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Items: 7

1.

Malabsorption

Impaired ability to absorb one or more nutrients from the intestine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
811453
Concept ID:
C3714745
Finding
2.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Sucrase-isomaltase deficiency

Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency is a disorder that affects a person's ability to digest certain sugars. People with this condition cannot break down the sugars sucrose and maltose. Sucrose (a sugar found in fruits, and also known as table sugar) and maltose (the sugar found in grains) are called disaccharides because they are made of two simple sugars. Disaccharides are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. Sucrose is broken down into glucose and another simple sugar called fructose, and maltose is broken down into two glucose molecules. People with congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency cannot break down the sugars sucrose and maltose, and other compounds made from these sugar molecules (carbohydrates).Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency usually becomes apparent after an infant is weaned and starts to consume fruits, juices, and grains. After ingestion of sucrose or maltose, an affected child will typically experience stomach cramps, bloating, excess gas production, and diarrhea. These digestive problems can lead to failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive) and malnutrition. Most affected children are better able to tolerate sucrose and maltose as they get older.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
220924
Concept ID:
C1283620
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Abnormality of the intestine

An abnormality of the intestine. The closely related term enteropathy is used to refer to any disease of the intestine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7130
Concept ID:
C0021831
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
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