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Items: 9

1.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
2.

Turcot syndrome

Lynch syndrome, caused by a germline pathogenic variant in a mismatch repair gene and associated with tumors exhibiting microsatellite instability (MSI), is characterized by an increased risk for colon cancer and cancers of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, small intestine, hepatobiliary tract, urinary tract, brain, and skin. In individuals with Lynch syndrome the following life time risks for cancer are seen: 52%-82% for colorectal cancer (mean age at diagnosis 44-61 years); 25%-60% for endometrial cancer in women (mean age at diagnosis 48-62 years); 6% to 13% for gastric cancer (mean age at diagnosis 56 years); and 4%-12% for ovarian cancer (mean age at diagnosis 42.5 years; approximately 30% are diagnosed before age 40 years). The risk for other Lynch syndrome-related cancers is lower, though substantially increased over general population rates. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78553
Concept ID:
C0265325
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Microsatellite Instability

A change that occurs in the DNA of certain cells (such as tumor cells) in which the number of repeats of microsatellites (short, repeated sequences of DNA) is different than the number of repeats that was in the DNA when it was inherited. The cause of microsatellite instability may be a defect in the ability to repair mistakes made when DNA is copied in the cell. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
182529
Concept ID:
C0920269
Pathologic Function
4.

Methylation

A chemical reaction in which a small molecule called a methyl group is added to other molecules. Methylation of proteins or nucleic acids may affect how they act in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
44400
Concept ID:
C0025723
Molecular Function; Natural Phenomenon or Process
5.

Instability

MedGen UID:
731956
Concept ID:
C1444783
Finding
6.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
7.

Recurrence (disease attribute)

The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
416712
Concept ID:
C2825055
Pathologic Function
8.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Base Pair Mismatch

The presence of an uncomplimentary base in double-stranded DNA caused by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or adenine, mismatching during homologous recombination, or errors in DNA replication. Multiple, sequential base pair mismatches lead to formation of heteroduplex DNA; (NUCLEIC ACID HETERODUPLEXES). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
109084
Concept ID:
C0600501
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
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