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Items: 12

1.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. You usually get the patches on your elbows, knees, scalp, back, face, palms and feet, but they can show up on other parts of your body. Some people who have psoriasis also get a form of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis. A problem with your immune system causes psoriasis. In a process called cell turnover, skin cells that grow deep in your skin rise to the surface. Normally, this takes a month. In psoriasis, it happens in just days because your cells rise too fast. . Psoriasis can be hard to diagnose because it can look like other skin diseases. Your doctor might need to look at a small skin sample under a microscope. Psoriasis can last a long time, even a lifetime. Symptoms come and go. Things that make them worse include. -Infections. -Stress. -Dry skin. -Certain medicines. Psoriasis usually occurs in adults. It sometimes runs in families. Treatments include creams, medicines, and light therapy. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10997
Concept ID:
C0033860
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Psoriasis

A skin abnormality characterized by redness and irritation, with thick, red skin that displays flaky, silver-white patches (scales). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505592
Concept ID:
CN003401
Finding
3.

Psoriasis susceptibility 1

Psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris; PV) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis that affects approximately 2% of the population. It is characterized by red, scaly skin patches that are usually found on the scalp, elbows, and knees, and may be associated with severe arthritis. The lesions are caused by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the dermis and epidermis. The usual age of onset of psoriasis is between 15 and 30 years, although it can present at any age (summary by Matthews et al., 1996). Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is a life-threatening disease characterized by sudden, repeated episodes of high-grade fever, generalized rash, and disseminated pustules, with hyperleukocytosis and elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein (123260) (summary by Marrakchi et al., 2011). GPP often presents in patients with existing or prior psoriasis vulgaris; however, GPP can develop without a history of PV (Sugiura et al., 2013). Palmoplantar pustulosis and acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau represent acral forms of pustular psoriasis that have historically been grouped with GPP (summary by Setta-Kaffetzi et al., 2013). Nestle et al. (2009) provided a detailed review of the pathogenesis and genetics of psoriasis. Genetic Heterogeneity of Psoriasis and Psoriasis Susceptibility PSORS2 (602723) is caused by mutation in the CARD14 gene (607211) on chromosome 17q25, and PSORS14 (614204) is caused by mutation in the IL36RN gene (605507) on chromosome 2q13. Psoriasis susceptibility loci include PSORS1 on 6p21.3; PSORS3 (601454) on 4q; PSORS4 on 1q21; PSORS5 (604316) on 3q21; PSORS6 (605364) on 19p; PSORS7 (605606) on 1p; PSORS8 (610707) on 16q; PSORS9 (607857) on 4q31; PSORS10 (612410) on 18p11; PSORS11 (612599) on 5q31-q33; PSORS12 (612950) on 20q13; PSORS13 (614070), conferred by variation in the TRAF3IP2 gene (607043) on 6q21; and PSORS15 (616106), conferred by variation in the AP1S3 gene (615781) on 2q36. An additional putative psoriasis candidate locus has been reported on 20p (Nair et al., 1997). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
357279
Concept ID:
C1867449
Finding
4.

Unrelated

Not connected or associated e.g. by kinship. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
99027
Concept ID:
C0445356
Finding
5.

Onset

The age group in which disease manifestations appear. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
64519
Concept ID:
C0206132
Quantitative Concept
6.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
7.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Papulosquamous dermatosis

A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
58187
Concept ID:
C0162818
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Disorder of skin

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin. -Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration. -Keeps harmful microbes out, preventing infections. -Helps you feel things like heat, cold, and pain. -Keeps your body temperature even. -Makes vitamin D when the sun shines on it. Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20777
Concept ID:
C0037274
Disease or Syndrome
10.

PSORIASIS 10, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO

MedGen UID:
854730
Concept ID:
C3888028
Finding
11.

Psoriasis 5, susceptibility to

MedGen UID:
347660
Concept ID:
C1858536
Finding
12.

Psoriasis 10, susceptibility to

MedGen UID:
280856
Concept ID:
C1538742
Gene or Genome
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