Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 36

1.

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the absence of abnormal loading conditions (hypertension, valve disease) or coronary artery disease sufficient to cause global systolic impairment. Right ventricular dilation and dysfunction may be present but are not necessary for the diagnosis. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504887
Concept ID:
CN001497
Finding
2.

Cardiomyopathy

A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504883
Concept ID:
CN001491
Finding
3.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1A

LMNA-related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is caused by pathogenic variants in LMNA and is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and/or reduced systolic function preceded or accompanied by significant conduction system disease and/or arrhythmias. LMNA-related DCM usually presents in early to mid-adulthood with symptomatic conduction system disease or arrhythmias, or with symptomatic DCM including heart failure or embolus from a left ventricular mural thrombus. Sudden cardiac death can occur, and in some instances is the presenting manifestation; sudden cardiac death may occur with minimal or no systolic dysfunction. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
258500
Concept ID:
C1449563
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including . - Heart failure . - Abnormal heart rhythms . - Heart valve problems. - Sudden cardiac arrest. Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
209232
Concept ID:
C0878544
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Familial dilated cardiomyopathy

Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. It occurs when heart (cardiac) muscle becomes thin and weakened in at least one chamber of the heart, causing the open area of the chamber to become enlarged (dilated). As a result, the heart is unable to pump blood as efficiently as usual. To compensate, the heart attempts to increase the amount of blood being pumped through the heart, leading to further thinning and weakening of the cardiac muscle. Over time, this condition results in heart failure.It usually takes many years for symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy to cause health problems. They typically begin in mid-adulthood, but can occur at any time from infancy to late adulthood. Signs and symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy can include an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), shortness of breath (dyspnea), extreme tiredness (fatigue), fainting episodes (syncope), and swelling of the legs and feet. In some cases, the first sign of the disorder is sudden cardiac death. The severity of the condition varies among affected individuals, even in members of the same family.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
90951
Concept ID:
C0340427
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Primary dilated cardiomyopathy

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2880
Concept ID:
C0007193
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hypertrophy

Cell size enlargement due to the increase in the amount of cytoplasm and its constituent organelles. The cells are larger but otherwise the appearance is unchanged. [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
5703
Concept ID:
C0020564
Pathologic Function
8.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

MedGen UID:
893691
Concept ID:
CN239543
Finding
9.

Cardiomyopathies

MedGen UID:
881076
Concept ID:
CN236666
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Liquid

MedGen UID:
725915
Concept ID:
C1304698
Finding
11.

Pathogenesis

specific processes that generate the ability of an organism to cause disease [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
195936
Concept ID:
C0699748
Pathologic Function
12.

Primary familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is typically defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Such LVH occurs in a non-dilated ventricle in the absence of other cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the observed magnitude of increased LV wall thickness, such as pressure overload (e.g., long-standing hypertension, aortic stenosis) or storage/infiltrative disorders (e.g., Fabry disease, amyloidosis). The clinical manifestations of HCM range from asymptomatic LVH to progressive heart failure to sudden cardiac death (SCD), and vary from individual to individual even within the same family. Common symptoms include shortness of breath (particularly with exertion), chest pain, palpitations, orthostasis, presyncope, and syncope. Most often the LVH of HCM becomes apparent during adolescence or young adulthood, although it may also develop late in life, in infancy, or in childhood. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
183649
Concept ID:
C0949658
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Ectatic

The condition of being dilated or stretched. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
148572
Concept ID:
C0700124
Finding
14.

Unrelated

Not connected or associated e.g. by kinship. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
99027
Concept ID:
C0445356
Finding
15.

Diffuse Cutaneous Mastocytosis

A form of cutaneous mastocytosis that is characterized by a diffuse erythrodermic rash rather than the maculopapular infiltrates seen in URTICARIA PIGMENTOSA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
44303
Concept ID:
C0024901
Neoplastic Process
16.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of increased ventricular wall thickness or mass in the absence of loading conditions (hypertension, valve disease) sufficient to cause the observed abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2881
Concept ID:
C0007194
Disease or Syndrome
17.

PMS-Tryptophan

MedGen UID:
327774
Concept ID:
C1564485
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Ardeydorm

MedGen UID:
296070
Concept ID:
C1564481
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Lyphan

MedGen UID:
289838
Concept ID:
C1564484
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Pharmacologic Substance
20.

L-Tryptophan-ratiopharm

MedGen UID:
289837
Concept ID:
C1564483
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Pharmacologic Substance
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center