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Items: 13

1.

Colitis

Colitis refers to an inflammation of the colon and is often used to describe an inflammation of the large intestine (colon, cecum and rectum). Colitides may be acute and self-limited or chronic, and broadly fit into the category of digestive diseases. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
40385
Concept ID:
C0009319
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Thrombosis

The formation or presence of a thrombus (blood clot) inside a blood vessel. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21160
Concept ID:
C0040053
Pathologic Function
3.

Polyuria

An increased rate of urine production. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
19404
Concept ID:
C0032617
Sign or Symptom
4.

Dehydration

When you're dehydrated, your body doesn't have enough fluid to work properly. An average person on an average day needs about 3 quarts of water. But if you're out in the hot sun, you'll need a lot more than that. Most healthy bodies are very good at regulating water. Elderly people, young children and some special cases - like people taking certain medications - need to be a little more careful. Signs of dehydration in adults include. -Being thirsty. -Urinating less often than usual. -Dark-colored urine. -Dry skin. -Feeling tired. -Dizziness and fainting. Signs of dehydration in babies and young children include a dry mouth and tongue, crying without tears, no wet diapers for 3 hours or more, a high fever and being unusually sleepy or drowsy. If you think you're dehydrated, drink small amounts of water over a period of time. Taking too much all at once can overload your stomach and make you throw up. For people exercising in the heat and losing a lot of minerals in sweat, sports drinks can be helpful. Avoid any drinks that have caffeine. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8273
Concept ID:
C0011175
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Lethargy

A state of disinterestedness, listlessness, and indifference, resulting in difficulty performing simple tasks or concentrating. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7310
Concept ID:
C0023380
Sign or Symptom
6.

progressive

MedGen UID:
851455
Concept ID:
CN232553
Finding
7.

Renal insufficiency

A reduction in the level of performance of the kidneys in areas of function comprising the concentration of urine, removal of wastes, the maintenance of electrolyte balance, homeostasis of blood pressure, and calcium metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
332529
Concept ID:
C1565489
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Renal insufficiency

A reduction in the level of performance of the kidneys in areas of function comprising the concentration of urine, removal of wastes, the maintenance of electrolyte balance, homeostasis of blood pressure, and calcium metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
326535
Concept ID:
C1839604
Finding
9.

Chronic kidney disease

Functional anomaly of the kidney persisting for at least three months. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
196667
Concept ID:
C0748318
Finding
10.

Acute kidney injury

A severe stage of acute renal insufficiency, characterized by the sudden decrease in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min, sometime to less than 1 to 2 ml per min. It is usually associated with OLIGURIA; EDEMA; and increase in BLOOD UREA NITROGEN and serum CREATININE concentrations. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9636
Concept ID:
C0022660
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Acute tubular necrosis

Acute kidney failure resulting from destruction of EPITHELIAL CELLS of the KIDNEY TUBULES. It is commonly attributed to exposure to toxic agents or renal ISCHEMIA following severe TRAUMA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7213
Concept ID:
C0022672
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Nephropathy

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. . Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Recurrent E. coli infections

E. coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. . You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of infection include. -Nausea or vomiting. -Severe abdominal cramps. -Watery or very bloody diarrhea. -Fatigue. -Fever. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4543
Concept ID:
C0014836
Disease or Syndrome
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