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Items: 15

1.

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow microenvironment, monoclonal protein in the blood or urine, and associated organ dysfunction (Palumbo and Anderson, 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
10122
Concept ID:
C0026764
Neoplastic Process
2.

Acute myelomonocytic leukemia

A pediatric acute myeloid leukemia involving both myeloid and monocytoid precursors. At least 20% of non-erythroid cells are of monocytic origin. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9732
Concept ID:
C0023479
Neoplastic Process
3.

Acute myeloid leukemia

CEBPA-associated familial acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is defined as AML in which a heterozygous germline CEBPA pathogenic variant is present in a family in which multiple individuals have AML. In contrast, sporadic CEBPA-associated AML is defined as AML in which a CEBPA pathogenic variant(s) is identified in leukemic cells but not in the non-leukemic cells. Too few individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML have been reported to be certain about the natural history of the disease. In the majority of individuals, the age of onset of familial AML appears to be earlier than sporadic AML; disease onset has been reported in persons as young as age 1.8 years and older than age 45 years. The prognosis of CEBPA-associated familial AML appears to be favorable compared with sporadic CEBPA-associated AML. Individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML who have been cured of their initial disease may be at greater risk of developing additional independent leukemic episodes in addition to the risk of relapse due to preexisting clones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9730
Concept ID:
C0023467
Neoplastic Process
4.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
5.

Acute monocytic leukemia

An acute myeloid leukemia in which 80% or more of the leukemic cells are of monocytic lineage including monoblasts, promonocytes, and MONOCYTES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7319
Concept ID:
C0023465
Neoplastic Process
6.

Acute myeloid leukemia, M6 type

Familial erythroleukemia is a leukemic or preleukemic state in which red cell proliferation is the predominant feature. Hematologic characteristics include particularly ineffective and hyperplastic erythropoiesis with megaloblastic components accompanied by myeloblastic proliferation of varying degree (Park et al., 2002). Park et al. (2002) discussed the evolution of the definition of 'erythroleukemia,' which is considered by most to be a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML; 601626). Controversy about the precise definition of erythroleukemia revolves around the number or percentage of erythroblasts and myeloblasts found in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation. In the French-American-British (FAB) classification system (Bennett et al., 1985), it is known as AML-M6, whereas in the revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification system (Harris et al., 1999), it is known as 'AML, not otherwise categorized' (Zini and D'Onofrio, 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7316
Concept ID:
C0023440
Neoplastic Process
7.

Epistaxis

Epistaxis, or nosebleed, refers to a hemorrhage localized in thenose. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
4996
Concept ID:
C0014591
Pathologic Function
8.

Weakness

Reduced strength of muscles. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
811372
Concept ID:
C3714552
Sign or Symptom
9.

Multiple myeloma

A malignant plasma cell tumor growing within soft tissue or within the skeleton. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505979
Concept ID:
CN005898
Finding
10.

Acute myeloid leukemia

A form of leukemia characterized by overproduction of an early myeloid cell. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505691
Concept ID:
CN004254
Finding
11.

Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

An acute myeloid leukemia arising as a result of the mutagenic effect of chemotherapy agents and/or ionizing radiation. (WHO, 2001) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
237008
Concept ID:
C1336735
Neoplastic Process
12.

Severe

Having a high degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between four and five standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
Qualitative Concept
13.

Myeloid leukemia

A leukemia that originates from a myeloid cell, that is the blood forming cells of the bone marrow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7320
Concept ID:
C0023470
Neoplastic Process
14.

Acute megakaryocytic leukemia

MedGen UID:
505962
Concept ID:
CN005861
Finding
15.

Acute myelomonocytic leukemia

A pediatric acute myeloid leukemia involving both myeloid and monocytoid precursors. At least 20% of non-erythroid cells are of monocytic origin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505695
Concept ID:
CN004266
Finding
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