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Items: 1 to 20 of 34

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Prostate cancer

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
3.

Gleason score

The score derived from universally embraced prostate cancer grading system developed by Dr. Donald F. Gleason in 1977. The system provides a reproducible description of the glandular architecture of prostate tissue to which a pathologist assigns a score depending primarily on the microscopic patterns of cancerous glands and cell morphology. The system correlates well with behavior at the extremes: Gleason 1+1 tumors are the most well differentiated, slowly growing and rarely spread; Gleason 4+5 tumors are the most poorly differentiated, often widely metastatic at the time of diagnosis. In the commoner intermediate grade tumors, however, behavior is extremely variable. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
468357
Concept ID:
C3203027
Finding
4.

Recurrence

The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
416712
Concept ID:
C2825055
Pathologic Function
5.

Positive Surgical Margin

Indicates the presence of tumor cells at the edge of a surgically excised specimen. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
318040
Concept ID:
C1709603
Finding
6.

Prostate cancer, hereditary, 2

Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually in middle age or later. In this disorder, certain cells in the prostate become abnormal and multiply without control or order to form a tumor. The prostate is a gland that surrounds the male urethra and helps produce semen, the fluid that carries sperm.Early prostate cancer usually does not cause pain, and most affected men exhibit no noticeable symptoms. Men are often diagnosed as the result of health screenings, such as a blood test for a substance called prostate specific antigen (PSA) or a medical procedure called a digital rectal exam. As the tumor grows larger, signs and symptoms can include difficulty starting or stopping the flow of urine, a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely, blood in the urine or semen, or pain with ejaculation. However, these changes can also occur with many other genitourinary conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not necessarily mean that a man has prostate cancer.The severity and outcome of prostate cancer varies widely. Early-stage prostate cancer can usually be treated successfully, and some older men have prostate tumors that grow so slowly that they may never cause health problems during their lifetime, even without treatment. In other men, however, the cancer is much more aggressive; in these cases, prostate cancer can be life-threatening.Some cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers. The signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer depend on where the disease has spread. If prostate cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the lymph nodes, bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Bone metastases of prostate cancer most often cause pain in the lower back, pelvis, or hips.A small percentage of all prostate cancers cluster in families. These hereditary cancers are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary prostate cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
761328
Concept ID:
C3539120
Neoplastic Process
7.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
8.

Epithelioma, malignant

MedGen UID:
639977
Concept ID:
C0553707
Neoplastic Process
9.

Prostate cancer, hereditary, 1

Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually in middle age or later. In this disorder, certain cells in the prostate become abnormal and multiply without control or order to form a tumor. The prostate is a gland that surrounds the male urethra and helps produce semen, the fluid that carries sperm.Early prostate cancer usually does not cause pain, and most affected men exhibit no noticeable symptoms. Men are often diagnosed as the result of health screenings, such as a blood test for a substance called prostate specific antigen (PSA) or a medical procedure called a digital rectal exam. As the tumor grows larger, signs and symptoms can include difficulty starting or stopping the flow of urine, a feeling of not being able to empty the bladder completely, blood in the urine or semen, or pain with ejaculation. However, these changes can also occur with many other genitourinary conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not necessarily mean that a man has prostate cancer.The severity and outcome of prostate cancer varies widely. Early-stage prostate cancer can usually be treated successfully, and some older men have prostate tumors that grow so slowly that they may never cause health problems during their lifetime, even without treatment. In other men, however, the cancer is much more aggressive; in these cases, prostate cancer can be life-threatening.Some cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers. The signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer depend on where the disease has spread. If prostate cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the lymph nodes, bones, lungs, liver, or brain. Bone metastases of prostate cancer most often cause pain in the lower back, pelvis, or hips.A small percentage of all prostate cancers cluster in families. These hereditary cancers are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary prostate cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
419810
Concept ID:
C2931456
Neoplastic Process
10.

Proliferation

MedGen UID:
137720
Concept ID:
C0334094
Pathologic Function
11.

Tumor Progression

A pathologic process in which alterations at the molecular level result in a more aggressive cytologic and phenotypic profile and clinical course of a neoplasm. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61255
Concept ID:
C0178874
Neoplastic Process
12.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Epithelial Neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm that arises from and is composed of epithelial cells. This category include adenomas, papillomas, and carcinomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
14.

Carcinomatosis

Carcinoma that has spread diffusely to an anatomic site or throughout the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104704
Concept ID:
C0205699
Neoplastic Process
15.

Cribriform Carcinoma

A carcinoma characterized by the presence of a cribriform architectural pattern. Representative examples include the intraductal cribriform breast carcinoma and invasive cribriform breast carcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104694
Concept ID:
C0205643
Neoplastic Process
16.

Tubular Adenocarcinoma

An infiltrating adenocarcinoma in which the malignant cells form tubular structures. Representative examples include the tubular breast carcinoma and the gastric tubular adenocarcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61428
Concept ID:
C0205645
Neoplastic Process
17.

Oxyphilic Adenocarcinoma

An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of large malignant epithelial cells with abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm (oncocytes). Representative examples include thyroid gland oncocytic follicular carcinoma, oncocytic breast carcinoma, and salivary gland oncocytic carcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61427
Concept ID:
C0205642
Neoplastic Process
18.

Undifferentiated Carcinoma

A usually aggressive malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of atypical cells which do not display evidence of glandular, squamous, or transitional cell differentiation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
60010
Concept ID:
C0205698
Neoplastic Process
19.

Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

A malignant epithelial neoplasm characterized by the presence of spindle cells and anaplastic morphologic features. Giant cells and a sarcomatous component may also be present. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
60009
Concept ID:
C0205697
Neoplastic Process
20.

Carcinoma, anaplastic

MedGen UID:
60008
Concept ID:
C0205696
Neoplastic Process
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