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Items: 1 to 20 of 38

1.

Eczema herpeticum

MedGen UID:
183219
Concept ID:
C0936250
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Eczematous rash

A form of dermatitis characterized by red, itchy, scaly, or crusty patches that can be chronic or intermittent.(NICHD) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3968
Concept ID:
C0013595
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Eczema

Eczema is a form of dermatitis. The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions and can be related to a number of underlying conditions. Manifestations of eczema can include dryness and recurring skin rashes with redness, skin edema, itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504663
Concept ID:
CN000902
Finding
4.

Dermatitis, atopic, 5

MedGen UID:
381292
Concept ID:
C1853900
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Dermatitis, atopic, 3

MedGen UID:
344173
Concept ID:
C1853964
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Dermatitis, atopic, 6

MedGen UID:
344154
Concept ID:
C1853899
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Dermatitis, atopic, 2

Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a disorder characterized by inflammation of the skin (dermatitis). The condition usually begins in early infancy, and it often disappears before adolescence. However, in some affected individuals the condition continues into adulthood; in others, it does not begin until adulthood. Hallmarks of atopic dermatitis include dry, itchy skin and red rashes that come and go. The rashes can occur on any part of the body, although the pattern tends to be different at different ages. In affected infants, the rashes commonly occur on the face, scalp, hands, and feet. In children, the rashes are usually found in the bend of the elbows and knees and on the front of the neck. In adolescents and adults, the rashes typically occur on the wrists, ankles, and eyelids in addition to the bend of the elbows and knees. Scratching the itchy skin can lead to oozing and crusting of the rashes and thickening and hardening (lichenification) of the skin. The itchiness can be so severe as to disturb sleep and impair a person's quality of life.The word "atopic" indicates an association with allergies. While atopic dermatitis is not always due to an allergic reaction, it is commonly associated with other allergic disorders: up to 60 percent of people with atopic dermatitis develop asthma or hay fever (allergic rhinitis) later in life, and up to 30 percent have food allergies. Atopic dermatitis is often the beginning of a series of allergic disorders, referred to as the "atopic march." Development of these disorders typically follows a pattern, beginning with atopic dermatitis, followed by food allergies, then hay fever, and finally asthma. However, not all individuals with atopic dermatitis will progress through the atopic march, and not all individuals with one allergic disease will develop others.Individuals with atopic dermatitis have an increased risk of developing other conditions related to inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and hair loss caused by a malfunctioning immune reaction (alopecia areata). They also have an increased risk of having a behavioral or psychiatric disorder, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or depression.In a particular subset of individuals with atopic dermatitis, the immune system is unable to protect the body from foreign invaders such as bacteria and fungi (which is known as immunodeficiency). These individuals are prone to recurrent infections. Most also have other allergic disorders, such as asthma, hay fever, and food allergies.Atopic dermatitis can also be a feature of separate disorders that have a number of signs and symptoms, which can include skin abnormalities and immunodeficiency. Some such disorders are Netherton syndrome; immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome; and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, metabolic wasting (SAM) syndrome. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
340100
Concept ID:
C1853965
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Herpes simplex

A group of acute infections caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 that is characterized by the development of one or more small fluid-filled vesicles with a raised erythematous base on the skin or mucous membrane. It occurs as a primary infection or recurs due to a reactivation of a latent infection. (Dorland, 27th ed.) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9234
Concept ID:
C0019348
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Inflammatory abnormality of the skin

An inflammatory process affecting the skin. Signs include red rash, itching, and blister formation. Representative examples are contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4233
Concept ID:
C0011603
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Inflammatory abnormality of the skin

The presence of inflammation of the skin. That is, an abnormality of the skin resulting from the local accumulation of fluid, plasma proteins, and leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
849741
Concept ID:
C3875321
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Dermatitis, atopic, 9

MedGen UID:
462114
Concept ID:
C3150764
Disease or Syndrome
12.

History

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
13.

Atopic dermatitis

MedGen UID:
338253
Concept ID:
C1847528
14.

History of

A record of a patient's background regarding health and the occurrence of disease events of the individual. In addition, personal medical history may be a variable in epidemiologic studies. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
82657
Concept ID:
C0262926
Finding
15.

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is a broad term that encompasses several common seizure phenotypes, classically including childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, ECA; see 600131), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE, EJA; see 607631), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME, EJM; see 254770), and epilepsy with grand mal seizures on awakening (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy, 1989). These recurrent seizures occur in the absence of detectable brain lesions and/or metabolic abnormalities. Seizures are initially generalized with a bilateral, synchronous, generalized, symmetrical EEG discharge (Zara et al., 1995; Lu and Wang, 2009). See also childhood absence epilepsy (ECA1; 600131), which has also been mapped to 8q24. Of note, benign neonatal epilepsy 2 (EBN2; 121201) is caused by mutation in the KCNQ3 gene (602232) on 8q24. Genetic Heterogeneity of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy EIG1 has been mapped to chromosome 8q24. Other loci or genes associated with EIG include EIG2 (606972) on 14q23; EIG3 (608762) on 9q32; EIG4 (609750) on 10q25; EIG5 (611934) on 10p11; EIG6 (611942), caused by mutation in the CACNA1H gene (607904) on 16p; EIG7 (604827) on 15q14; EIG8 (612899), caused by mutation in the CASR gene (601199) on 3q13.3-q21; EIG9 (607682), caused by mutation in the CACNB4 gene (601949) on 2q22-q23; EIG10 (613060), caused by mutation in the GABRD gene (137163) on 1p36.3; EIG11 (607628), caused by variation in the CLCN2 gene (600570) on 3q36; EIG12 (614847), caused by mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (138140) on 1p34; EIG13 (611136), caused by mutation in the GABRA1 gene (137160) on 5q34; and EIG14 (616685), caused by mutation in the SLC12A5 gene (606726) on 20q12. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
75725
Concept ID:
C0270850
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Infection of skin

An inflammatory process affecting the skin, caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. Examples of bacterial infection include carbuncles, furuncles, impetigo, erysipelas, and abscesses. Examples of viral infection include shingles, warts, molluscum contagiosum, and pityriasis rosea. Examples of parasitic infection include scabies and lice. Examples of fungal infection include athlete's foot, yeast infection, and ringworm. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
52365
Concept ID:
C0037278
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Dermatitis, atopic

Atopic dermatitis (ATOD), also known as eczema, is a common chronic pruritic inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic component. Onset typically occurs during the first 2 years of life (review by Soderhall et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Atopic Dermatitis Many inflammatory diseases, such as atopic eczema, are genetically complex, with multiple alleles at several loci thought to be involved in their pathogenesis. Several susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis have been identified: ATOD1 on chromosome 3q21, ATOD2 (605803) on chromosome 1q21, ATOD3 (605804) on chromosome 20p, ATOD4 (605805) on chromosome 17q25.3, ATOD5 (603165) on chromosome 13q12-q14, ATOD6 (605845) on chromosome 5q31-q33, ATOD7 (613064) on chromosome 11q13.5, ATOD8 (613518) on chromosome 4q22.1, and ATOD9 (613519) on chromosome 3p24. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
41502
Concept ID:
C0011615
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Herpes

Any inflammatory skin disease caused by a herpesvirus and characterized by the formation of small vesicles in clusters. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
6821
Concept ID:
C0019340
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Skin Diseases, Eczematous

Any of a variety of eruptive skin disorders characterized by erythema, oozing, vesiculation, and scaling. Etiology is varied. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
102472
Concept ID:
C0162817
Disease or Syndrome
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