18697
Concept ID:
C0033578
Neoplastic Process
6.

Head and Neck Neoplasms

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the head and neck region with origin in the lip, oral cavity, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, pharynx, or larynx. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
6728
Concept ID:
C0018671
Neoplastic Process
7.

Esophageal Neoplasms

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the esophagus. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
4547
Concept ID:
C0014859
Neoplastic Process
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