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Items: 7

1.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time.Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected, but reduced dim light (scotopic) vision often occurs in the early stages of the disease.Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and vision loss that worsens slowly over time. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other.The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
116576
Concept ID:
C0242383
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Macular degeneration

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 and older. It is a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. You need central vision to see objects clearly and to do tasks such as reading and driving. . AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. It does not hurt, but it causes cells in the macula to die. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD happens when abnormal blood vessels grow under the macula. These new blood vessels often leak blood and fluid. Wet AMD damages the macula quickly. Blurred vision is a common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease causes vision loss. Treatment can slow vision loss. It does not restore vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7434
Concept ID:
C0024437
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition which usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage to the retina. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506135
Concept ID:
CN006909
Finding
4.

Retinal degeneration

A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Finding; Pathologic Function
5.

Retinopathy

The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. In the center of this nerve tissue is the macula. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving and seeing fine detail. Retinal disorders affect this vital tissue. They can affect your vision, and some can be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are. -Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. -Diabetic eye disease. -Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is pulled away from the back of the eye. -Retinoblastoma - cancer of the retina. It is most common in young children. -Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula. -Macular hole - a small break in the macula that usually happens to people over 60. -Floaters - cobwebs or specks in your field of vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11209
Concept ID:
C0035309
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Aging

Progressive damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during life is thought to contribute to aging processes. This notion is supported by the observation of an aging-related accumulation in human mtDNA of oxidative and alkylation derivatives of nucleotides, of small deletions and insertions, and of large deletions, although their low frequency raises questions about their functional significance (Michikawa et al., 1999). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1376
Concept ID:
C0001811
Organism Function
7.

Age-related macular degeneration 8

Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a common complex disorder that affects the central region of the retina (macula) and is the leading cause of legal blindness in white Americans over age 65. Contributions of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility have been identified. The strongest nongenetic risk factor for ARMD is cigarette smoking. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ARMD, see 603075. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462420
Concept ID:
C3151070
Disease or Syndrome
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