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Items: 19

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include. -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the prostate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
3.

Sporadic

Cases of the disease in question occur without a previous family history, i.e., as isolated cases without being transmitted from a parent and without other siblings being affected. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
342827
Concept ID:
C1853237
Finding
4.

Defensins

Family of antimicrobial peptides that have been identified in humans, animals, and plants. They are thought to play a role in host defenses against infections, inflammation, wound repair, and acquired immunity. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
27970
Concept ID:
C0057256
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
5.

genetic linkage

The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6102
Concept ID:
C0023745
Molecular Function
6.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
7.

Familial prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually in middle age or later. In this disorder, certain cells in the prostate become abnormal and multiply without control or order to form a tumor. The prostate is a gland that surrounds the male urethra and helps produce semen, the fluid that carries sperm.Early prostate cancer usually does not cause pain, and most affected men exhibit no noticeable symptoms. Men are often diagnosed as the result of health screenings, such as a blood test for a substance called prostate specific antigen (PSA) or a medical procedure called a digital rectal exam. As the tumor grows larger, signs and symptoms can include difficulty starting or stopping the flow of urine, a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely, blood in the urine or semen, or pain with ejaculation. However, these changes can also occur with many other genitourinary conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not necessarily mean that a man has prostate cancer.The severity and outcome of prostate cancer varies widely. Early-stage prostate cancer can usually be treated successfully, and some older men have prostate tumors that grow so slowly that they may never cause health problems during their lifetime, even without treatment. In other men, however, the cancer is much more aggressive; in these cases, prostate cancer can be life-threatening.Some cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers. The signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer depend on where the disease has spread. If prostate cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the lymph nodes, bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Bone metastases of prostate cancer most often cause pain in the lower back, pelvis, or hips.A small percentage of all prostate cancers cluster in families. These hereditary cancers are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary prostate cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
506732
Concept ID:
CN036094
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Prostate cancer, hereditary, 1

Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually in middle age or later. In this disorder, certain cells in the prostate become abnormal and multiply without control or order to form a tumor. The prostate is a gland that surrounds the male urethra and helps produce semen, the fluid that carries sperm.Early prostate cancer usually does not cause pain, and most affected men exhibit no noticeable symptoms. Men are often diagnosed as the result of health screenings, such as a blood test for a substance called prostate specific antigen (PSA) or a medical procedure called a digital rectal exam. As the tumor grows larger, signs and symptoms can include difficulty starting or stopping the flow of urine, a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely, blood in the urine or semen, or pain with ejaculation. However, these changes can also occur with many other genitourinary conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not necessarily mean that a man has prostate cancer.The severity and outcome of prostate cancer varies widely. Early-stage prostate cancer can usually be treated successfully, and some older men have prostate tumors that grow so slowly that they may never cause health problems during their lifetime, even without treatment. In other men, however, the cancer is much more aggressive; in these cases, prostate cancer can be life-threatening.Some cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers. The signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer depend on where the disease has spread. If prostate cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the lymph nodes, bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Bone metastases of prostate cancer most often cause pain in the lower back, pelvis, or hips.A small percentage of all prostate cancers cluster in families. These hereditary cancers are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary prostate cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
419810
Concept ID:
C2931456
Neoplastic Process
9.

Localized

Being confined or restricted to a particular location. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
98236
Concept ID:
C0392752
Spatial Concept
10.

Frequent

Coming at short intervals or in great quantities. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87144
Concept ID:
C0332183
Temporal Concept
11.

Onset

The age group in which disease manifestations appear. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
64519
Concept ID:
C0206132
Quantitative Concept
12.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia

An autosomal dominant inherited neoplastic syndrome characterized by the development of various endocrine neoplasms and abnormalities in various anatomic sites. There are three types recognized: type 1 (MEN 1), caused by inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene MEN-1, type 2A (MEN 2A), caused by mutation of the RET gene, and type 2B (MEN 2B) also caused by mutation of the RET gene. Patients with MEN 1 may develop hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid gland adenomas, pituitary gland adenomas, pancreatic islet cell neoplasms, and carcinoid tumors. Patients with MEN 2A develop medullary thyroid carcinomas, and may also develop pheochromocytomas and parathyroid gland hyperplasia. Patients with MEN 2B develop medullary thyroid carcinomas and numerous neural defects including neuromas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45036
Concept ID:
C0027662
Neoplastic Process
13.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Male Reproductive System Neoplasm

Tumor or cancer of the MALE GENITALIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42196
Concept ID:
C0017417
Neoplastic Process
15.

Disorder of male genital organ

Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42195
Concept ID:
C0017412
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
17.

Prostatic Neoplasms

new abnormal prostate tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
18697
Concept ID:
C0033578
Neoplastic Process
18.

Disorder of prostate

The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from the bladder and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It slowly grows larger with age. If it gets too large, it can cause problems. This is very common after age 50. The older men get, the more likely they are to have prostate trouble. Some common problems are. -Prostatitis - inflammation, usually caused by bacteria. -Enlarged prostate (BPH), or benign prostatic hyperplasia - a common problem in older men which may cause dribbling after urination or a need to go often, especially at night. -Prostate cancer - a common cancer that responds best to treatment when detected early. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10964
Concept ID:
C0033575
Disease or Syndrome
19.

DEFB4A protein, human

MedGen UID:
107339
Concept ID:
C0540333
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
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