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1.

Tourette Syndrome

Tourette syndrome is a neurobehavioral disorder manifest particularly by motor and vocal tics and associated with behavioral abnormalities. Tics are sudden, brief, intermittent, involuntary or semi-voluntary movements (motor tics) or sounds (phonic or vocal tics). They typically consist of simple, coordinated, repetitive movements, gestures, or utterances that mimic fragments of normal behavior. Motor tics may range from simple blinking, nose twitching, and head jerking to more complex throwing, hitting, or making rude gestures. Phonic tics include sniffling, throat clearing, blowing, coughing, echolalia, or coprolalia. Males are affected about 3 times more often than females, and onset usually occurs between 3 and 8 years of age. By age 18 years, more than half of affected individuals are free of tics, but they may persist into adulthood (review by Jankovic, 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
21219
Concept ID:
C0040517
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Autism

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. Autism begins in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504569
Concept ID:
CN000674
Finding
3.

Autism spectrum disorders

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a condition that appears very early in childhood development, varies in severity, and is characterized by impaired social skills, communication problems, and repetitive behaviors. These difficulties can interfere with affected individuals' ability to function in social, academic, and employment settings. People with ASD also have an increased risk of psychiatric problems such as anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and eating disorders.From as early as 1 to 2 years of age, people with ASD have an impaired ability to interact with other people; they are often more comfortable dealing with objects. Affected individuals have difficulty understanding and using non-verbal social cues such as eye contact, facial expressions, gestures, and body language. Inability to recognize and use these cues makes it hard for affected individuals to understand the feelings of others or communicate their own feelings appropriately. Behavioral signs of ASD, such as reduced eye contact and social interaction, can sometimes be detected before age 2. However, the condition is usually diagnosed between ages 2 and 4, when more advanced communication and social skills, such as learning to play with others, typically begin to develop.Repetitive behaviors in ASD can include simple actions such as rocking, hand-flapping, or repetition of words or noises (echolalia). Affected individuals often dwell on or repeatedly express particular thoughts; this behavior is called perseveration. People with ASD tend to be rigid about their established routines and may strongly resist disruptions such as changes in schedule. They may also have difficulty tolerating sensory stimuli such as loud noises or bright lights.While social and communication difficulties and unusual behaviors define ASD, affected individuals can have a wide range of intellectual abilities and language skills. A majority of people with ASD have mild to moderate intellectual disability, while others have average to above-average intelligence. Some have particular cognitive abilities that greatly surpass their overall level of functioning, often in areas such as music, mathematics, or memory.Some people with ASD do not speak at all, while others use language fluently. However, fluent speakers with ASD often have problems associated with verbal communication. They might speak in a monotone voice, have unusual vocal mannerisms, or choose unusual topics of conversation.Several diagnoses that used to be classified as separate conditions are now grouped together under the diagnosis of ASD. For example, autistic disorder was a term that was used when affected individuals had limited or absent verbal communication, often in combination with intellectual disability. By contrast, Asperger syndrome was a diagnosis formerly applied to affected individuals of average or above-average intelligence who were not delayed in their language development. The broader diagnosis of ASD was established because many affected individuals fall outside of the strict definitions of the narrower diagnoses, and their intellectual and communication abilities may change over time. However, some individuals who were previously diagnosed with one of the subtypes now do not meet all the criteria of the new umbrella diagnosis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
307153
Concept ID:
C1510586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Autistic disorder of childhood onset

Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). Levy et al. (2009) provided a general review of autism and autism spectrum disorder, including epidemiology, characteristics of the disorder, diagnosis, neurobiologic hypotheses for the etiology, genetics, and treatment options. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autism Autism is considered to be a complex multifactorial disorder involving many genes. Accordingly, several loci have been identified, some or all of which may contribute to the phenotype. Included in this entry is AUTS1, which has been mapped to chromosome 7q22. Other susceptibility loci include AUTS3 (608049), which maps to chromosome 13q14; AUTS4 (608636), which maps to chromosome 15q11; AUTS5 (606053), which maps to chromosome 2q; AUTS6 (609378), which maps to chromosome 17q11; AUTS7 (610676), which maps to chromosome 17q21; AUTS8 (607373), which maps to chromosome 3q25-q27; AUTS9 (611015), which maps to chromosome 7q31; AUTS10 (611016), which maps to chromosome 7q36; AUTS11 (610836), which maps to chromosome 1q41; AUTS12 (610838), which maps to chromosome 21p13-q11; AUTS13 (610908), which maps to chromosome 12q14; AUTS14A (611913), which has been found in patients with a deletion of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS14B (614671), which has been found in patients with a duplication of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS15 (612100), associated with mutation in the CNTNAP2 gene (604569) on chromosome 7q35-q36; AUTS16 (613410), associated with mutation in the SLC9A9 gene (608396) on chromosome 3q24; AUTS17 (613436), associated with mutation in the SHANK2 gene (603290) on chromosome 11q13; and AUTS18 (615032), associated with mutation in the CHD8 gene (610528). (NOTE: the symbol 'AUTS2' has been used to refer to a gene on chromosome 7q11 (KIAA0442; 607270) and therefore is not used as a part of this autism locus series.) There are several X-linked forms of autism susceptibility: AUTSX1 (300425), associated with mutations in the NLGN3 gene (300336); AUTSX2 (300495), associated with mutations in NLGN4 (300427); AUTSX3 (300496), associated with mutations in MECP2 (300005); AUTSX4 (300830), associated with variation in the region on chromosome Xp22.11 containing the PTCHD1 gene (300828); AUTSX5 (300847), associated with mutations in the RPL10 gene (312173); and AUTSX6 (300872), associated with mutation in the TMLHE gene (300777). Folstein and Rosen-Sheidley (2001) reviewed the genetics of autism. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Motor tics

Movement-based tics affecting discrete muscle groups. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
199761
Concept ID:
C0751900
Sign or Symptom
6.

Asperger disease

a childhood disorder predominately affecting boys and similar to autism [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
68633
Concept ID:
C0236792
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Mental Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness. It's more than just a feeling of being sad or blue for a few days. If you are one of the more than 19 million teens and adults in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include. -Feeling sad or empty. -Loss of interest in favorite activities. -Overeating, or not wanting to eat at all. -Not being able to sleep, or sleeping too much. -Feeling very tired. -Feeling hopeless, irritable, anxious, or guilty. -Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Depression can happen at any age, but it often begins in teens and young adults. It is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants, talk therapy, or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8325
Concept ID:
C0011570
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
9.

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include. -Panic disorder . -Obsessive-compulsive disorder . -Post-traumatic stress disorder . -Phobias . -Generalized anxiety disorder . Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1613
Concept ID:
C0003467
Finding; Finding
10.

Tics

Repeated, individually recognizable, intermittent movements or movement fragments that are almost always briefly suppresable and are usually associated with awareness of an urge to perform the movement. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
853666
Concept ID:
C2169806
Sign or Symptom
11.

Intellectual disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Illness

A state of ill health, bodily malfunction, or discomfort. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
526241
Concept ID:
C0221423
Sign or Symptom
14.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) manifests at age 2-3 years or by first grade at the latest. The main symptoms are distractibility, impulsivity, hyperactivity, and often trouble organizing tasks and projects, difficulty going to sleep, and social problems from being aggressive, loud, or impatient. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506017
Concept ID:
CN006126
Finding
15.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Intellectual disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
334384
Concept ID:
C1843367
Finding
17.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Is it hard for your child to sit still? Does your child act without thinking first? Does your child start but not finish things? If so, your child may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nearly everyone shows some of these behaviors at times, but ADHD lasts more than 6 months and causes problems in school, at home and in social situations. ADHD is more common in boys than girls. It affects 3-5 percent of all American children. The main features of ADHD are. -Inattention. -Hyperactivity. -Impulsivity. No one knows exactly what causes ADHD. It sometimes runs in families, so genetics may be a factor. There may also be environmental factors. A complete evaluation by a trained professional is the only way to know for sure if your child has ADHD. Treatment may include medicine to control symptoms, therapy, or both. Structure at home and at school is important. Parent training may also help. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
220387
Concept ID:
C1263846
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Depression

An emotional state characterized by feelings of sadness, emptiness, and/or tearfulness. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
137999
Concept ID:
C0344315
Finding
19.

Hyperactivity

Excessive movement of muscles of the body as a whole, which may be associated with organic or psychological disorders. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
98406
Concept ID:
C0424295
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

X-linked inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the X chromosome. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66838
Concept ID:
C0241764
Genetic Function
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