Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 31

1.

Epithelial Neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm that arises from and is composed of epithelial cells. This category include adenomas, papillomas, and carcinomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
2.

ovarian cancer

MedGen UID:
880186
Concept ID:
CN235601
Finding
3.

Ovarian cancer

MedGen UID:
799680
Concept ID:
CN201033
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is a disease that affects women. In this form of cancer, certain cells in the ovary become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. The ovaries are the female reproductive organs in which egg cells are produced. In about 90 percent of cases, ovarian cancer occurs after age 40, and most cases occur after age 60.The most common form of ovarian cancer begins in epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the surfaces and cavities of the body. These cancers can arise in the epithelial cells on the surface of the ovary. However, researchers suggest that many or even most ovarian cancers begin in epithelial cells on the fringes (fimbriae) at the end of one of the fallopian tubes, and the cancerous cells migrate to the ovary.Cancer can also begin in epithelial cells that form the lining of the abdomen (the peritoneum). This form of cancer, called primary peritoneal cancer, resembles epithelial ovarian cancer in its origin, symptoms, progression, and treatment. Primary peritoneal cancer often spreads to the ovaries. It can also occur even if the ovaries have been removed. Because cancers that begin in the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and peritoneum are so similar and spread easily from one of these structures to the others, they are often difficult to distinguish. These cancers are so closely related that they are generally considered collectively by experts.In about 10 percent of cases, ovarian cancer develops not in epithelial cells but in germ cells, which are precursors to egg cells, or in hormone-producing ovarian cells called granulosa cells.In its early stages, ovarian cancer usually does not cause noticeable symptoms. As the cancer progresses, signs and symptoms can include pain or a feeling of heaviness in the pelvis or lower abdomen, bloating, feeling full quickly when eating, back pain, vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods or after menopause, or changes in urinary or bowel habits. However, these changes can occur as part of many different conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean that a woman has ovarian cancer.In some cases, cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. If ovarian cancer spreads, cancerous tumors most often appear in the abdominal cavity or on the surfaces of nearby organs such as the bladder or colon. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers.Some ovarian cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary and are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary ovarian cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.Because it is often diagnosed at a late stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to treat; it leads to the deaths of about 14,000 women annually in the United States, more than any other gynecological cancer. However, when it is diagnosed and treated early, the 5-year survival rate is high. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
216027
Concept ID:
C1140680
Neoplastic Process
5.

Neoplasm of ovary

Ovarian cancer, the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, is characterized by advanced presentation with loco-regional dissemination in the peritoneal cavity and the rare incidence of visceral metastases (Chi et al., 2001). These typical features relate to the biology of the disease, which is a principal determinant of outcome (Auersperg et al., 2001). Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most common form and encompasses 5 major histologic subtypes: papillary serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and transitional cell. Epithelial ovarian cancer arises as a result of genetic alterations sustained by the ovarian surface epithelium (Stany et al., 2008; Soslow, 2008). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
181539
Concept ID:
C0919267
Neoplastic Process
6.

Infection

The invasion of an organism's body tissues by disease-causing agents and their multiplication, as well as the reaction by the host to these organisms and/or toxins that the organisms produce. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
7.

Carcinoma

A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
8.

Ovarian carcinoma

MedGen UID:
910836
Concept ID:
CN241339
Finding
9.

Carcinoma

MedGen UID:
910818
Concept ID:
CN241453
Finding
10.

Epithelioma, malignant

MedGen UID:
639977
Concept ID:
C0553707
Neoplastic Process
11.

Staining

MedGen UID:
352872
Concept ID:
C1704680
Finding
12.

Ovarian epithelial cancer

A malignant neoplasm originating from the surface ovarian epithelium. It accounts for the greatest number of deaths from malignancies of the female genital tract and is the fifth leading cause of cancer fatalities in women. It is predominantly a disease of older white women of northern European extraction, but it is seen in all ages and ethnic groups. Adenocarcinomas constitute the vast majority of ovarian carcinomas. The pattern of metastatic spread in ovarian carcinoma is similar regardless of the microscopic type. The most common sites of involvement are the contralateral ovary, peritoneal cavity, para-aortic and pelvic lymph nodes, and liver. Lung and pleura are the most common sites of extra-abdominal spread. The primary form of therapy is surgical. The overall prognosis of ovarian carcinoma remains poor, a direct result of its rapid growth rate and the lack of early symptoms. --2002 [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
151807
Concept ID:
C0677886
Neoplastic Process
13.

Borderline

Having a minor degree of severity that is considered to be on the boundary between the normal and the abnormal ranges. For quantitative traits, a deviation of that is less than two standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
59969
Concept ID:
C0205189
Qualitative Concept
14.

Female Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318599
Concept ID:
C1720887
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT, the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE), and disorders related to PREGNANCY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318565
Concept ID:
C1720765
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Abnormality of the ovary

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder that affects the ovary. Representative examples of non-neoplastic disorders include endometriosis and polycystic ovarian disease. Representative examples of neoplastic disorders include ovarian surface epithelial-stromal tumors, germ cell tumors, and sex cord-stromal tumors. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45256
Concept ID:
C0029928
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
18.

UPREG

A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
12003
Concept ID:
C0041904
Molecular Function
19.

Gonadal Disorder

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder that affects the testis or the ovary. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
9074
Concept ID:
C0018050
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Female Reproductive System Neoplasm

A benign, precancerous, or malignant neoplasm that affects the female reproductive system. Representative examples include uterine corpus leiomyoma, endocervical polyp, ovarian carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, and endometrial carcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
9004
Concept ID:
C0017416
Neoplastic Process
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center