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Items: 1 to 20 of 40

1.

Paclitaxel

Any formulation containing paclitaxel, an antimitotic taxane. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
99784
Concept ID:
C0144576
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

schizandrin A

MedGen UID:
78135
Concept ID:
C0074174
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Schizandra preparation

MedGen UID:
55097
Concept ID:
C0141729
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Decreased liver function

Elevations of the levels of SGOT and SGPT in the serum. SGOT (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase) and SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase) are transaminases primarily found in the liver and heart and are released into the bloodstream as the result of liver or heart damage. SGOT and SGPT are used clinically mainly as markers of liver damage. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39248
Concept ID:
C0086565
Pathologic Function
5.

Vincristine

The active ingredient in a drug used to treat acute leukemia. It is used in combination with other drugs to treat Hodgkin disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Vincristine is also being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. It blocks cell growth by stopping cell division. It is a type of vinca alkaloid and a type of antimitotic agent. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21863
Concept ID:
C0042679
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. . Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the liver. Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have. -Loss of appetite. -Nausea and vomiting. -Diarrhea. -Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements. -Stomach pain. -Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes. Some forms of hepatitis are mild, and others can be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5515
Concept ID:
C0019158
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Carcinoma

A malignant tumor arising from epithelial cells. Carcinomas that arise from glandular epithelium are called adenocarcinomas, those that arise from squamous epithelium are called squamous cell carcinomas, and those that arise from transitional epithelium are called transitional cell carcinomas (NCI Thesaurus). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
8.

Carcinoma

MedGen UID:
910818
Concept ID:
CN241453
Finding
9.

Accumulation

An increase of substance (e.g., proteinaceous fluid and glycogen) in either the intracellular space, extracellular space, or within a hollow organ or structure. [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
883922
Concept ID:
C4055506
Finding
10.

Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts

Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts (LCC), also known as Labrune syndrome, is characterized by a constellation of features restricted to the central nervous system, including leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts, resulting in spasticity, dystonia, seizures, and cognitive decline (summary by Labrune et al., 1996). See also cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC; 612199), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the CTC1 gene (613129) that shows phenotypic similarities to Labrune syndrome. CRMCC includes the neurologic findings of intracranial calcifications, leukodystrophy, and brain cysts, but also includes retinal vascular abnormalities and other systemic manifestations, such as osteopenia with poor bone healing, a high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, hair, skin, and nail changes, and anemia and thrombocytopenia. Although Coats plus syndrome and Labrune syndrome were initially thought to be manifestations of the same disorder, namely CRMCC, molecular evidence has excluded mutations in the CTC1 gene in patients with Labrune syndrome, suggesting that the 2 disorders are not allelic (Anderson et al., 2012; Polvi et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482830
Concept ID:
C3281200
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the major histologic type of malignant primary liver neoplasm. It is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. The major risk factors for HCC are chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, prolonged dietary aflatoxin exposure, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis due to other causes. Hepatoblastomas comprise 1 to 2% of all malignant neoplasms of childhood, most often occurring in children under 3 years of age. Hepatoblastomas are thought to be derived from undifferentiated hepatocytes (Taniguchi et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
389187
Concept ID:
C2239176
Neoplastic Process
12.

Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts

Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC), also known as Coats plus syndrome, is an autosomal recessive pleomorphic disorder characterized primarily by intracranial calcifications, leukodystrophy, and brain cysts, resulting in spasticity, ataxia, dystonia, seizures, and cognitive decline. Patients also have retinal telangiectasia and exudates (Coats disease) as well as extraneurologic manifestations, including osteopenia with poor bone healing and a high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and portal hypertension caused by vasculature ectasias in the stomach, small intestine, and liver. Some individuals also have hair, skin, and nail changes, as well as anemia and thrombocytopenia (summary by Anderson et al., 2012 and Polvi et al., 2012). Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications, and cysts (LCC), also known as Labrune syndrome (614561), has similar central nervous system features as CRMCC in the absence of extraneurologic or systemic manifestations. Although Coats plus syndrome and Labrune syndrome were initially thought to be manifestations of the same disorder, namely CRMCC, molecular evidence has excluded mutations in the CTC1 gene in patients with Labrune syndrome, suggesting that the 2 disorders are not allelic (Anderson et al., 2012; Polvi et al., 2012). Some features of CRMCC resemble those observed in dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., 127550), which is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous telomere-related genetic disorder. Genetic Heterogeneity of Cerebroretinal Microangiopathy With Calcifications And Cysts See also CRMCC2 (617341), caused by mutation in the STN1 gene (613128) on chromosome 10q24. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
383079
Concept ID:
C2677299
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Dystonia 10

Familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (referred to as familial PKD in this entry) is characterized by unilateral or bilateral involuntary movements precipitated by other sudden movements such as standing up from a sitting position, being startled, or changes in velocity; attacks include combinations of dystonia, choreoathetosis, and ballism, are sometimes preceded by an aura, and do not involve loss of consciousness. Attacks can be as frequent as 100 per day to as few as one per month. Attacks are usually a few seconds to five minutes in duration but can last several hours. Age of onset, severity and combinations of symptoms vary. Age of onset, typically in childhood and adolescence, ranges from four months to 57 years. The phenotype of PKD can include benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE), infantile convulsions and choreoathetosis (ICCA), hemiplegic migraine, migraine with and without aura, and episodic ataxia. Familial PKD is predominantly seen in males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
358268
Concept ID:
C1868682
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function; Qualitative Concept
15.

Chronic

Slow, creeping onset, slow progress and long continuance of disease manifestations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
Temporal Concept
16.

Chronic hepatitis

INFLAMMATION of the LIVER with ongoing hepatocellular injury for 6 months or more, characterized by NECROSIS of HEPATOCYTES and inflammatory cell (LEUKOCYTES) infiltration. Chronic hepatitis can be caused by viruses, medications, autoimmune diseases, and other unknown factors. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9223
Concept ID:
C0019189
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
18.

Adriblastin

MedGen UID:
423645
Concept ID:
C2936928
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Farmiblastina

MedGen UID:
307476
Concept ID:
C1512059
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
20.

Onkodox

MedGen UID:
297409
Concept ID:
C1564916
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
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