Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 47

1.

Familial adenomatous polyposis

MedGen UID:
910615
Concept ID:
CN240755
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Familial adenomatous polyposis 1

APC-associated polyposis conditions include: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated FAP, and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). FAP is a colon cancer predisposition syndrome in which hundreds to thousands of adenomatous colonic polyps develop, beginning, on average, at age 16 years (range 7-36 years). By age 35 years, 95% of individuals with FAP have polyps; without colectomy, colon cancer is inevitable. The mean age of colon cancer diagnosis in untreated individuals is 39 years (range 34-43 years). Extracolonic manifestations are variably present and include: polyps of the gastric fundus and duodenum, osteomas, dental anomalies, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), soft tissue tumors, desmoid tumors, and associated cancers. Attenuated FAP is characterized by multiple colonic polyps (average of 30), more proximally located polyps, and a diagnosis of colon cancer at a later age than in FAP. Certain extracolonic manifestations, such as gastric and duodenal polyps or cancers, are variably present in attenuated FAP; risk management may be substantially different between FAP and attenuated FAP. GAPPS is characterized by gastric fundic gland polyposis, increased risk of gastric cancer, and limited colonic involvement in most individuals reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
398651
Concept ID:
C2713442
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Polyposis

The development of numerous polyps (growths that protrude from a mucous membrane). [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
137722
Concept ID:
C0334108
Neoplastic Process
4.

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

Low platelet count following administration of unfractionated or (less commonly) low-molecular weight heparin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
124423
Concept ID:
C0272285
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Familial multiple polyposis syndrome

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of familial adenomatous polyposis may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic familial adenomatous polyposis is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis is 55 years.In people with classic familial adenomatous polyposis, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic familial adenomatous polyposis and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome.A milder type of familial adenomatous polyposis, called autosomal recessive familial adenomatous polyposis, has also been identified. People with the autosomal recessive type of this disorder have fewer polyps than those with the classic type. Fewer than 100 polyps typically develop, rather than hundreds or thousands. The autosomal recessive type of this disorder is caused by mutations in a different gene than the classic and attenuated types of familial adenomatous polyposis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
46010
Concept ID:
C0032580
Neoplastic Process
6.

Colorectal Cancer

The colon and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of the large intestine. It is common in both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more likely to get it if you have colorectal polyps, a family history of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, eat a diet high in fat, or smoke. Symptoms of colorectal cancer include. -Diarrhea or constipation. -A feeling that your bowel does not empty completely. -Blood (either bright red or very dark) in your stool. -Stools that are narrower than usual. -Frequent gas pains or cramps, or feeling full or bloated. -Weight loss with no known reason. -Fatigue. -Nausea or vomiting. Because you may not have symptoms at first, it's important to have screening tests. Everyone over 50 should get screened. Tests include colonoscopy and tests for blood in the stool. Treatments for colorectal cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination. Surgery can usually cure it when it is found early. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
287122
Concept ID:
C1527249
Neoplastic Process
7.

Oxidative Stress

A condition in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal. Antioxidant levels are usually measured in blood plasma. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
66929
Concept ID:
C0242606
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
8.

Colorectal cancer.

MedGen UID:
910619
Concept ID:
CN240758
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Colorectal cancer

MedGen UID:
808161
Concept ID:
CN221574
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Familial colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is common in both men and women. In addition to lifestyle and environmental risk factors, gene defects can contribute to an inherited predisposition to CRC. CRC is caused by changes in different molecular pathogenic pathways, such as chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Chromosome instability is the most common alteration and is present in almost 85% of all cases (review by Schweiger et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Colorectal Cancer Mutations in a single gene result in a marked predisposition to colorectal cancer in 2 distinct syndromes: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; see 120435). FAP is caused by mutations in the APC gene (611731), whereas HNPCC is caused by mutations in several genes, including MSH2 (609309), MLH1 (120436), PMS1 (600258), PMS2 (600259), MSH6 (600678), TGFBR2 (190182), and MLH3 (604395). Epigenetic silencing of MSH2 results in a form of HNPCC (see HNPCC8, 613244). Other colorectal cancer syndromes include autosomal recessive adenomatous polyposis (608456), which is caused by mutations in the MUTYH gene (604933), and oligodontia-colorectal cancer syndrome (608615), which is caused by mutations in the AXIN2 gene (604025). The CHEK2 gene (604373) has been implicated in susceptibility to colorectal cancer in Finnish patients. A germline mutation in the PLA2G2A gene (172411) was identified in a patient with colorectal cancer. Germline susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer have also been identified. CRCS1 (608812) is conferred by mutation in the GALNT12 gene (610290) on chromosome 9q22; CRCS2 (611469) maps to chromosome 8q24; CRCS3 (612229) is conferred by variation in the SMAD7 gene (602932) on chromosome 18; CRCS4 (601228) is conferred by variation on 15q that causes increased and ectopic expression of the GREM1 gene (603054); CRCS5 (612230) maps to chromosome 10p14; CRCS6 (612231) maps to chromosome 8q23; CRCS7 (612232) maps to chromosome 11q23; CRCS8 (612589) maps to chromosome 14q22; CRCS9 (612590) maps to 16q22; CRCS10 (612591) is conferred by mutation in the POLD1 gene (174761) on chromosome 19q13; CRCS11 (612592) maps to chromosome 20p12; and CRCS12 (615083) is conferred by mutation in the POLE gene (174762) on chromosome 12q24. Somatic mutations in many different genes, including KRAS (190070), PIK3CA (171834), BRAF (164757), CTNNB1 (116806), FGFR3 (134934), AXIN2 (604025), AKT1 (164730), MCC (159350), MYH11 (160745), PARK2 (602544), and RNF43 (612482), have been identified in colorectal cancer. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
430218
Concept ID:
CN029768
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Amyloidogenic transthyretin amyloidosis

Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is characterized by a slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy as well as non-neuropathic changes of cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities, and CNS amyloidosis. The disease usually begins in the third to fifth decade in persons from endemic foci in Portugal and Japan; onset is later in persons from other areas. Typically, sensory neuropathy starts in the lower extremities with paresthesias and hypesthesias of the feet, followed within a few years by motor neuropathy. In some persons, particularly those with early onset disease, autonomic neuropathy is the first manifestation of the condition; findings can include: orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, attacks of nausea and vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, sexual impotence, anhidrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Cardiac amyloidosis is mainly characterized by progressive cardiomyopathy. Individuals with leptomeningeal amyloidosis may have the following CNS findings: dementia, psychosis, visual impairment, headache, seizures, motor paresis, ataxia, myelopathy, hydrocephalus, or intracranial hemorrhage. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
414031
Concept ID:
C2751492
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Therapeutic agent

1D1; Basic Sciences Research (includes vaccine and chemotherapy development); Therapeutic Agents (antiviral, antimicrobial, immunomodulating and antineoplastic agents); Development. Physical or chemical agents that may improve the health of a patient by impeding cancer or other diseases [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
299559
Concept ID:
C1611640
Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Carcinoma of colon

Cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon (the longest part of the large intestine). Most colon cancers are adenocarcinomas (cancers that begin in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
147065
Concept ID:
C0699790
Neoplastic Process
14.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
15.

Mass of body structure

In medicine, a lump in the body. It may be caused by the abnormal growth of cells, a cyst, hormonal changes, or an immune reaction. A mass may be benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
108287
Concept ID:
C0577559
Finding
16.

Stress

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Not all stress is bad. All animals have a stress response, and it can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress:. -Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities. -Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness. -Traumatic stress, which happens when you are in danger of being seriously hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, and irritability. People under chronic stress get more frequent and severe viral infections, such as the flu or common cold. Vaccines, such as the flu shot, are less effective for them. Some people cope with stress more effectively than others. It's important to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20971
Concept ID:
C0038435
Finding
17.

Adhesion

Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby organs, or to the wall of the abdomen. They can pull sections of the intestines out of place. This may block food from passing through the intestine. Adhesions can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the abdomen. Almost everyone who has surgery on the abdomen gets adhesions. Some adhesions don't cause any problems. But when they partly or completely block the intestines, they cause symptoms such as. -Severe abdominal pain or cramping. -Vomiting. -Bloating. -An inability to pass gas. -Constipation. Adhesions can sometimes cause infertility in women by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus. No tests are available to detect adhesions. Doctors usually find them during surgery to diagnose other problems. Some adhesions go away by themselves. If they partly block your intestines, a diet low in fiber can allow food to move easily through the affected area. If you have a complete intestinal obstruction, it is life threatening. You should get immediate medical attention and may need surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7891
Concept ID:
C0001511
Acquired Abnormality; Pathologic Function
18.

Colorectal Carcinoma

Cancer that develops in the colon (the longest part of the large intestine) and/or the rectum (the last several inches of the large intestine before the anus). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3170
Concept ID:
C0009402
Neoplastic Process
19.

Colon cancer

A primary or metastatic malignant neoplasm that affects the colon. Representative examples include carcinoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2839
Concept ID:
C0007102
Neoplastic Process
20.

Epithelial Neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm that arises from and is composed of epithelial cells. This category include adenomas, papillomas, and carcinomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center