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Items: 10

1.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
2.

Causative agent

Definition: A factor, such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or form of radiation, whose presence, excessive presence, or (in deficiency diseases) relative absence is essential, in whole or in part, for the occurrence of a condition. Constraint: The use of this participation is limited to observations.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
623004
Concept ID:
C0449411
Finding
3.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
4.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
61377

5.

Vaccines

A Type of medicine that creates an immune protection without the recipient experiencing the disease.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
52963
Concept ID:
C0042210
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Disease due to Gram-negative bacteria

Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88406
Concept ID:
C0085423
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Mutagenesis Process

OBSOLETE. The process by which genetic material undergoes a detectable and heritable structural change. There are three categories of mutation: genome mutations, involving addition or subtraction of one or more whole chromosomes; chromosome mutations, which alter the structure of chromosomes; and gene mutations, where the structure of a gene is altered at the molecular level. [ISBN:0198506732] [from GO]

MedGen UID:
86969
Concept ID:
C0079866
Molecular Function
8.

Tularemia

A plague-like disease of rodents, transmissible to man. It is caused by FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS and is characterized by fever, chills, headache, backache, and weakness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
22520
Concept ID:
C0041351
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Infections caused by bacteria and fungi, general, specified, or unspecified. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2161
Concept ID:
C0004615
Disease or Syndrome
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