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Fanconi anemia, complementation group E(FANCE)

MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: FANCE; FANCE-Related Fanconi Anemia
 
Gene (location): FANCE (6p21.31)
OMIM®: 600901

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Fanconi Anemia
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Parinda A Mehta  |  Jakub Tolar   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities, cancer predisposition, and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C (summary by de Winter et al., 2000). For additional general information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fanconi anemia, see 227650.  http://www.omim.org/entry/600901
From GHR
Fanconi anemia is a condition that affects many parts of the body. People with this condition may have bone marrow failure, physical abnormalities, organ defects, and an increased risk of certain cancers.The major function of bone marrow is to produce new blood cells. These include red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body's tissues; white blood cells, which fight infections; and platelets, which are necessary for normal blood clotting. Approximately 90 percent of people with Fanconi anemia have impaired bone marrow function that leads to a decrease in the production of all blood cells (aplastic anemia). Affected individuals experience extreme tiredness (fatigue) due to low numbers of red blood cells (anemia), frequent infections due to low numbers of white blood cells (neutropenia), and clotting problems due to low numbers of platelets (thrombocytopenia). People with Fanconi anemia may also develop myelodysplastic syndrome, a condition in which immature blood cells fail to develop normally.More than half of people with Fanconi anemia have physical abnormalities. These abnormalities can involve irregular skin coloring such as unusually light-colored skin (hypopigmentation) or café-au-lait spots, which are flat patches on the skin that are darker than the surrounding area. Other possible symptoms of Fanconi anemia include malformed thumbs or forearms and other skeletal problems including short stature; malformed or absent kidneys and other defects of the urinary tract; gastrointestinal abnormalities; heart defects; eye abnormalities such as small or abnormally shaped eyes; and malformed ears and hearing loss. People with this condition may have abnormal genitalia or malformations of the reproductive system. As a result, most affected males and about half of affected females cannot have biological children (are infertile). Additional signs and symptoms can include abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system), including increased fluid in the center of the brain (hydrocephalus) or an unusually small head size (microcephaly).Individuals with Fanconi anemia have an increased risk of developing a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow called acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or tumors of the head, neck, skin, gastrointestinal system, or genital tract. The likelihood of developing one of these cancers in people with Fanconi anemia is between 10 and 30 percent.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/fanconi-anemia

Clinical features

Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
184926
Concept ID:
C0948896
Disease or Syndrome
Reduced function of the gonads (testes in males or ovaries in females) associated with excess pituitary gonadotropin secretion and resulting in delayed sexual development and growth delay.
Short thumb
MedGen UID:
98469
Concept ID:
C0431890
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality characterized by hypoplasia or absence of the thumb. It may be associated with other congenital abnormalities.
Absent radius
MedGen UID:
235613
Concept ID:
C1405984
Congenital Abnormality
Missing radius bone associated with congenital failure of development.
Absent thumb
MedGen UID:
480441
Concept ID:
C3278811
Finding
Absent thumb, i.e., the absence of both phalanges of a thumb and the associated soft tissues.
Small for gestational age
MedGen UID:
7064
Concept ID:
C0021288
Patient or Disabled Group
Smaller than normal size according to sex and gestational age related norms, defined as a weight below the 10th percentile for the gestational age.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
Height greater than two standard deviations below the mean of the appropriate reference population for the age and sex of the individual.
Leukemia
MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.
Neutropenia
MedGen UID:
163121
Concept ID:
C0853697
Finding
An abnormally low number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood.
Prolonged G2 phase of cell cycle
MedGen UID:
871165
Concept ID:
C4025639
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
Deficient excision of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA
MedGen UID:
871166
Concept ID:
C4025640
Finding
Short thumb
MedGen UID:
98469
Concept ID:
C0431890
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital abnormality characterized by hypoplasia or absence of the thumb. It may be associated with other congenital abnormalities.
Absent radius
MedGen UID:
235613
Concept ID:
C1405984
Congenital Abnormality
Missing radius bone associated with congenital failure of development.
Absent thumb
MedGen UID:
480441
Concept ID:
C3278811
Finding
Absent thumb, i.e., the absence of both phalanges of a thumb and the associated soft tissues.
Microcephaly
MedGen UID:
473122
Concept ID:
C0424688
Finding
Occipito-frontal (head) circumference (OFC) less than -3 standard deviations compared to appropriate, age matched, normal standards (Ross JJ, Frias JL 1977, PMID:9683597). Alternatively, decreased size of the cranium.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Seuter S, Pehkonen P, Heikkinen S, Carlberg C
Biochim Biophys Acta 2013 Dec;1829(12):1266-75. Epub 2013 Nov 1 doi: 10.1016/j.bbagrm.2013.10.003. PMID: 24185200

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