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Items: 1 to 20 of 29

1.

Familial aplasia of the vermis

Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98464
Concept ID:
C0431399
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Retinal degeneration

A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Finding; Pathologic Function
3.

Renal cyst

A fluid filled sac in the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7215
Concept ID:
C0022679
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Renal cyst

A cyst is a fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts. . Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the cysts take the place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney failure. When PKD causes kidneys to fail - which usually happens after many years - people need dialysis or kidney transplantation. About half of people with the most common type of PKD end up with kidney failure. PKD also causes cysts in other parts of the body, such as the liver. . Symptoms of PKD include: -Pain in the back and lower sides. -Headaches. -Urinary tract infections. -Blood in the urine. Doctors diagnose PKD with imaging tests and family history. Treatments include medications, and, when people with PKD develop kidney failure, dialysis or kidney transplants. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) usually happens in people who are on dialysis. Unlike PKD, the kidneys are normal sized, and cysts do not form in other parts of the body. People with ACKD already have chronic kidney disease when they develop cysts. ACKD often has no symptoms. In most cases, the cysts are harmless and do not need treatment. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
776573
Concept ID:
C2173677
Finding
5.

Nephronophthisis type 6

MedGen UID:
754744
Concept ID:
C2959563
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Agenesis of cerebellar vermis

Congenital absence of the vermis of cerebellum. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505203
Concept ID:
CN002120
Finding
7.

Retinal degeneration

A deterioration of the retina. This nonspecific term is retained here because of its wide use in the literature, but if possible new annotations should indicate the precise type of retinal abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504488
Concept ID:
CN000512
Finding
8.

Nephronophthisis

Presence of cysts at the corticomedullary junction of the kidney in combination with tubulointerstitial fibrosis. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504336
Concept ID:
CN000090
Finding
9.

Renal insufficiency

A reduction in the level of performance of the kidneys in areas of function comprising the concentration of urine, removal of wastes, the maintenance of electrolyte balance, homeostasis of blood pressure, and calcium metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427392
Concept ID:
CN000083
Finding
10.

Abnormality of the kidney

An abnormality of the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427390
Concept ID:
CN000077
Finding
11.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 29

The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosome locus) in which pathogenic variants occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
350085
Concept ID:
C1861732
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Renal insufficiency

A reduction in the level of performance of the kidneys in areas of function comprising the concentration of urine, removal of wastes, the maintenance of electrolyte balance, homeostasis of blood pressure, and calcium metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
332529
Concept ID:
C1565489
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Nephronophthisis

The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recongnized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/ adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
146912
Concept ID:
C0687120
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Kidney disease

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. . Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Joubert syndrome 4

Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
335526
Concept ID:
C1846790
Disease or Syndrome
16.

TCTN2-Related Joubert Syndrome

MedGen UID:
833652
Concept ID:
CN229797
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Joubert syndrome 20

MedGen UID:
767149
Concept ID:
C3554235
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Joubert syndrome 18

MedGen UID:
766672
Concept ID:
C3553758
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Joubert syndrome 17

Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
766178
Concept ID:
C3553264
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Joubert syndrome 16

Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
482536
Concept ID:
C3280906
Disease or Syndrome
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