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Items: 18

1.

Gaucher disease

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42164
Concept ID:
C0017205
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Fabry disease

Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesia), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhidrosis, hypohidrosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, they may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity may have: (1) a cardiac variant phenotype that usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia, and proteinuria, but without ESRD; or (2) a renal variant phenotype, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain; or (3) cerebrovascular disease presenting as stroke or transient ischemic attack. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Mucopolysaccharidosis

Group of lysosomal storage diseases each caused by an inherited deficiency of an enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The diseases are progressive and often display a wide spectrum of clinical severity within one enzyme deficiency. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7733
Concept ID:
C0026703
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is a broad term that encompasses several common seizure phenotypes, classically including childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, ECA; see 600131), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE, EJA; see 607631), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME, EJM; see 254770), and epilepsy with grand mal seizures on awakening (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy, 1989). These recurrent seizures occur in the absence of detectable brain lesions and/or metabolic abnormalities. Seizures are initially generalized with a bilateral, synchronous, generalized, symmetrical EEG discharge (Zara et al., 1995; Lu and Wang, 2009). See also childhood absence epilepsy (ECA1; 600131), which has also been mapped to 8q24. Of note, benign neonatal epilepsy 2 (EBN2; 121201) is caused by mutation in the KCNQ3 gene (602232) on 8q24. Genetic Heterogeneity of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy EIG1 has been mapped to chromosome 8q24. Other loci or genes associated with EIG include EIG2 (606972) on 14q23; EIG3 (608762) on 9q32; EIG4 (609750) on 10q25; EIG5 (611934) on 10p11; EIG6 (611942), caused by mutation in the CACNA1H gene (607904) on 16p; EIG7 (604827) on 15q14; EIG8 (612899), caused by mutation in the CASR gene (601199) on 3q13.3-q21; EIG9 (607682), caused by mutation in the CACNB4 gene (601949) on 2q22-q23; EIG10 (613060), caused by mutation in the GABRD gene (137163) on 1p36.3; EIG11 (607628), caused by variation in the CLCN2 gene (600570) on 3q36; EIG12 (614847), caused by mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (138140) on 1p34; EIG13 (611136), caused by mutation in the GABRA1 gene (137160) on 5q34; and EIG14 (616685), caused by mutation in the SLC12A5 gene (606726) on 20q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75725
Concept ID:
C0270850
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Glycogen storage disease, type II

Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II), or Pompe disease, is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Classic infantile-onset Pompe disease may be apparent in utero but more often presents in the first two months of life with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, cardiomegaly and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hearing loss. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), classic infantile-onset Pompe disease commonly results in death in the first year of life from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction. The non-classic variant of infantile-onset Pompe disease usually presents within the first year of life with motor delays and/or slowly progressive muscle weakness, typically resulting in death from ventilatory failure in early childhood. Cardiomegaly can be seen, but heart disease is not a major source of morbidity. Late-onset (i.e., childhood, juvenile, and adult-onset) Pompe disease is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon in the late-onset form. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
6.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Disorder of lipid metabolism

An inherited metabolic disorder that affects the metabolism of the lipids. Representative examples include Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, and Niemann-Pick disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57587
Concept ID:
C0154251
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Sphingolipidosis

A group of inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of SPHINGOLIPIDS primarily in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and to a variable degree in the visceral organs. They are classified by the enzyme defect in the degradation pathway and the substrate accumulation (or storage). Clinical features vary in subtypes but neurodegeneration is a common sign. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
52453
Concept ID:
C0037899
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Unspecified encephalopathy

Encephalopathy is a term that means brain disease, damage, or malfunction. In general, encephalopathy is manifested by an altered mental state. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39314
Concept ID:
C0085584
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Glycogen storage disease

A group of inherited metabolic disorders involving the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of glycogen. In some patients, prominent liver involvement is presented. In others, more generalized storage of glycogen occurs, sometimes with prominent cardiac involvement. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6639
Concept ID:
C0017919
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Morphological abnormality of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Connective tissue disorder

Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the cellular glue that gives your tissues their shape and helps keep them strong. It also helps some of your tissues do their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. . There are over 200 disorders that impact connective tissue. Some, like cellulitis, are the result of an infection. Injuries can cause connective tissue disorders, such as scars. Others, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and osteogenesis imperfecta, are genetic. Still others, like scleroderma, have no known cause. Each disorder has its own symptoms and needs different treatment. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1098
Concept ID:
C0009782
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Glycogen storage disease type II, infantile

Pompe disease is an inherited disorder caused by the buildup of a complex sugar called glycogen in the body's cells. The accumulation of glycogen in certain organs and tissues, especially muscles, impairs their ability to function normally.Researchers have described three types of Pompe disease, which differ in severity and the age at which they appear. These types are known as classic infantile-onset, non-classic infantile-onset, and late-onset.The classic form of infantile-onset Pompe disease begins within a few months of birth. Infants with this disorder typically experience muscle weakness (myopathy), poor muscle tone (hypotonia), an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly), and heart defects. Affected infants may also fail to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive) and have breathing problems. If untreated, this form of Pompe disease leads to death from heart failure in the first year of life.The non-classic form of infantile-onset Pompe disease usually appears by age 1. It is characterized by delayed motor skills (such as rolling over and sitting) and progressive muscle weakness. The heart may be abnormally large (cardiomegaly), but affected individuals usually do not experience heart failure. The muscle weakness in this disorder leads to serious breathing problems, and most children with non-classic infantile-onset Pompe disease live only into early childhood.The late-onset type of Pompe disease may not become apparent until later in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. Late-onset Pompe disease is usually milder than the infantile-onset forms of this disorder and is less likely to involve the heart. Most individuals with late-onset Pompe disease experience progressive muscle weakness, especially in the legs and the trunk, including the muscles that control breathing. As the disorder progresses, breathing problems can lead to respiratory failure.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
148252
Concept ID:
C0751173
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Glycogen storage disease XV

MedGen UID:
462104
Concept ID:
C3150754
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Glycogen storage disease, type VI

Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD VI), a disorder of glycogenolysis caused by deficiency of hepatic glycogen phosphorylase, is characterized in the untreated child by hepatomegaly, growth retardation, ketotic hypoglycemia after an overnight fast, and mild hypoglycemia after prolonged fasting (e.g., during an illness). It is usually a relatively mild disorder that presents in infancy and childhood; however, severe and recurrent hypoglycemia, severe hepatomegaly, and post-prandial lactic acidosis have been described. The risk of hepatic adenoma formation in late childhood and adulthood is theoretically increased. Clinical and biochemical abnormalities may resolve with age; most adults are asymptomatic. Hypoglycemia can occur during pregnancy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6643
Concept ID:
C0017925
Disease or Syndrome
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