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Cataract

MedGen UID:
39462
Concept ID:
C0086543
Acquired Abnormality; Finding; Finding
Synonyms: Cataracts
SNOMED CT: Cataract (128306009); Cat. - Cataract (193570009); Cataract (193570009); Cataract form (247053007)
 
OMIM® Phenotypic series: PS116200
HPO: HP:0000518
Orphanet: ORPHA98640

Definition

A cataract is an opacity or clouding that develops in the crystalline lens of the eye or in its capsule. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Gorlin syndrome
MedGen UID:
2554
Concept ID:
C0004779
Neoplastic Process
Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is characterized by the development of multiple jaw keratocysts, frequently beginning in the second decade of life, and/or basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) usually from the third decade onward. Approximately 60% of individuals have a recognizable appearance with macrocephaly, frontal bossing, coarse facial features, and facial milia. Most individuals have skeletal anomalies (e.g., bifid ribs, wedge-shaped vertebrae). Ectopic calcification, particularly in the falx, is present in more than 90% of affected individuals by age 20 years. Cardiac and ovarian fibromas occur in approximately 2% and 20% of individuals respectively. Approximately 5% of all children with NBCCS develop medulloblastoma (primitive neuroectodermal tumor), generally the desmoplastic subtype. The risk of developing medulloblastoma is substantially higher in individuals with an SUFU pathogenic variant (33%) than in those with a PTCH1 pathogenic variant (<2%). Peak incidence is at age one to two years. Life expectancy in NBCCS is not significantly different from average.
5p partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
41345
Concept ID:
C0010314
Disease or Syndrome
Cri-du-chat syndrome was first described by Lejeune et al. (1963) as a hereditary congenital syndrome associated with deletion of part of the short arm of chromosome 5. The deletions can vary in size from extremely small and involving only band 5p15.2 to the entire short arm. Although the majority of deletions arise as new mutations, approximately 12% result from unbalanced segregation of translocations or recombination involving a pericentric inversion in one of the parents.
Dermatitis, atopic
MedGen UID:
41502
Concept ID:
C0011615
Disease or Syndrome
Atopic dermatitis (ATOD), also known as eczema, is a common chronic pruritic inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic component. Onset typically occurs during the first 2 years of life (review by Soderhall et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Atopic Dermatitis Many inflammatory diseases, such as atopic eczema, are genetically complex, with multiple alleles at several loci thought to be involved in their pathogenesis. Several susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis have been identified: ATOD1 on chromosome 3q21, ATOD2 (605803) on chromosome 1q21, ATOD3 (605804) on chromosome 20p, ATOD4 (605805) on chromosome 17q25.3, ATOD5 (603165) on chromosome 13q12-q14, ATOD6 (605845) on chromosome 5q31-q33, ATOD7 (613064) on chromosome 11q13.5, ATOD8 (613518) on chromosome 4q22.1, and ATOD9 (613519) on chromosome 3p24.
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Disease or Syndrome
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Cowden syndrome
MedGen UID:
5420
Concept ID:
C0018553
Neoplastic Process
Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley syndrome (BRRS; 153480) share clinical characteristics such as hamartomatous polyps of the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous lesions, and increased risk of developing neoplasms. Furthermore, both conditions and several other distinctive phenotypes are caused by mutations in the PTEN gene. For this reason Marsh et al. (1999) suggested that the spectrum of disorders be referred to as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS). Approximately 80% of CS patients have PTEN mutations (Blumenthal and Dennis, 2008). Some patients with Cowden syndrome may have immune system defects resulting in increased susceptibility to infections (summary by Browning et al., 2015). Blumenthal and Dennis (2008) provided a detailed review of PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Genetic Heterogeneity of Cowden Syndrome Also see Cowden syndrome-2 (CWS2; 612359), caused by mutation in the SDHB gene (185470) on chromosome 1p36; CWS3 (615106), caused by mutation in the SDHD gene (602690) on chromosome 11q23; CWS4 (615107), caused by hypermethylation of the promoter of the KLLN gene (612105), which shares the same transcription site as the PTEN gene, on chromosome 10q23; CWS5 (615108), caused by mutation in the PIK3CA gene (171834) on chromosome 3q26; CWS6 (615109), caused by mutation in the AKT1 gene (164730) on chromosome 14q32; and CWS7 (616858), caused by mutation in the SEC23B gene (610512) on chromosome 20p11.
Incontinentia pigmenti syndrome
MedGen UID:
7049
Concept ID:
C0021171
Disease or Syndrome
Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a disorder that affects the skin, hair, teeth, nails, eyes, and central nervous system; it occurs primarily in females and on occasion in males. Characteristic skin lesions evolve through four stages: I. Blistering (birth to age ~4 months). II. Wart-like rash (for several months). III. Swirling macular hyperpigmentation (age ~6 months into adulthood). IV. Linear hypopigmentation. Alopecia, hypodontia, abnormal tooth shape, and dystrophic nails are observed. Neovascularization of the retina, present in some individuals, predisposes to retinal detachment. Neurologic findings including seizures, intellectual disability, and developmental delays are occasionally seen.
Hypomelanosis of Ito
MedGen UID:
5920
Concept ID:
C0022283
Congenital Abnormality
A large brown, blue, or gray hamartoma of dermal melanocytes, usually on the shoulder and upper arm that is most commonly found in Asian populations and in females. It is sometimes associated with sensory changes in the involved skin area, but very rarely becomes cancerous.
Marfan syndrome
MedGen UID:
44287
Concept ID:
C0024796
Disease or Syndrome
Marfan syndrome, a systemic disorder of connective tissue with a high degree of clinical variability, comprises a broad phenotypic continuum ranging from mild (features of Marfan syndrome in one or a few systems) to severe and rapidly progressive neonatal multiorgan disease. Cardinal manifestations involve the ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems. Ocular findings include myopia (the most common ocular feature); ectopia lentis (seen in approximately 60% of affected individuals); and an increased risk for retinal detachment, glaucoma, and early cataracts. Skeletal system manifestations include bone overgrowth and joint laxity; disproportionately long extremities for the size of the trunk (dolichostenomelia); overgrowth of the ribs that can push the sternum in (pectus excavatum) or out (pectus carinatum); and scoliosis that ranges from mild to severe and progressive. The major morbidity and early mortality in the Marfan syndrome relate to the cardiovascular system and include dilatation of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva (predisposing to aortic tear and rupture), mitral valve prolapse with or without regurgitation, tricuspid valve prolapse, and enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery. Severe and prolonged regurgitation of the mitral and/or aortic valve can predispose to left ventricular dysfunction and occasionally heart failure. With proper management, the life expectancy of someone with Marfan syndrome approximates that of the general population.
Steinert myotonic dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
10239
Concept ID:
C0027126
Disease or Syndrome
Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystem disorder that affects skeletal and smooth muscle as well as the eye, heart, endocrine system, and central nervous system. The clinical findings, which span a continuum from mild to severe, have been categorized into three somewhat overlapping phenotypes: mild, classic, and congenital. Mild DM1 is characterized by cataract and mild myotonia (sustained muscle contraction); life span is normal. Classic DM1 is characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, myotonia, cataract, and often cardiac conduction abnormalities; adults may become physically disabled and may have a shortened life span. Congenital DM1 is characterized by hypotonia and severe generalized weakness at birth, often with respiratory insufficiency and early death; intellectual disability is common.
Nail-patella syndrome
MedGen UID:
10257
Concept ID:
C0027341
Disease or Syndrome
Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) involves a classic clinical tetrad of changes in the nails, knees, and elbows, and the presence of iliac horns. Nail changes are the most constant feature of NPS. Nails may be absent, hypoplastic, or dystrophic; ridged longitudinally or horizontally; pitted; discolored; separated into two halves by a longitudinal cleft or ridge of skin; and thin or (less often) thickened. The patellae may be small, irregularly shaped, or absent. Elbow abnormalities may include limitation of extension, pronation, and supination; cubitus valgus; and antecubital pterygia. Iliac horns are bilateral, conical, bony processes that project posteriorly and laterally from the central part of the iliac bones of the pelvis. Renal involvement, first manifest as proteinuria with or without hematuria, occurs in 30%-50% of affected individuals; end-stage renal disease (ESRD) occurs in about 5% of affected individuals. Primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension occur at increased frequency and at a younger age than in the general population.
Phenylketonuria
MedGen UID:
19244
Concept ID:
C0031485
Disease or Syndrome
Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine and produces a spectrum of disorders. The risk of adverse outcome varies based on the degree of PAH deficiency. Without effective therapy, most individuals with severe PAH deficiency, known as classic PKU, develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Affected individuals on an unrestricted diet who have phenylalanine levels above normal but below 1200 µmol/L (20 mg/dL) are at much lower risk for impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment.
Pseudohypoparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
46178
Concept ID:
C0033806
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of GNAS inactivation include the phenotypes pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia, Ib, and Ic (PHP-Ia, -Ib, -Ic), pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), and osteoma cutis (OC). PHP-Ia and PHP-Ic are characterized by: End-organ resistance to endocrine hormones including parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (LH and FSH), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and CNS neurotransmitters (leading to obesity and variable degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay); and The Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype (short stature, round facies, and subcutaneous ossifications) and brachydactyly type E (shortening mainly of the 4th and/or 5th metacarpals and metatarsals and distal phalanx of the thumb). Although PHP-Ib is characterized principally by PTH resistance, some individuals also have partial TSH resistance and mild features of AHO (e.g., brachydactyly). PPHP, a more limited form of PHP-Ia, is characterized by various manifestations of the AHO phenotype without the hormone resistance or obesity. POH and OC are even more restricted variants of PPHP: POH consists of dermal ossification beginning in infancy, followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. OC consists of extra-skeletal ossification that is limited to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.
Pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
10995
Concept ID:
C0033835
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of GNAS inactivation include the phenotypes pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia, Ib, and Ic (PHP-Ia, -Ib, -Ic), pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), and osteoma cutis (OC). PHP-Ia and PHP-Ic are characterized by: End-organ resistance to endocrine hormones including parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (LH and FSH), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and CNS neurotransmitters (leading to obesity and variable degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay); and The Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype (short stature, round facies, and subcutaneous ossifications) and brachydactyly type E (shortening mainly of the 4th and/or 5th metacarpals and metatarsals and distal phalanx of the thumb). Although PHP-Ib is characterized principally by PTH resistance, some individuals also have partial TSH resistance and mild features of AHO (e.g., brachydactyly). PPHP, a more limited form of PHP-Ia, is characterized by various manifestations of the AHO phenotype without the hormone resistance or obesity. POH and OC are even more restricted variants of PPHP: POH consists of dermal ossification beginning in infancy, followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. OC consists of extra-skeletal ossification that is limited to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.
Phytanic acid storage disease
MedGen UID:
11161
Concept ID:
C0034960
Disease or Syndrome
Refsum disease is characterized by anosmia and early-onset retinitis pigmentosa, which are both universal findings with variable combinations of neuropathy, deafness, ataxia, and ichthyosis. Onset of symptoms ranges from age seven months to older than age 50 years. Cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure caused by cardiomyopathy are potentially severe health problems which develop later in life.
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome
MedGen UID:
48517
Concept ID:
C0035934
Disease or Syndrome
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, broad and often angulated thumbs and great toes, short stature, and moderate to severe intellectual disability. The characteristic craniofacial features are downslanted palpebral fissures, low hanging columella, high palate, grimacing smile, and talon cusps. Prenatal growth is often normal; however, height, weight, and head circumference percentiles rapidly drop in the first few months of life. Obesity may occur in childhood or adolescence. IQ scores range from 25 to 79; average IQ is between 36 and 51. Other variable findings are coloboma, cataract, congenital heart defects, renal abnormalities, and cryptorchidism.
Schwartz Jampel syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
19892
Concept ID:
C0036391
Disease or Syndrome
Schwartz-Jampel syndrome is a rare condition characterized by permanent muscle stiffness (myotonia) and bone abnormalities known as chondrodysplasia. The signs and symptoms of this condition become apparent sometime after birth, usually in early childhood. Either muscle stiffness or chondrodysplasia can appear first. The muscle and bone abnormalities worsen in childhood, although most affected individuals have a normal lifespan. The specific features of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome vary widely.Myotonia involves continuous tensing (contraction) of muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles) throughout the body. This sustained muscle contraction causes stiffness that interferes with eating, sitting, walking, and other movements. Sustained contraction of muscles in the face leads to a fixed, "mask-like" facial expression with narrow eye openings (blepharophimosis) and pursed lips. This facial appearance is very specific to Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Affected individuals may also be nearsighted and experience abnormal blinking or spasms of the eyelids (blepharospasm).Chondrodysplasia affects the development of the skeleton, particularly the long bones in the arms and legs and the bones of the hips. These bones are shortened and unusually wide at the ends, so affected individuals have short stature. The long bones may also be abnormally curved (bowed). Other bone abnormalities associated with Schwartz-Jampel syndrome include a protruding chest (pectus carinatum), abnormal curvature of the spine, flattened bones of the spine (platyspondyly), and joint abnormalities called contractures that further restrict movement.Researchers originally described two types of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Type 1 has the signs and symptoms described above, while type 2 has more severe bone abnormalities and other health problems and is usually life-threatening in early infancy. Researchers have since discovered that the condition they thought was Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 2 is actually part of another disorder, Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome, which is caused by mutations in a different gene. They have recommended that the designation Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 2 no longer be used.
Werner syndrome
MedGen UID:
12147
Concept ID:
C0043119
Disease or Syndrome
Werner syndrome is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Individuals with Werner syndrome develop normally until the end of the first decade. The first sign is the lack of a growth spurt during the early teen years. Early findings (usually observed in the 20s) include loss and graying of hair, hoarseness, and scleroderma-like skin changes, followed by bilateral ocular cataracts, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, skin ulcers, and osteoporosis in the 30s. Myocardial infarction and cancer are the most common causes of death; the mean age of death in individuals with Werner syndrome is 54 years.
Zellweger syndrome
MedGen UID:
21958
Concept ID:
C0043459
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger spectrum disorder (ZSD) is a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe to mild. While individual phenotypes (e.g., Zellweger syndrome [ZS], neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy [NALD], and infantile Refsum disease [IRD]) were described in the past before the biochemical and molecular bases of this spectrum were fully determined, the term ZSD is now used to refer to all individuals with a PEX gene defect regardless of phenotype. Individuals with ZSD usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. Affected newborns are hypotonic and feed poorly. They have distinctive facies, congenital malformations (neuronal migration defects associated with neonatal-onset seizures, renal cysts, and bony stippling [chondrodysplasia punctata] of the patella[e] and other long bones), and liver disease which can be severe. Infants with severe ZSD are significantly impaired and typically die during the first year of life, usually having made no developmental progress. Individuals with intermediate/milder ZSD do not have congenital malformations, but rather progressive peroxisome dysfunction variably manifest as sensory loss (secondary to retinal dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss); neurologic involvement (ataxia, polyneuropathy, and leukodystrophy); liver dysfunction; adrenal insufficiency; and renal oxalate stones. While hypotonia and developmental delays are typical, intellect can be normal. Some have osteopenia; almost all have ameleogenesis imperfecta in the secondary teeth.
Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa
MedGen UID:
36311
Concept ID:
C0079474
Disease or Syndrome
Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) comprises two types based on inheritance pattern: Recessive DEB, including severe generalized (RDEB-sev gen; formerly called Hallopeau-Siemens type [RDEB-HS]) and generalized other (RDEB-O; formerly called non-Hallopeau-Siemens type [RDEB-non-HS]). Dominant DEB (DDEB). In RDEB-sev gen, blisters affecting the whole body may be present in the neonatal period. Oral involvement may lead to mouth blistering, fusion of the tongue to the floor of the mouth, and progressive diminution of the size of the oral cavity. Esophageal erosions can lead to webs and strictures that can cause severe dysphagia. Consequently, severe nutritional deficiency and secondary problems are common. Corneal erosions can lead to scarring and loss of vision. Blistering of the hands and feet followed by scarring fuses the digits into "mitten" hands and feet, a hallmark of this disorder. The lifetime risk of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma is higher than 90%. In contrast, the blistering in the less severe forms of RDEB-O may be localized to hands, feet, knees, and elbows with or without involvement of flexural areas and the trunk, and without the severe, mutilating scarring seen in RDEB-sev gen. In DDEB, blistering is often mild and limited to hands, feet, knees, and elbows, but nonetheless heals with scarring. Dystrophic nails, especially toenails, are common and may be the only manifestation of DDEB.
Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome, type 2
MedGen UID:
39126
Concept ID:
C0085860
Disease or Syndrome
Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type II (APS2), or Schmidt syndrome, is characterized by the presence of autoimmune Addison disease in association with either autoimmune thyroid disease or type I diabetes mellitus, or both. Chronic candidiasis is not present. APS2 may occur at any age and in both sexes, but is most common in middle-aged females and is very rare in childhood (summary by Betterle et al., 2004). See 240300 for a phenotypic description of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS1).
Hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
56416
Concept ID:
C0162361
Disease or Syndrome
Hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia 2, or Clouston syndrome (referred to as HED2 throughout this GeneReview) is characterized by partial or total alopecia, dystrophy of the nails, hyperpigmentation of the skin (especially over the joints), and clubbing of the fingers. Sparse scalp hair and dysplastic nails are seen early in life. In infancy, scalp hair is wiry, brittle, patchy, and pale; progressive hair loss may lead to total alopecia by puberty. The nails may be milky white in early childhood; they gradually become dystrophic, thick, and distally separated from the nail bed. Palmoplantar keratoderma may develop during childhood and increases in severity with age. The clinical manifestations are highly variable even within the same family.
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
61231
Concept ID:
C0175694
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a congenital multiple anomaly syndrome caused by an abnormality in cholesterol metabolism resulting from deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase. It is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and multiple major and minor malformations. The malformations include distinctive facial features, cleft palate, cardiac defects, underdeveloped external genitalia in males, postaxial polydactyly, and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes. The clinical spectrum is wide and individuals have been described with normal development and only minor malformations.
Aicardi syndrome
MedGen UID:
61236
Concept ID:
C0175713
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi syndrome was classically characterized by a triad of features: agenesis of the corpus callosum, distinctive chorioretinal lacunae, and infantile spasms. However, it is now well recognized that several other important findings are typically present in girls with Aicardi syndrome. Neurologic examination can reveal microcephaly, axial hypotonia, and appendicular hypertonia with spasticity. Moderate to severe global developmental delay and intellectual disability are expected. Many girls with Aicardi syndrome develop seizures prior to age three months, and most before age one year. Ongoing medically refractory epilepsy with a variety of seizure types develops over time. Costovertebral defects are common and can lead to marked scoliosis in up to one third of affected individuals. Other features include characteristic facial features, gastrointestinal difficulties, small hands, vascular malformations and pigmentary lesions of the skin, increased incidence of tumors, lower growth rate after ages seven to nine years, and precocious or delayed puberty. Survival is highly variable, with the mean age of death about 8.3 years and the median age of death about 18.5 years.
Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
66320
Concept ID:
C0220722
Congenital Abnormality
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome is an autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by microcephaly, congenital cataracts, severe mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, and arthrogryposis (summary by Jaakkola et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cerebrooculofacioskeletal Syndrome See also COFS2 (610756), caused by mutation in the ERCC2 gene (126340); COFS3 (616570), caused by mutation in the ERCC5 gene (133530); and COFS4 (610758), caused by mutation in the ERCC1 gene (126380).
Cholestanol storage disease
MedGen UID:
116041
Concept ID:
C0238052
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a lipid storage disease characterized by infantile-onset diarrhea, childhood-onset cataract, adolescent- to young adult-onset tendon xanthomas, and adult-onset progressive neurologic dysfunction (dementia, psychiatric disturbances, pyramidal and/or cerebellar signs, dystonia, atypical parkinsonism, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures). Chronic diarrhea from infancy may be the earliest clinical manifestation. In approximately 75% of affected individuals, cataracts are the first finding, often appearing in the first decade of life. Xanthomas appear in the second or third decade; they occur on the Achilles tendon, the extensor tendons of the elbow and hand, the patellar tendon, and the neck tendons. Xanthomas have been reported in the lung, bones, and central nervous system. Some individuals show cognitive impairment from early infancy, whereas the majority have normal or only slightly impaired intellectual function until puberty; dementia with slow deterioration in intellectual abilities occurs in the 20s in more than 50% of individuals. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as behavioral changes, hallucinations, agitation, aggression, depression, and suicide attempts may be prominent. Pyramidal signs (i.e., spasticity) and/or cerebellar signs almost invariably become evident between ages 20 and 30 years. The biochemical abnormalities that distinguish CTX from other conditions with xanthomas include high plasma and tissue cholestanol concentration, normal-to-low plasma cholesterol concentration, decreased chenodeoxycholic acid, increased concentration of bile alcohols and their glyconjugates, and increased concentrations of cholestanol and apolipoprotein B in cerebrospinal fluid.
Neu-Laxova syndrome
MedGen UID:
78537
Concept ID:
C0265218
Disease or Syndrome
Neu-Laxova syndrome is an autosomal recessive lethal multiple malformation syndrome characterized by ichthyosis, marked intrauterine growth restriction, microcephaly, short neck, central nervous system anomalies (lissencephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia and/or abnormal/agenesis of the corpus callosum), limb deformities, hypoplastic lungs, edema, and abnormal facial features including severe proptosis with ectropion, hypertelorism, micrognathia, flattened nose, and malformed ears (summary by Manning et al., 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Neu-Laxova Syndrome NLS2 (616038) is caused by mutation in the PSAT1 gene (610936) on chromosome 9q21.
Miller Dieker syndrome
MedGen UID:
78538
Concept ID:
C0265219
Disease or Syndrome
LIS1-associated lissencephaly includes Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), isolated lissencephaly sequence (ILS), and (rarely) subcortical band heterotopia (SBH). Lissencephaly and SBH are cortical malformations caused by deficient neuronal migration during embryogenesis. Lissencephaly refers to a "smooth brain" with absent gyri (agyria) or abnormally wide gyri (pachygyria). SBH refers to a band of heterotopic gray matter located just beneath the cortex and separated from it by a thin zone of normal white matter. MDS is characterized by lissencephaly, typical facial features, and severe neurologic abnormalities. ILS is characterized by lissencephaly and its direct sequelae: developmental delay, intellectual disability, and seizures.
Walker-Warburg congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
75553
Concept ID:
C0265221
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SELENON (SEPN1)-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Kniest dysplasia
MedGen UID:
75559
Concept ID:
C0265279
Congenital Abnormality
Kniest dysplasia is a disorder of bone growth characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities and problems with vision and hearing.People with Kniest dysplasia are born with a short trunk and shortened arms and legs. Adult height ranges from 42 inches to 58 inches. Affected individuals have abnormally large joints that can cause pain and restrict movement, limiting physical activity. These joint problems can also lead to arthritis. Other skeletal features may include a rounded upper back that also curves to the side (kyphoscoliosis), severely flattened bones of the spine (platyspondyly), dumbbell-shaped bones in the arms and legs, long and knobby fingers, and an inward- and upward-turning foot (clubfoot).Individuals with Kniest dysplasia have a round, flat face with bulging and wide-set eyes. Some affected infants are born with an opening in the roof of the mouth called a cleft palate. Infants may also have breathing problems due to weakness of the windpipe. Severe nearsightedness (myopia) and other eye problems are common in Kniest dysplasia. Some eye problems, such as tearing of the back lining of the eye (retinal detachment), can lead to blindness. Hearing loss resulting from recurrent ear infections is also possible.
Moore-Federman syndrome
MedGen UID:
82709
Concept ID:
C0265349
Congenital Abnormality
Pallister-Killian syndrome
MedGen UID:
120540
Concept ID:
C0265449
Disease or Syndrome
Pallister-Killian syndrome is a dysmorphic condition involving most organ systems, but also characterized by a tissue-limited mosaicism; most fibroblasts have 47 chromosomes with an extra small metacentric chromosome, whereas the karyotype of lymphocytes is normal. The extra metacentric chromosome is an isochromosome for part of the short arm of chromosome 12: i(12)(p10) (Peltomaki et al., 1987; Warburton et al., 1987).
Atrophia bulborum hereditaria
MedGen UID:
75615
Concept ID:
C0266526
Congenital Abnormality
NDP-related retinopathies are characterized by a spectrum of fibrous and vascular changes of the retina at birth that progress through childhood or adolescence to cause varying degrees of visual impairment. The most severe phenotype is described as Norrie disease (ND), characterized by greyish yellow fibrovascular masses (pseudogliomas) secondary to retinal vascular dysgenesis and detachment. Congenital blindness is almost always present. Approximately 30%-50% of males with ND have developmental delay/intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, or psychotic-like features. The majority of males with ND develop sensorineural hearing loss. Less severe phenotypes include: persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), characterized by a fibrotic white stalk from the optic disk to the lens; X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR), characterized by peripheral retinal vascular anomalies with or without fibrotic changes and retinal detachment; retinopathy of prematurity (ROP); and Coats disease, an exudative proliferative vasculopathy. Phenotypes can vary within families.
Deficiency of UDPglucose-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
MedGen UID:
82777
Concept ID:
C0268151
Disease or Syndrome
The term galactosemia refers to disorders of galactose metabolism that include classic galactosemia, clinical variant galactosemia, and biochemical variant galactosemia. This GeneReview focuses on: Classic galactosemia, which can result in life-threatening complications including feeding problems, failure to thrive, hepatocellular damage, bleeding, and E. coli sepsis in untreated infants. If a lactose-restricted diet is provided during the first ten days of life, the neonatal signs usually quickly resolve and the complications of liver failure, sepsis, and neonatal death are prevented; however, despite adequate treatment from an early age, children with classic galactosemia remain at increased risk for developmental delays, speech problems (termed childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria), and abnormalities of motor function. Almost all females with classic galactosemia manifest premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Clinical variant galactosemia, which can result in life-threatening complications including feeding problems, failure to thrive, hepatocellular damage including cirrhosis and bleeding in untreated infants. This is exemplified by the disease that occurs in African Americans and native Africans in South Africa. Persons with clinical variant galactosemia may be missed with newborn screening (NBS) as the hypergalactosemia is not as marked as in classic galactosemia and breath testing is normal. If a lactose-restricted diet is provided during the first ten days of life, the severe acute neonatal complications are usually prevented. African Americans with clinical variant galactosemia and adequate early treatment do not appear to be at risk for long-term complications including POI.
Deficiency of galactokinase
MedGen UID:
120614
Concept ID:
C0268155
Disease or Syndrome
Galactokinase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes cataract formation in children not maintained on a lactose-free diet. Cataract formation is the result of osmotic phenomena caused by the accumulation of galactitol in the lens (Asada et al., 1999).
Aspartylglucosaminuria
MedGen UID:
78649
Concept ID:
C0268225
Disease or Syndrome
Aspartylglucosaminuria is a severe autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that involves the central nervous system and causes skeletal abnormalities as well as connective tissue lesions. The most characteristic feature is progressive mental retardation. The disorder is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glycosylasparaginase, which results in body fluid and tissue accumulation of a series of glycoasparagines, i.e., glycoconjugates with an aspartylglucosamine moiety at the reducing end. AGU belongs to the group of disorders commonly referred to as the Finnish disease heritage (summary by Mononen et al., 1993 and Arvio and Arvio, 2002).
Sialidosis, type II
MedGen UID:
120621
Concept ID:
C0268226
Disease or Syndrome
Sialidosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive lysosomal storage of sialylated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides caused by a deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase. Common to the sialidoses is the accumulation and/or excretion of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) covalently linked ('bound') to a variety of oligosaccharides and/or glycoproteins (summary by Lowden and O'Brien, 1979). The sialidoses are distinct from the sialurias in which there is storage and excretion of 'free' sialic acid, rather than 'bound' sialic acid; neuraminidase activity in sialuria is normal or elevated. Salla disease (604369) is a form of 'free' sialic acid disease. Classification Lowden and O'Brien (1979) provided a logical nosology of neuraminidase deficiency into sialidosis type I and type II. Type I is the milder form, also known as the 'normosomatic' type or the cherry red spot-myoclonus syndrome. Sialidosis type II is the more severe form with an earlier onset, and is also known as the 'dysmorphic' type. Type II has been subdivided into juvenile and infantile forms. Other terms for sialidosis type II are mucolipidosis I and lipomucopolysaccharidosis.
Cutis laxa-corneal clouding-oligophrenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
82794
Concept ID:
C0268354
Disease or Syndrome
De Barsy syndrome, or autosomal recessive cutis laxa type III (ARCL3), is characterized by cutis laxa, a progeria-like appearance, and ophthalmologic abnormalities (summary by Kivuva et al., 2008). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive cutis laxa, see 219100. Genetic Heterogeneity of de Barsy Syndrome Also see ARCL3B (614438), caused by mutation in the PYCR1 gene (179035) on chromosome 17q25.
Chondrodysplasia punctata 2 X-linked dominant
MedGen UID:
79381
Concept ID:
C0282102
Disease or Syndrome
The findings in X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2) range from fetal demise with multiple malformations and severe growth retardation to much milder manifestations, including adults with no recognizable physical abnormalities. At least 95% of liveborn individuals with CDPX2 are female with the following findings: Growth deficiency/short stature. Distinctive craniofacial appearance. Skeletal changes: stippling (chondrodysplasia punctate) on x-rays of the epiphyses of the long bones and vertebrae, the trachea and distal ends of the ribs seen in children prior to completion of normal epiphyseal ossification; rhizomelic (i.e., proximal) shortening of limbs that is often asymmetric; scoliosis. Ectodermal changes: linear or blotchy scaling ichthyosis in the newborn that usually resolves in the first months of life leaving linear or whorled atrophic patches involving hair follicles (follicular atrophoderma); coarse hair with scarring alopecia; occasional flattened or split nails; normal teeth. Ocular changes: cataracts; microphthalmia and/or microcornea. Intellect is usually normal. Rarely affected males have been identified with a phenotype that includes: hypotonia; moderate to profound developmental delay; seizures; cerebellar (primarily vermis) hypoplasia and/or Dandy-Walker variant; and agenesis of the corpus callosum.
Cronkhite-Canada syndrome
MedGen UID:
129128
Concept ID:
C0282207
Disease or Syndrome
Cronkhite-Canada syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis, alopecia, onychodystrophy, skin hyperpigmentation, and diarrhea. It is associated with high morbidity (summary by Sweetser et al., 2012).
Flynn-Aird syndrome
MedGen UID:
91009
Concept ID:
C0343108
Disease or Syndrome
Megalocornea
MedGen UID:
138008
Concept ID:
C0344530
Congenital Abnormality
Megalocornea is an inherited eye disorder in which the corneal diameter is bilaterally enlarged (greater than 13 mm) without an increase in intraocular pressure. It may also be referred to as 'anterior megalophthalmos,' since the entire anterior segment is larger than normal. Features of megalocornea in addition to a deep anterior chamber include astigmatic refractive errors, atrophy of the iris stroma, miosis secondary to decreased function of the dilator muscle, iridodonesis, and tremulousness, subluxation, or dislocation of the lens. Whereas most affected individuals exhibit normal ocular function, complications include cataract development and glaucoma following lenticular dislocation or subluxation. X-linked recessive inheritance is the most common pattern, accounting for the male preponderance of the disorder (summary by Skuta et al., 1983). Megalocornea sometimes occurs as part of the Marfan syndrome (154700). Genetic Heterogeneity of Megalocornea Autosomal recessive megalocornea has been reported (249300).
Aniridia 1
MedGen UID:
576337
Concept ID:
C0344542
Congenital Abnormality
Aniridia is characterized by complete or partial iris hypoplasia usually (but not always) with associated foveal hypoplasia resulting in reduced visual acuity and nystagmus presenting in early infancy. Frequently associated ocular abnormalities (often of later onset) include cataract, glaucoma, and corneal opacification and vascularization. Aniridia may occur either as an isolated ocular abnormality without systemic involvement, caused by mutation of PAX6 or deletion of a regulatory region controlling its expression, or as part of the Wilms tumor-aniridia-genital anomalies-retardation (WAGR) syndrome, with a deletion of 11p13 involving the PAX6 (aniridia) locus and the adjacent WT1 (Wilms tumor) locus. Individuals with deletion of PAX6 and WT1 are at up to a 50% risk of developing Wilms tumor.
Branchiooculofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
91261
Concept ID:
C0376524
Disease or Syndrome
The branchiooculofacial syndrome (BOFS) is characterized by: branchial (cervical or infra- or supra-auricular) skin defects that range from barely perceptible thin skin or hair patch to erythematous "hemangiomatous" lesions to large weeping erosions; ocular anomalies that can include microphthalmia, anophthalmia, coloboma, and nasolacrimal duct stenosis/atresia; and facial anomalies that can include ocular hypertelorism or telecanthus, broad nasal tip, upslanted palpebral fissures, cleft lip or prominent philtral pillars that give the appearance of a repaired cleft lip (formerly called "pseudocleft lip") with or without cleft palate, upper lip pits, and lower facial weakness (asymmetric crying face or partial 7th cranial nerve weakness). Malformed and prominent pinnae and hearing loss from inner ear and/or petrous bone anomalies are common. Intellect is usually normal.
Lhermitte-Duclos disease
MedGen UID:
140251
Concept ID:
C0391826
Neoplastic Process
A benign, WHO grade I cerebellar mass, which occurs in young adults and is composed of dysplastic ganglion cells. It is the major CNS manifestation of Cowden disease, an autosomal dominant condition that causes a variety of hamartomas and neoplasms.(from WHO)
Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
95931
Concept ID:
C0392475
Disease or Syndrome
Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by prenatal growth retardation (ranging from mild to severe), craniofacial findings (including microcephaly and cleft lip and/or palate) and limb malformations (including bilateral symmetric tetraphocomelia or hypomelia caused by mesomelic shortening). Upper limbs are more severely affected than lower limbs. Other limb malformations include oligodactyly with thumb aplasia or hypoplasia, syndactyly, clinodactyly, and elbow and knee flexion contractures. Craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and/or cleft palate, premaxillary prominence, micrognathia, microbrachycephaly, malar flattening, downslanted palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, exophthalmos resulting from shallow orbits, corneal clouding, underdeveloped ala nasi, beaked nose, and ear malformations. Intellectual disability is reported in the majority of affected individuals. Mortality is high among severely affected pregnancies and newborns. Mildly affected individuals may survive to adulthood.
Dysequilibrium syndrome
MedGen UID:
98295
Concept ID:
C0394006
Disease or Syndrome
VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia is an inherited condition that affects the development of the brain. People with this condition have an unusually small and underdeveloped cerebellum, which is the part of the brain that coordinates movement. This brain malformation leads to problems with balance and coordination (ataxia) that become apparent in infancy and remain stable over time. Children with VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia may learn to walk later in childhood, usually after the age of 6, although some are never able to walk independently. In one Turkish family, affected people walk on their hands and feet (quadrupedal locomotion).Additional features of VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia include moderate to profound intellectual disability, impaired speech (dysarthria) or a lack of speech, and eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus). Some affected individuals have also had flat feet (pes planus), seizures, and short stature. Studies suggest that VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia does not significantly affect a person's life expectancy.
Epstein syndrome
MedGen UID:
97986
Concept ID:
C0398641
Disease or Syndrome
MYH9-related disorders (MYH9RD) are characterized by large platelets (i.e., >40% of platelets >3.9 µm in diameter) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 109/L), both of which are present from birth. MYH9RD is variably associated with young-adult onset of progressive sensorineural hearing loss, presenile cataract, elevation of liver enzymes, and renal disease manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy. Before identification of the gene in which mutation is causative, MYH9, individuals with MYH9RD were diagnosed as having Epstein syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, May-Hegglin anomaly, or Sebastian syndrome based on the combination of different clinical findings at the time of diagnosis. However, the realization that they all are due to heterozygous pathogenic variants in MYH9 and that the clinical findings often worsen throughout life as a result of late onset of non-hematologic manifestations has led the four conditions to be regarded as one disorder, now known as MYH9RD.
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
140820
Concept ID:
C0410174
Disease or Syndrome
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is characterized by hypotonia, symmetric generalized muscle weakness, and CNS migration disturbances that result in changes consistent with cobblestone (previously type II) lissencephaly with cerebral and cerebellar cortical dysplasia. Mild, typical, and severe phenotypes are recognized. Onset typically occurs in early infancy, with a poor suck, weak cry, and floppiness. Affected individuals have contractures of the hips, knees, and interphalangeal joints. Later features include myopathic facial appearance, pseudohypertrophy of the calves and forearms, motor and speech retardation, intellectual disability, seizures, ophthalmologic abnormalities including visual impairment and retinal dysplasia, and progressive cardiac involvement in individuals older than age ten years. Swallowing disturbance occurs in individuals with severe FCMD and in individuals older than age ten years, leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia and death.
Osteoporosis with pseudoglioma
MedGen UID:
98480
Concept ID:
C0432252
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome is a rare condition characterized by severe thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) and eye abnormalities that lead to vision loss. In people with this condition, osteoporosis is usually recognized in early childhood. It is caused by a shortage of minerals, such as calcium, in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone to fracture. Affected individuals often have multiple bone fractures, including in the bones that form the spine (vertebrae). Multiple fractures can cause collapse of the affected vertebrae (compressed vertebrae), abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), short stature, and limb deformities. Decreased bone mineral density can also cause softening or thinning of the skull (craniotabes).Most affected individuals have impaired vision at birth or by early infancy and are blind by young adulthood. Vision problems are usually caused by one of several eye conditions, grouped together as pseudoglioma, that affect the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), although other eye conditions have been identified in affected individuals. Pseudogliomas are so named because, on examination, the conditions resemble an eye tumor known as a retinal glioma.Rarely, people with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome have additional signs or symptoms such as mild intellectual disability, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), abnormally flexible joints, or seizures.
Muscle eye brain disease
MedGen UID:
105341
Concept ID:
C0457133
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SELENON (SEPN1)-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Cockayne syndrome B
MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications.
Cockayne syndrome type A
MedGen UID:
155488
Concept ID:
C0751039
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications.
Fine-Lubinsky syndrome
MedGen UID:
163198
Concept ID:
C0795941
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with characteristics of psychomotor delay, brachycephaly with flat face, small nose, microstomia, cleft palate, cataract, hearing loss, hypoplastic scrotum and digital anomalies. Less than 10 patients have been described in the literature so far. Although the majority of reported cases were sporadic, the syndrome has been reported in one pair of siblings (a brother and sister) with an apparently autosomal recessive inheritance pattern.
Galloway-Mowat syndrome
MedGen UID:
167086
Concept ID:
C0795949
Disease or Syndrome
Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by infantile onset of microcephaly and central nervous system abnormalities resulting in severely delayed psychomotor development. Brain imaging shows cerebellar atrophy and sometimes cerebral atrophy. More variable features include optic atrophy, movement disorders, seizures, and nephrotic syndrome (summary by Vodopiutz et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Galloway-Mowat Syndrome GAMOS2 (301006) is caused by mutation in the LAGE3 gene (300060) on chromosome Xq28; GAMOS3 (617729) is caused by mutation in the OSGEP gene (610107) on chromosome 14q11; GAMOS4 (617730) is caused by mutation in the TP53RK gene (608679) on chromosome 20q13; and GAMOS5 (617731) is caused by mutation in the TPRKB gene (608680) on chromosome 2p13.
Kapur Toriello syndrome
MedGen UID:
208654
Concept ID:
C0796005
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare syndrome with characteristics of facial dysmorphism, severe intellectual deficiency, cardiac and intestinal anomalies, and growth retardation. Only four cases have been reported in the literature, in three unrelated families. Dysmorphic features include bilateral cleft lip and palate, bulbous nasal tip and eye anomalies. The condition seems to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.
Peters plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
163204
Concept ID:
C0796012
Disease or Syndrome
Peters plus syndrome is characterized by anterior chamber eye anomalies, short limbs with broad distal extremities, characteristic facial features, cleft lip/palate, and variable developmental delay/intellectual disability. The most common anterior chamber defect is Peters' anomaly, consisting of central corneal clouding, thinning of the posterior cornea, and iridocorneal adhesions. Cataracts and glaucoma are common. Developmental delay is observed in about 80% of children; intellectual disability can range from mild to severe.
Zimmermann-Laband syndrome
MedGen UID:
208656
Concept ID:
C0796013
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of gingival fibromatosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and anomalies of the nose, bones, and nails, occasionally associated with mental retardation.
Martsolf syndrome
MedGen UID:
208658
Concept ID:
C0796037
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Linear skin defects with multiple congenital anomalies 1
MedGen UID:
163210
Concept ID:
C0796070
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microophthalmia and/or anophthalmia and linear skin defects, usually involving the face and neck, which are present at birth and heal with age, leaving minimal residual scarring. Other findings can include central nervous system involvement (e.g., structural anomalies, infantile seizures), developmental delay, heart defects (e.g., hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, oncocytic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias), short stature, diaphragmatic hernia, nail dystrophy, preauricular pits and hearing loss, and genitourinary malformations. Inter- and intrafamilial variability is considerable.
Retinopathy pigmentary mental retardation
MedGen UID:
167101
Concept ID:
C0796072
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, retinal pigmentary degeneration, spastic cerebral palsy, and microcephaly with variable expressivity. Mirhosseini-Holmes-Walton and Cohen syndromes share many common characteristics.
Renpenning syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
208670
Concept ID:
C0796135
Disease or Syndrome
Renpenning syndrome is an X-linked mental retardation syndrome with clinically recognizable features. Affected individuals have microcephaly, short stature, small testes, and dysmorphic facies, including tall narrow face, upslanting palpebral fissures, abnormal nasal configuration, cupped ears, and short philtrum. The nose may appear long or bulbous, with overhanging columella. Less consistent manifestations include ocular colobomas, cardiac malformations, cleft palate, and anal anomalies. Stevenson et al. (2005) proposed that the various X-linked mental retardation syndromes due to PQBP1 mutations be combined under the name of Renpenning syndrome.
Oculodentodigital dysplasia
MedGen UID:
167236
Concept ID:
C0812437
Congenital Abnormality
Oculodentodigital syndrome is characterized by a typical facial appearance and variable involvement of the eyes, dentition, and fingers. Characteristic facial features include a narrow, pinched nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, prominent columella and thin anteverted nares together with a narrow nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds giving the impression of hypertelorism. The teeth are usually small and carious. Typical eye findings include microphthalmia and microcornea. The characteristic digital malformation is complete syndactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers (syndactyly type III) but the third finger may be involved and associated camptodactyly is a common finding (summary by Judisch et al., 1979). Neurologic abnormalities are sometimes associated (Gutmann et al., 1991), and lymphedema has been reported in some patients with ODDD (Brice et al., 2013). See review by De Bock et al. (2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculodentodigital Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of ODDD (257850) is also caused by mutation in the GJA1 gene, but the majority of cases are autosomal dominant.
Trichomegaly
MedGen UID:
163139
Concept ID:
C0854699
Finding
SHORT syndrome
MedGen UID:
164212
Concept ID:
C0878684
Disease or Syndrome
SHORT syndrome is a mnemonic for short stature, hyperextensibility, ocular depression (deeply set eyes), Rieger anomaly, and teething delay. It is now recognized that the features most consistently observed in SHORT syndrome are mild intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); mild short stature; partial lipodystrophy (evident at birth in the face, and later in the chest and upper extremities, often sparing the buttocks and legs); and a characteristic facial gestalt. Other frequent features include: Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly or related ocular anterior chamber dysgenesis; delayed dentition and a variety of dental abnormalities; insulin resistance (typically in mid-childhood to adolescence) and/or diabetes mellitus in early adulthood; and sensorineural hearing loss. To date the diagnosis has been molecularly confirmed in individuals from 16 families; thus, the current understanding of the phenotypic spectrum and natural history are likely to evolve over time.
Dyskeratosis congenita X-linked
MedGen UID:
216941
Concept ID:
C1148551
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a telomere biology disorder, is characterized by a classic triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia. The classic triad may not be present in all individuals. People with DC are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include: abnormal pigmentation changes not restricted to the upper chest and neck, eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), and dental abnormalities (caries, periodontal disease, taurodauntism). Although most persons with DC have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in the two variants in which additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Progeroid short stature with pigmented nevi
MedGen UID:
224702
Concept ID:
C1261128
Disease or Syndrome
Mulvihill-Smith syndrome is characterized by premature aging, multiple pigmented nevi, lack of facial subcutaneous fat, microcephaly, short stature, sensorineural hearing loss, and mental retardation. Immunodeficiency may also be a feature. Adult manifestations include the development of tumors, a sleep disorder with severe insomnia, and cognitive decline (summary by Yagihashi et al., 2009).
Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia
MedGen UID:
220887
Concept ID:
C1274795
Congenital Abnormality
Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by onset in infancy of a panepithelial defect involving the oral, nasal, conjunctival, vaginal, cervical, perineal, urethral, and bladder mucosa. Patients develop cataracts, blindness, nonscarring alopecia, perineal psoriasiform lesions, and follicular keratoses (Witkop et al., 1982). Although 1 family was reported to have progressive severe interstitial lung disease (Witkop et al., 1979), this feature has not been reported in other families and is not considered a criterion for diagnosis (review by Boralevi et al., 2005).
Chondrodysplasia punctata, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
303176
Concept ID:
C1442935
Disease or Syndrome
Alport syndrome, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
292689
Concept ID:
C1567744
Disease or Syndrome
Alport syndrome (AS) is characterized by renal, cochlear, and ocular involvement. In the absence of treatment, renal disease progresses from microscopic hematuria to proteinuria, progressive renal insufficiency, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in all males with X-linked (XL) AS, and in all males and females with autosomal recessive (AR) AS. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is usually present by late childhood or early adolescence. Ocular findings include anterior lenticonus (which is virtually pathognomonic), maculopathy (whitish or yellowish flecks or granulations in the perimacular region), corneal endothelial vesicles (posterior polymorphous dystrophy), and recurrent corneal erosion. In individuals with autosomal dominant (AD) AS, ESRD is frequently delayed until later adulthood, SNHL is also relatively late in onset and ocular involvement is rare. Thin basement membrane nephropathy (TBMN) is characterized by persistent microscopic hematuria often first observed in childhood; progressive renal disease is relatively unusual and extrarenal abnormalities are rare.
Duane-radial ray syndrome
MedGen UID:
301647
Concept ID:
C1623209
Disease or Syndrome
SALL4-related disorders include Duane-radial ray syndrome (DRRS, Okihiro syndrome), acro-renal-ocular syndrome (AROS), and SALL4-related Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS), three phenotypes previously thought to be distinct entities: DRRS is characterized by uni- or bilateral Duane anomaly and radial ray malformation that can include thenar hypoplasia and/or hypoplasia or aplasia of the thumbs, hypoplasia or aplasia of the radii, shortening and radial deviation of the forearms, triphalangeal thumbs, and duplication of the thumb (preaxial polydactyly). AROS is characterized by radial ray malformations, renal abnormalities (mild malrotation, ectopia, horseshoe kidney, renal hypoplasia, vesico-ureteral reflux, bladder diverticula), ocular coloboma, and Duane anomaly. Rarely, pathogenic variants in SALL4 may cause clinically typical HOS (i.e., radial ray malformations and cardiac malformations without additional features).
Groenouw corneal dystrophy type I
MedGen UID:
351521
Concept ID:
C1641846
Disease or Syndrome
Ectopia lentis et pupillae
MedGen UID:
301316
Concept ID:
C1644196
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ADAMTSL4-related eye disorders is a continuum that includes the phenotypes known as “autosomal recessive isolated ectopia lentis” and “ectopia lentis et pupillae” as well as more minor eye anomalies with no displacement of the pupil and very mild displacement of the lens; no systemic abnormalities are observed. Typical eye findings are dislocation of the lens, congenital abnormalities of the iris, refractive errors that may lead to amblyopia, and early-onset cataract. Increased intraocular pressure and retinal detachment may occur on occasion. Eye findings can vary within a family and between the eyes in an individual.
Chorea, remitting with nystagmus and cataracts
MedGen UID:
330463
Concept ID:
C1832422
Disease or Syndrome
Hypoparathyroidism familial isolated
MedGen UID:
322005
Concept ID:
C1832648
Disease or Syndrome
Garfield and Karaplis (2001) reviewed the various causes and clinical forms of hypoparathyroidism. They noted that hypoparathyroidism is a clinical disorder characterized by hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. It manifests when parathyroid hormone (PTH; 168450) secreted from the parathyroid glands is insufficient to maintain normal extracellular fluid calcium concentrations or, less commonly, when PTH is unable to function optimally in target tissues, despite adequate circulating levels. Congenital absence of the parathyroid and thymus glands (III and IV pharyngeal pouch syndrome, or DiGeorge syndrome, 188400) is usually a sporadic condition (Taitz et al., 1966).
Spastic paraplegia 9
MedGen UID:
322007
Concept ID:
C1832669
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia-9A is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive spasticity mainly affecting the lower limbs. The age at onset usually ranges from adolescence to adulthood, and patients have gait difficulties, motor neuropathy, and dysarthria. Additional variable features include cerebellar signs, cataract, pes cavus, and urinary urgency (summary by Coutelier et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600).
Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, neonatal form
MedGen UID:
318896
Concept ID:
C1833518
Disease or Syndrome
The neonatal form of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency (see this term), an inherited disorder that affects mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA), is the lethal form of the disease which presents with multisystem failure.
Optic atrophy and cataract, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
371657
Concept ID:
C1833809
Disease or Syndrome
A form of autosomal dominant optic atrophy with characteristics of early and bilateral optic atrophy leading to insidious visual loss of variable severity, followed by a late anterior and/or posterior cortical cataract. Additional features include sensorineural hearing loss and neurological signs such as tremor, extrapyramidal rigidity and absence of deep tendon reflexes. Caused by mutations in the OPA3 gene (19q13.32).
Cerebelloparenchymal Disorder VI
MedGen UID:
331813
Concept ID:
C1834711
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar Granule Cell Hypertrophy and Megalencephaly
MedGen UID:
371886
Concept ID:
C1834712
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Cataract, congenital, with microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
320475
Concept ID:
C1834919
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Cataract 35
MedGen UID:
373050
Concept ID:
C1836272
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1G
MedGen UID:
322993
Concept ID:
C1836765
Disease or Syndrome
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1G is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs. Onset is usually in adulthood, but can occur during the teenage years. Affected individuals may also develop cataracts before age 50 (summary by Vieira et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMD1A (159000).
Stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis with neurologic defects
MedGen UID:
332390
Concept ID:
C1837206
Disease or Syndrome
Stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis with neurologic defects is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, seizures, cataracts, and pseudohyperkalemia resulting from defects in the red blood cell membrane. The disorder combines the neurologic features of Glut1 deficiency syndrome-1 (GLUT1DS1; 606777), resulting from impaired glucose transport at the blood-brain barrier, and hemolytic anemia/pseudohyperkalemia with stomatocytosis, resulting from a cation leak in erythrocytes (summary by Bawazir et al., 2012). For a discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of red cell stomatocyte disorders, see 194380.
Alpha-B crystallinopathy
MedGen UID:
324735
Concept ID:
C1837317
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Beasley Cohen type
MedGen UID:
332459
Concept ID:
C1837462
Disease or Syndrome
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective tissues supporting the skin, bones, blood vessels, and many other organs and tissues. Defects in connective tissues cause the signs and symptoms of these conditions, which range from mildly loose joints to life-threatening complications.The various forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been classified in several different ways. Originally, 11 forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome were named using Roman numerals to indicate the types (type I, type II, and so on). In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification (the Villefranche nomenclature) that reduced the number of types to six and gave them descriptive names based on their major features. In 2017, the classification was updated to include rare forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome that were discovered more recently. The 2017 classification describes 13 types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.An unusually large range of joint movement (hypermobility) occurs in most forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and it is a hallmark feature of the hypermobile type. Infants and children with hypermobility often have weak muscle tone (hypotonia), which can delay the development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. The loose joints are unstable and prone to dislocation and chronic pain. In the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, infants have hypermobility and dislocations of both hips at birth.Many people with the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes have soft, velvety skin that is highly stretchy (elastic) and fragile. Affected individuals tend to bruise easily, and some types of the condition also cause abnormal scarring. People with the classical form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience wounds that split open with little bleeding and leave scars that widen over time to create characteristic "cigarette paper" scars. The dermatosparaxis type of the disorder is characterized by loose skin that sags and wrinkles, and extra (redundant) folds of skin may be present.Some forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, notably the vascular type and to a lesser extent the kyphoscoliotic, classical, and classical-like types, can cause unpredictable tearing (rupture) of blood vessels, leading to internal bleeding and other potentially life-threatening complications. The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of organ rupture, including tearing of the intestine and rupture of the uterus during pregnancy.Other types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have additional signs and symptoms. The cardiac-valvular type causes severe problems with the valves that control the movement of blood through the heart. People with the kyphoscoliotic type experience severe curvature of the spine that worsens over time and can interfere with breathing by restricting lung expansion. A type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome called brittle cornea syndrome is characterized by thinness of the clear covering of the eye (the cornea) and other eye abnormalities. The spondylodysplastic type features short stature and skeletal abnormalities such as abnormally curved (bowed) limbs. Abnormalities of muscles, including hypotonia and permanently bent joints (contractures), are among the characteristic signs of the musculocontractural and myopathic forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The periodontal type causes abnormalities of the teeth and gums.
Zonular cataract and nystagmus
MedGen UID:
326397
Concept ID:
C1839080
Disease or Syndrome
Leiomyomatosis, esophageal and vulval, with nephropathy
MedGen UID:
333429
Concept ID:
C1839884
Disease or Syndrome
Iris pigment layer, cleavage of
MedGen UID:
326664
Concept ID:
C1840140
Finding
Craniosynostosis with ocular abnormalities and hallucal defects
MedGen UID:
331266
Concept ID:
C1842316
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacial abnormalities, cataracts, congenital heart disease, sacral neural tube defects, and growth and developmental retardation
MedGen UID:
330832
Concept ID:
C1842363
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1I
MedGen UID:
334618
Concept ID:
C1842836
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
1p36 deletion syndrome is characterized by typical craniofacial features consisting of straight eyebrows, deeply set eyes, midface retrusion, wide and depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, pointed chin, large, late-closing anterior fontanel (77%), microbrachycephaly (65%), epicanthal folds (50%), and posteriorly rotated, low-set, abnormal ears. Other characteristic findings include brachy/camptodactyly and short feet. Developmental delay/intellectual disability of variable degree are present in all, and hypotonia in 95%. Seizures occur in 44%-58% of affected individuals. Other findings include structural brain abnormalities (88%), congenital heart defects (71%), eye/vision problems (52%), hearing loss (47%), skeletal anomalies (41%), abnormalities of the external genitalia (25%), and renal abnormalities (22%).
Chondrodysplasia punctata 1, X-linked recessive
MedGen UID:
337102
Concept ID:
C1844853
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 (CDPX1), a congenital disorder of bone and cartilage development, is caused by a deficiency of the Golgi enzyme arylsulfatase E (ARSE). It is characterized by chondrodysplasia punctata (stippled epiphyses), brachytelephalangy (shortening of the distal phalanges), and nasomaxillary hypoplasia. Although most affected males have minimal morbidity and skeletal findings that improve by adulthood, some have significant medical problems including respiratory compromise, cervical spine stenosis and instability, mixed conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, and intellectual disability.
Juvenile-onset dystonia
MedGen UID:
339494
Concept ID:
C1846331
Disease or Syndrome
Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial (BWCFF) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by typical craniofacial features and intellectual disability (ID) that ranges from mild (usually in those with normal brain structure) to profound (typically in those with a neuronal migration defect). Many (but not all) affected individuals have iris or retinal coloboma, sensorineural deafness, and muscle wasting resulting in a peculiar stance with kyphosis, anteverted shoulders, and slightly flexed elbows and knees. Seizures, congenital heart defects, and renal malformations also are common.
Thumb, hypoplastic, with choroid coloboma, poorly developed antihelix, and deafness
MedGen UID:
376448
Concept ID:
C1848816
Disease or Syndrome
Thanatophoric dysplasia Glasgow variant
MedGen UID:
376457
Concept ID:
C1848865
Disease or Syndrome
Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
341339
Concept ID:
C1848934
Disease or Syndrome
The FLNB-related disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild (spondylocarpotarsal synostosis [SCT] syndrome and Larsen syndrome) to severe (atelosteogenesis types I [AOI] and III [AOIII], boomerang dysplasia). SCT syndrome is characterized by disproportionate short stature, block vertebrae, scoliosis and lordosis, carpal and tarsal fusion, club feet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, and mild facial dysmorphisms. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; club feet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; and distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, and widely spaced eyes). Both can have midline cleft palate and conductive hearing loss. AOIII and AOI are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and club feet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period.
Enhanced s-cone syndrome
MedGen UID:
341446
Concept ID:
C1849394
Disease or Syndrome
Polycystic kidney, cataract, and congenital blindness
MedGen UID:
337910
Concept ID:
C1849771
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia 3
MedGen UID:
340413
Concept ID:
C1849792
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The symptoms are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Pellagra like syndrome
MedGen UID:
337955
Concept ID:
C1850052
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome
MedGen UID:
338026
Concept ID:
C1850343
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy (MVA) syndrome is a rare disorder in which some cells in the body have an abnormal number of chromosomes instead of the usual 46 chromosomes, a situation known as aneuploidy. Most commonly, cells have an extra chromosome, which is called trisomy, or are missing a chromosome, which is known as monosomy. In MVA syndrome, some cells are aneuploid and others have the normal number of chromosomes, which is a phenomenon known as mosaicism. Typically, at least one-quarter of cells in affected individuals have an abnormal number of chromosomes. Because the additional or missing chromosomes vary among the abnormal cells, the aneuploidy is described as variegated.In MVA syndrome, growth before birth is slow (intrauterine growth restriction). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate and are shorter than average. In addition, they typically have an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Another common feature of MVA syndrome is an increased risk of developing cancer in childhood. Cancers that occur most frequently in affected individuals include a cancer of muscle tissue called rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of kidney cancer known as Wilms tumor, and a cancer of the blood-forming tissue known as leukemia.Less commonly, people with MVA syndrome have eye abnormalities or distinctive facial features, such as a broad nasal bridge and low-set ears. Some affected individuals have brain abnormalities, the most common of which is called Dandy-Walker malformation. Intellectual disability, seizures, and other health problems can also occur in people with MVA syndrome.There are at least three types of MVA syndrome, each with a different genetic cause. Type 1 is the most common and displays the classic signs and symptoms described above. Type 2 appears to have slightly different signs and symptoms than type 1, although the small number of affected individuals makes it difficult to define its characteristic features. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 grow slowly before and after birth; however, their head size is typically normal. Some people with MVA syndrome type 2 have unusually short arms. Individuals with MVA syndrome type 2 do not seem to have an increased risk of cancer. Another form of MVA syndrome is characterized by a high risk of developing Wilms tumor. Individuals with this form may also have other signs and symptoms typical of MVA syndrome type 1.
Nathalie syndrome
MedGen UID:
338087
Concept ID:
C1850626
Disease or Syndrome
Nathalie syndrome has characteristics of deafness, cataract, muscular atrophy, skeletal abnormalities, growth retardation, underdeveloped secondary sexual characteristics and electrocardiographic abnormalities. It has been described in a Dutch family: in three sisters (one named Nathalie) and their brother.
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, infantile with cataract and hypogonadism
MedGen UID:
376896
Concept ID:
C1850864
Disease or Syndrome
Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, with myopia and conductive deafness
MedGen UID:
377049
Concept ID:
C1851536
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency
MedGen UID:
377658
Concept ID:
C1852372
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a severe multisystem disorder with onset at birth of lactic acidosis, hypotonia, hypoglycemia, failure to thrive, encephalopathy, and delayed psychomotor development. Visceral involvement, including hepatopathy and renal tubulopathy, may also occur. Many patients die in early childhood, but some may show longer survival (de Lonlay et al., 2001; De Meirleir et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Mitochondrial complex III deficiency can be caused by mutation in several different nuclear-encoded genes. See MC3DN2 (615157), caused by mutation in the TTC19 gene (613814) on chromosome 17p12; MC3DN3 (615158), caused by mutation in the UQCRB gene (191330) on chromosome 8q; MC3DN4 (615159), caused by mutation in the UQCRQ gene (612080) on chromosome 5q31; MC3DN5 (615160), caused by mutation in the UQCRC2 gene (191329) on chromosome 16p12; MC3DN6 (615453), caused by mutation in the CYC1 gene (123980) on chromosome 8q24; MC3DN7 (615824), caused by mutation in the UQCC2 gene (614461) on chromosome 6p21; MC3DN8 (615838), caused by mutation in the LYRM7 gene (615831) on chromosome 5q23; and MC3DN9 (616111), caused by mutation in the UQCC3 gene (616097) on chromosome 11q12. See also MTYCB (516020) for a discussion of a milder phenotype associated with isolated mitochondrial complex III deficiency and mutations in a mitochondrial-encoded gene.
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
342799
Concept ID:
C1853102
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital primary aphakia
MedGen UID:
339935
Concept ID:
C1853230
Congenital Abnormality
Anterior segment dysgeneses are a heterogeneous group of developmental disorders affecting the anterior segment of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, trabecular meshwork, and Schlemm canal. The clinical features of ASGD include iris hypoplasia, an enlarged or reduced corneal diameter, corneal vascularization and opacity, posterior embryotoxon, corectopia, polycoria, an abnormal iridocorneal angle, ectopia lentis, and anterior synechiae between the iris and posterior corneal surface (summary by Cheong et al., 2016). Anterior segment dysgenesis is sometimes divided into subtypes, including aniridia (see 106210), Axenfeld and Rieger anomalies, iridogoniodysgenesis, Peters anomaly, and posterior embryotoxon (Gould and John, 2002). Some patients with ASGD2 have been reported with a congenital primary aphakia subtype. Congenital primary aphakia is a rare developmental disorder characterized by absence of the lens, the development of which is normally induced during the fourth to fifth week of human embryogenesis. This original failure leads, in turn, to complete aplasia of the anterior segment of the eye, which is the diagnostic histologic criterion for CPAK. In contrast, in secondary aphakia, lens induction occurs and the lens vesicle develops to some degree, but is progressively resorbed perinatally, resulting in less severe ocular defects (summary by Valleix et al., 2006).
Hemochromatosis type 4
MedGen UID:
340044
Concept ID:
C1853733
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder that causes the body to absorb too much iron from the diet. The excess iron is stored in the body's tissues and organs, particularly the skin, heart, liver, pancreas, and joints. Because humans cannot increase the excretion of iron, excess iron can overload and eventually damage tissues and organs. For this reason, hereditary hemochromatosis is also called an iron overload disorder.Early symptoms of hereditary hemochromatosis are nonspecific and may include fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, and loss of sex drive. Later signs and symptoms can include arthritis, liver disease, diabetes, heart abnormalities, and skin discoloration. The appearance and progression of symptoms can be affected by environmental and lifestyle factors such as the amount of iron in the diet, alcohol use, and infections.Hereditary hemochromatosis is classified by type depending on the age of onset and other factors such as genetic cause and mode of inheritance. Type 1, the most common form of the disorder, and type 4 (also called ferroportin disease) begin in adulthood. Men with type 1 or type 4 hemochromatosis typically develop symptoms between the ages of 40 and 60, and women usually develop symptoms after menopause.Type 2 hemochromatosis is a juvenile-onset disorder. Iron accumulation begins early in life, and symptoms may appear in childhood. By age 20, decreased or absent secretion of sex hormones is evident. Females usually begin menstruation in a normal manner, but menses stop after a few years. Males may experience delayed puberty or symptoms related to a shortage of sex hormones. If the disorder is untreated, heart disease becomes evident by age 30.The onset of type 3 hemochromatosis is usually intermediate between types 1 and 2. Symptoms of type 3 hemochromatosis generally begin before age 30.
Leber congenital amaurosis 6
MedGen UID:
344245
Concept ID:
C1854260
Congenital Abnormality
Leber congenital amaurosis comprises a group of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies characterized by vision loss, nystagmus, and severe retinal dysfunction. Patients usually present at birth with profound vision loss and pendular nystagmus. Electroretinogram (ERG) responses are usually nonrecordable. Other clinical findings may include high hypermetropia, photodysphoria, oculodigital sign, keratoconus, cataracts, and a variable appearance to the fundus (summary by Chung and Traboulsi, 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCA, see 204000.
Microcephalic primordial dwarfism Toriello type
MedGen UID:
381556
Concept ID:
C1855089
Disease or Syndrome
Growth retardation with prenatal onset, cataracts, microcephaly, intellectual deficit, immune deficiency, delayed ossification and enamel hypoplasia. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Dahlberg Borer Newcomer syndrome
MedGen UID:
383693
Concept ID:
C1855477
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare ectodermal dysplasia syndrome, described in 2 adult brothers, characterised by the association of hypoparathyroidism, nephropathy, congenital lymphoedema, mitral valve prolapse and brachytelephalangy. Additional features include mild facial dysmorphism, hypertrichosis and nail abnormalities.
Lubinsky syndrome
MedGen UID:
344596
Concept ID:
C1855859
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and cataracts with onset during adolescence. It has been described in three brothers from a consanguineous family. An autosomal recessive mode of transmission appears likely.
Hypertrophic neuropathy and cataract
MedGen UID:
344602
Concept ID:
C1855885
Disease or Syndrome
Encephalopathy, axonal, with necrotizing myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and cataracts
MedGen UID:
341669
Concept ID:
C1856990
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2
MedGen UID:
341734
Concept ID:
C1857242
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by disproportionately short stature primarily affecting the proximal parts of the extremities, a typical facial appearance including a broad nasal bridge, epicanthus, high-arched palate, dysplastic external ears, and micrognathia, congenital contractures, characteristic ocular involvement, dwarfism, and severe mental retardation with spasticity. Biochemically, plasmalogen synthesis and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation are defective. Most patients die in the first decade of life. RCDP1 (215100) is the most frequent form of RCDP (summary by Wanders and Waterham, 2005). Whereas RCDP1 is a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD), RCDP2 is classified as a single peroxisome enzyme deficiency (Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, see 215100.
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
341740
Concept ID:
C1857299
Congenital Abnormality
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), also termed 'persistent fetal vasculature,' is a developmental malformation of the eye in which the primary vitreous fails to regress in utero, resulting in the presence of a retrolental fibrovascular membrane with persistence of the posterior portion of the tunica vasculosa lentis and hyaloid artery. This abnormality is usually unilateral and associated with microphthalmia, cataract, glaucoma, and congenital retinal nonattachment (see Haddad et al., 1978; Khaliq et al., 2001; Prasov et al., 2012). PHPV shares phenotypic overlap with Norrie disease (310600). Genetic Heterogeneity of Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous A dominant form of PHPV has been described (PHPVAD; 611308).
Yunis Varon syndrome
MedGen UID:
341818
Concept ID:
C1857663
Disease or Syndrome
Yunis-Varon syndrome is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal defects, including cleidocranial dysplasia and digital anomalies, and severe neurologic involvement with neuronal loss. Enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles are found in neurons, muscle, and cartilage. The disorder is usually lethal in infancy (summary by Campeau et al., 2013).
MORM syndrome
MedGen UID:
341851
Concept ID:
C1857802
Disease or Syndrome
Syndrome with the association of intellectual deficit, truncal obesity, retinal dystrophy and micropenis. It has been described in 14 individuals from a consanguineous family. It is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner. The causative locus has been mapped to chromosome region 9q34.
Stickler syndrome, type 2
MedGen UID:
347615
Concept ID:
C1858084
Disease or Syndrome
Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can include ocular findings of myopia, cataract, and retinal detachment; hearing loss that is both conductive and sensorineural; midfacial underdevelopment and cleft palate (either alone or as part of the Robin sequence); and mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and/or precocious arthritis. Variable phenotypic expression of Stickler syndrome occurs both within and among families; interfamilial variability is in part explained by locus and allelic heterogeneity.
Cataract, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
347693
Concept ID:
C1858679
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYAA gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as nuclear, zonular central nuclear, laminar, lamellar, anterior polar, posterior polar, cortical, embryonal, anterior subcapsular, fan-shaped, and total. Cataract associated with microcornea, sometimes called the cataract-microcornea syndrome, is also caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. The symbol CATC1 was formerly used for the autosomal recessive form of cataract caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 2a (zellweger)
MedGen UID:
347830
Concept ID:
C1859228
Disease or Syndrome
The peroxisome biogenesis disorder (PBD) Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 2 (CG2) have mutations in the PEX5 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Cataract, microphthalmia and nystagmus
MedGen UID:
349139
Concept ID:
C1859311
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Cataract-microcephaly-failure to thrive-kyphoscoliosis
MedGen UID:
347121
Concept ID:
C1859312
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract and congenital ichthyosis
MedGen UID:
347122
Concept ID:
C1859315
Disease or Syndrome
Brachymetapody-anodontia-hypotrichosis-albinoidism
MedGen UID:
347867
Concept ID:
C1859385
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of congenital anodontia, a small maxilla, short stature with shortened metacarpals and metatarsals, sparse hair, albinoidism and multiple ocular anomalies. It has been described in three siblings (one brother and two sisters). Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Leber congenital amaurosis 2
MedGen UID:
348473
Concept ID:
C1859844
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis comprises a group of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies characterized by vision loss, nystagmus, and severe retinal dysfunction. Patients usually present at birth with profound vision loss and pendular nystagmus. Electroretinogram (ERG) responses are usually nonrecordable. Other clinical findings may include high hypermetropia, photodysphoria, oculodigital sign, keratoconus, cataracts, and a variable appearance to the fundus (summary by Chung and Traboulsi, 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCA, see 204000.
Snowflake vitreoretinal degeneration
MedGen UID:
395476
Concept ID:
C1860405
Disease or Syndrome
The appearance of yellow/white crystalline-like (hence the name) spots in the retina and thickening of the peripheral part of the vitreous.
Blau syndrome
MedGen UID:
348835
Concept ID:
C1861303
Disease or Syndrome
Blau syndrome is characterized by the triad of granulomatous arthritis, uveitis, and dermatitis. First described in 1985, it was considered to be distinct from sarcoidosis due to the early age of onset and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Published reports of sporadic cases of children with 'early-onset sarcoidosis' (EOS) with granulomatous involvement of different organs, primarily affecting joints, eyes, and skin, were suspected to represent the same disorder because the patients' characteristics were nearly identical. Subsequently, identical NOD2 mutations were identified in patients with Blau syndrome as well as in patients diagnosed with EOS, confirming earlier suspicions that they represented the same disease (summary by Borzutzky et al., 2010). Unlike older children diagnosed with sarcoidosis, these patients have no apparent pulmonary involvement; however, the disease is progressive and may result in severe complications such as blindness and/or joint destruction (Shetty and Gedalia, 1998).
Cataract 29
MedGen UID:
349376
Concept ID:
C1861831
Disease or Syndrome
Coralliform cataracts are characterized by multiple coral-like white opacities that radiate out bilaterally in an axial direction from the center of the lens in a fusiform or spindle-shaped fashion but never actually reach the capsule (summary by Gao et al., 2005).
Aniridia absent patella
MedGen UID:
400149
Concept ID:
C1862868
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract, posterior polar, 4
MedGen UID:
351162
Concept ID:
C1864567
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the PITX3 gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as congenital total and posterior polar. The preferred title/symbol for this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Posterior Polar, 4; CTPP4.'
Microphthalmia syndromic 5
MedGen UID:
350491
Concept ID:
C1864690
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma comprise the MAC spectrum of ocular malformations. Microphthalmia refers to a globe with a total axial length that is at least two standard deviations below the mean for age. Anophthalmia refers to complete absence of the globe in the presence of ocular adnexa (eyelids, conjunctiva, and lacrimal apparatus). Coloboma refers to the ocular malformations that result from failure of closure of the optic fissure. Chorioretinal coloboma refers to coloboma of the retina and choroid. Iris coloboma causes the iris to appear keyhole-shaped. Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma may be unilateral or bilateral; when bilateral they may occur in any combination.
Microphthalmia, isolated, with coloboma 3
MedGen UID:
400598
Concept ID:
C1864721
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma comprise the MAC spectrum of ocular malformations. Microphthalmia refers to a globe with a total axial length that is at least two standard deviations below the mean for age. Anophthalmia refers to complete absence of the globe in the presence of ocular adnexa (eyelids, conjunctiva, and lacrimal apparatus). Coloboma refers to the ocular malformations that result from failure of closure of the optic fissure. Chorioretinal coloboma refers to coloboma of the retina and choroid. Iris coloboma causes the iris to appear keyhole-shaped. Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma may be unilateral or bilateral; when bilateral they may occur in any combination.
Cataract, autosomal recessive congenital 2
MedGen UID:
351249
Concept ID:
C1864908
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the FYCO1 gene have been identified in families with autosomal recessive cataract described as congenital and congenital nuclear. The preferred title/symbol of this entry was formerly 'Cataract, Autosomal Recessive Congenital 2; CATC2.'
Premature aging Okamoto type
MedGen UID:
356468
Concept ID:
C1866183
Disease or Syndrome
Coloboma-obesity-hypogenitalism-mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
400954
Concept ID:
C1866256
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder, complementation group R
MedGen UID:
356213
Concept ID:
C1866351
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorder, Complementation Group R
MedGen UID:
356512
Concept ID:
C1866352
Disease or Syndrome
Proteus-like syndrome
MedGen UID:
356222
Concept ID:
C1866398
Disease or Syndrome
Proteus like syndrome describes patients who do not meet the diagnostic criteria for Proteus syndrome but who share a multitude of characteristic clinical features of the disease. The prevalence is unknown. The main clinical features include skeletal overgrowth, hamartomous overgrowth of multiple tissues, cerebriform connective tissue nevi, vascular malformations and linear epidermal nevi. Mutations in the PTEN gene are found in 50% of Proteus-like syndrome cases, making them a part of the PTEN harmatoma syndrome group.
Trichothiodystrophy 1, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
355730
Concept ID:
C1866504
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder. TTD patients have not been reported to have a predisposition to cancer (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Trichothiodystrophy Also see TTD2 (616390), caused by mutation in the ERCC3/XPB gene (133510); TTD3 (616395), caused by mutation in the GTF2H5 gene (608780); TTD4 (234050), caused by mutation in the MPLKIP gene (609188); TTD5 (300953), caused by mutation in the RNF113A gene (300951); and TTD6 (616943), caused by mutation in the GTF2E2 gene (189964).
Split hand split foot nystagmus
MedGen UID:
401072
Concept ID:
C1866740
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome with characteristics of split-hand and split-foot deformity and ocular abnormalities mainly a congenital nystagmus. Ten cases from four families have been reported in the literature. In some cases the hands are monodactylous. The affected patients have normal mental development. The condition seems to be autosomal dominant with a relatively high proportion of gonadal mosaicism.
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
358270
Concept ID:
C1869114
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, proportionate short stature, brachydactyly, and joint stiffness. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant WMS cannot be distinguished by clinical findings alone.
Weill-Marchesani syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
358388
Concept ID:
C1869115
Disease or Syndrome
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, proportionate short stature, brachydactyly, and joint stiffness. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant WMS cannot be distinguished by clinical findings alone.
Frontonasal dysplasia 1
MedGen UID:
406292
Concept ID:
C1876203
Congenital Abnormality
Frontonasal dysplasia is a condition that results from abnormal development of the head and face before birth. People with frontonasal dysplasia have at least two of the following features: widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism); a broad nose; a slit (cleft) in one or both sides of the nose; no nasal tip; a central cleft involving the nose, upper lip, or roof of the mouth (palate); incomplete formation of the front of the skull with skin covering the head where bone should be (anterior cranium bifidum occultum); or a widow's peak hairline.Other features of frontonasal dysplasia can include additional facial malformations, absence or malformation of the tissue that connects the left and right halves of the brain (the corpus callosum), and intellectual disability.There are at least three types of frontonasal dysplasia that are distinguished by their genetic causes and their signs and symptoms. In addition to the features previously described, each type of frontonasal dysplasia is associated with other distinctive features. Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 1 typically have abnormalities of the nose, a long area between the nose and upper lip (philtrum), and droopy upper eyelids (ptosis). Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 2 can have hair loss (alopecia) and an enlarged opening in the two bones that make up much of the top and sides of the skull (enlarged parietal foramina). Males with this form of the condition often have genital abnormalities. Features of frontonasal dysplasia type 3 include eyes that are missing (anophthalmia) or very small (microphthalmia) and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Frontonasal dysplasia type 3 is typically associated with the most severe facial abnormalities, but the severity of the condition varies widely, even among individuals with the same type.Life expectancy of affected individuals depends on the severity of the malformations and whether or not surgical intervention can improve associated health problems, such as breathing and feeding problems caused by the facial clefts.
Alagille syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Disease or Syndrome
Alagille syndrome (ALGS) is a complex multisystem disorder involving primarily the liver, heart, eyes, face, and skeleton. The clinical features are highly variable, even within families. The major clinical manifestations of ALGS are cholestasis, characterized by bile duct paucity on liver biopsy; congenital cardiac defects, primarily involving the pulmonary arteries; posterior embryotoxon in the eye; typical facial features; and butterfly vertebrae. Renal and central nervous abnormalities also occur. Mortality is approximately 10%, with vascular accidents, cardiac disease, and liver disease accounting for most of the deaths.
Mevalonic aciduria
MedGen UID:
368373
Concept ID:
C1959626
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonic aciduria, the first recognized defect in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, is a consequence of a deficiency of mevalonate kinase (ATP:mevalonate 5-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.36). Mevalonic acid accumulates because of failure of conversion to 5-phosphomevalonic acid, which is catalyzed by mevalonate kinase. Mevalonic acid is synthesized from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, a reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase (142910). Mevalonic aciduria is characterized by dysmorphology, psychomotor retardation, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and recurrent febrile crises, usually manifesting in early infancy, accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, and skin rash. The febrile crises are similar to those observed in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and to periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; 260920), which is also caused by mutation in the MVK gene (summary by Prietsch et al., 2003).
Retinitis pigmentosa 37
MedGen UID:
410004
Concept ID:
C1970163
Disease or Syndrome
Renal tubular acidosis, proximal, with ocular abnormalities and mental retardation
MedGen UID:
370883
Concept ID:
C1970309
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group b
MedGen UID:
373493
Concept ID:
C1970808
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals), with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years in most affected individuals; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Kahrizi syndrome
MedGen UID:
382543
Concept ID:
C2675185
Disease or Syndrome
Kahrizi syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, cataracts, coloboma, kyphosis, and coarse facial features (summary by Kahrizi et al., 2009). See also congenital disorder of glycosylation type Iq (CDG1Q; 612379), an allelic disorder with overlapping features.
Bone fragility with contractures, arterial rupture, and deafness
MedGen UID:
382811
Concept ID:
C2676285
Disease or Syndrome
Joubert syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
382940
Concept ID:
C2676788
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Oculoauricular syndrome
MedGen UID:
393758
Concept ID:
C2677500
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract, juvenile, with microcornea and glucosuria
MedGen UID:
383143
Concept ID:
C2677587
Disease or Syndrome
Deafness, cataract, retinitis pigmentosa, and sperm abnormalities
MedGen UID:
395517
Concept ID:
C2678011
Disease or Syndrome
Retinitis pigmentosa 2
MedGen UID:
394544
Concept ID:
C2681923
Disease or Syndrome
Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by constriction of the visual fields, night blindness, and fundus changes, including 'bone corpuscle' lumps of pigment. RP unassociated with other abnormalities is inherited most frequently (84%) as an autosomal recessive, next as an autosomal dominant (10%), and least frequently (6%) as an X-linked recessive in the white U.S. population (Boughman et al., 1980). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of retinitis pigmentosa, see 268000.
Refsum disease, adult, 2
MedGen UID:
440765
Concept ID:
C2749346
Disease or Syndrome
Oculodentodigital dysplasia, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
412708
Concept ID:
C2749477
Disease or Syndrome
Myopathy, mitochondrial progressive, with congenital cataract, hearing loss, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
416525
Concept ID:
C2751320
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, growth retardation, cataract, hearing loss, and unusual appearance
MedGen UID:
416652
Concept ID:
C2751870
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 46, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
473687
Concept ID:
C2828721
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia-46 (SPG46) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset in childhood of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia and cerebellar signs. Some patients have cognitive impairment, cataracts, and cerebral, cerebellar, and corpus callosum atrophy on brain imaging (summary by Boukhris et al., 2010 and Martin et al., 2013).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1J
MedGen UID:
419694
Concept ID:
C2931004
Disease or Syndrome
Like all CDGs, which are caused by a shortage of precursor monosaccharide phosphate or deficiencies in the glycosyltransferases required for lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor (LLO) synthesis, CDG Ij is caused by a defect in the formation of DPAGT1, the first dolichyl-linked intermediate of the protein N-glycosylation pathway. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065).
Leber congenital amaurosis 1
MedGen UID:
419026
Concept ID:
C2931258
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis is an eye disorder that primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. People with this disorder typically have severe visual impairment beginning in infancy. The visual impairment tends to be stable, although it may worsen very slowly over time.Leber congenital amaurosis is also associated with other vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). The pupils, which usually expand and contract in response to the amount of light entering the eye, do not react normally to light. Instead, they expand and contract more slowly than normal, or they may not respond to light at all. Additionally, the clear front covering of the eye (the cornea) may be cone-shaped and abnormally thin, a condition known as keratoconus.A specific behavior called Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign is characteristic of Leber congenital amaurosis. This sign consists of poking, pressing, and rubbing the eyes with a knuckle or finger. Researchers suspect that this behavior may contribute to deep-set eyes and keratoconus in affected children.In rare cases, delayed development and intellectual disability have been reported in people with the features of Leber congenital amaurosis. However, researchers are uncertain whether these individuals actually have Leber congenital amaurosis or another syndrome with similar signs and symptoms.At least 13 types of Leber congenital amaurosis have been described. The types are distinguished by their genetic cause, patterns of vision loss, and related eye abnormalities.
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A2
MedGen UID:
461761
Concept ID:
C3150411
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SELENON (SEPN1)-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies type A5
MedGen UID:
461763
Concept ID:
C3150413
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Beltran-Valero de Bernabe et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A6
MedGen UID:
461764
Concept ID:
C3150414
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Hemorrhagic destruction of the brain, subependymal calcification, and cataracts
MedGen UID:
462350
Concept ID:
C3151000
Disease or Syndrome
HDBSCC is an autosomal recessive disorder with a distinctive phenotype comprising hemorrhagic destruction of the brain, subependymal calcification, and congenital cataracts. Affected individuals have a catastrophic neurologic clinical course resulting in death in infancy (summary by Akawi et al., 2013).
Retinitis pigmentosa 4
MedGen UID:
462351
Concept ID:
C3151001
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis 7
MedGen UID:
462542
Concept ID:
C3151192
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis is an eye disorder that primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. People with this disorder typically have severe visual impairment beginning in infancy. The visual impairment tends to be stable, although it may worsen very slowly over time.Leber congenital amaurosis is also associated with other vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). The pupils, which usually expand and contract in response to the amount of light entering the eye, do not react normally to light. Instead, they expand and contract more slowly than normal, or they may not respond to light at all. Additionally, the clear front covering of the eye (the cornea) may be cone-shaped and abnormally thin, a condition known as keratoconus.A specific behavior called Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign is characteristic of Leber congenital amaurosis. This sign consists of poking, pressing, and rubbing the eyes with a knuckle or finger. Researchers suspect that this behavior may contribute to deep-set eyes and keratoconus in affected children.In rare cases, delayed development and intellectual disability have been reported in people with the features of Leber congenital amaurosis. However, researchers are uncertain whether these individuals actually have Leber congenital amaurosis or another syndrome with similar signs and symptoms.At least 13 types of Leber congenital amaurosis have been described. The types are distinguished by their genetic cause, patterns of vision loss, and related eye abnormalities.
Leber congenital amaurosis 8
MedGen UID:
462552
Concept ID:
C3151202
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis comprises a group of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies characterized by vision loss, nystagmus, and severe retinal dysfunction. Patients usually present at birth with profound vision loss and pendular nystagmus. Electroretinogram (ERG) responses are usually nonrecordable. Other clinical findings may include high hypermetropia, photodysphoria, oculodigital sign, keratoconus, cataracts, and a variable appearance to the fundus (summary by Chung and Traboulsi, 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCA, see 204000.
Cataract, autosomal recessive congenital 4
MedGen UID:
462654
Concept ID:
C3151304
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis 16
MedGen UID:
481692
Concept ID:
C3280062
Disease or Syndrome
Warburg micro syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
481833
Concept ID:
C3280203
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Warburg micro syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481844
Concept ID:
C3280214
Disease or Syndrome
RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus.
Myopia, high, with cataract and vitreoretinal degeneration
MedGen UID:
481976
Concept ID:
C3280346
Disease or Syndrome
Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 5
MedGen UID:
482228
Concept ID:
C3280598
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Cone-rod dystrophy 16
MedGen UID:
482675
Concept ID:
C3281045
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy (CORD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are clinically and genetically overlapping heterogeneous retinal dystrophies. RP is characterized initially by rod photoreceptor dysfunction, giving rise to night blindness, which is followed by progressive rod and cone photoreceptor dystrophy, resulting in midperipheral vision loss, tunnel vision, and sometimes blindness. In contrast to RP, CORD is characterized by a primary loss of cone photoreceptors and subsequent or simultaneous loss of rod photoreceptors. The disease in most cases becomes apparent during primary-school years, and symptoms include photoaversion, decrease in visual acuity with or without nystagmus, color vision defects, and decreased sensitivity of the central visual field. Because rods are also involved, night blindness and peripheral vision loss can occur. The diagnosis of CORD is mainly based on electroretinogram (ERG) recordings, in which cone responses are more severely reduced than, or equally as reduced as rod responses (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2012).
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A7
MedGen UID:
766244
Concept ID:
C3553330
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SELENON (SEPN1)-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 5a (zellweger)
MedGen UID:
766854
Concept ID:
C3553940
Disease or Syndrome
The peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD) Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 5 (CG5, equivalent to CG10 and CGF) have mutations in the PEX2 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8A
MedGen UID:
766873
Concept ID:
C3553959
Disease or Syndrome
Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD) have mutations in the PEX16 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8B
MedGen UID:
766874
Concept ID:
C3553960
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX16 gene have cells of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 11B
MedGen UID:
766915
Concept ID:
C3554001
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX13 gene have cells of complementation group 13 (CG13, equivalent to CGH). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly 10
MedGen UID:
767413
Concept ID:
C3554499
Disease or Syndrome
Primary microcephaly-10 (MCPH10) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extremely small head size (-9 SD) at birth and death usually by 1 year of age. Neuropathologic examination shows severe loss of neurons as well as neuronal loss of polarity and abnormal dendritic maturation (summary by Yang et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary microcephaly, see MCPH1 (251200).
Cowden syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
767432
Concept ID:
C3554518
Disease or Syndrome
Cowden syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
767433
Concept ID:
C3554519
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 11
MedGen UID:
767552
Concept ID:
C3554638
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with congenital muscular dystrophy resulting in muscle weakness early in life and brain and eye anomalies. It is usually associated with delayed psychomotor development and shortened life expectancy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Stevens et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
812504
Concept ID:
C3806174
Disease or Syndrome
BBS18 is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy described in a single patient and characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, kidney failure, and cognitive disability (Scheidecker et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 12
MedGen UID:
815294
Concept ID:
C3808964
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with congenital muscular dystrophy resulting in muscle weakness early in life and brain and eye anomalies. It is usually associated with delayed psychomotor development and shortened life expectancy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designations Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB). The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as dystroglycanopathies (summary by Stevens et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Cataract 15, multiple types
MedGen UID:
815331
Concept ID:
C3809001
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the MIP gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as 'polymorphic,' progressive punctate lamellar, cortical, anterior and posterior polar, nonprogressive lamellar with sutural opacities, embryonic nuclear, and pulverulent cortical.
Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 2S
MedGen UID:
815566
Concept ID:
C3809236
Disease or Syndrome
LGMD2S is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMD2A (253600).
Microphthalmia/coloboma and skeletal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
862977
Concept ID:
C4014540
Disease or Syndrome
Cataracts, growth hormone deficiency, sensory neuropathy, sensorineural hearing loss, and skeletal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
863379
Concept ID:
C4014942
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisomal fatty acyl-coa reductase 1 disorder
MedGen UID:
863781
Concept ID:
C4015344
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA reductase-1 disorder is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in infancy of severely delayed psychomotor development, growth retardation with microcephaly, and seizures. Some patients may have congenital cataracts and develop spasticity later in childhood. Biochemical studies tend to show decreased plasmalogen, consistent with a peroxisomal defect. The disorder is reminiscent of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (see, e.g., RCDP1, 215100), although the characteristic skeletal abnormalities observed in RCDP are absent (Buchert et al., 2014).
Microcephaly and chorioretinopathy, autosomal recessive, 2
MedGen UID:
863825
Concept ID:
C4015388
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly and chorioretinopathy-2 is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, visual impairment, and short stature (summary by Martin et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of microcephaly and chorioretinopathy, see MCCRP1 (251270).
Trichothiodystrophy 3, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
865608
Concept ID:
C4017171
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder. Patients with TTD have not been reported to have a predisposition to cancer (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of TTD, see 601675.
MEND syndrome
MedGen UID:
905986
Concept ID:
C4085243
Disease or Syndrome
Male EBP disorder with neurologic defects is an X-linked recessive disorder representing a continuous phenotypic spectrum with variable manifestations associated with a defect in sterol biosynthesis. Features include intellectual disability, short stature, scoliosis, digital abnormalities, cataracts, and dermatologic abnormalities. Not all patients show all features, and the severity is highly variable. Molecular studies indicate that affected males are hemizygous for a nonmosaic hypomorphic EBP allele. Carrier females are generally clinically asymptomatic, but may show biochemical abnormalities (summary by Arnold et al., 2012 and Barboza-Cerda et al., 2014).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type a, 9
MedGen UID:
902513
Concept ID:
C4225291
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A) is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, and congenital muscular dystrophy. The phenotype includes the alternative clinical designation Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), which is associated with death in infancy. The disorder represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (summary by Geis et al., 2013 and Riemersma et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Basel-Vanagaite-Smirin-Yosef syndrome
MedGen UID:
897292
Concept ID:
C4225323
Disease or Syndrome
Basel-Vanagaite-Smirin-Yosef syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly disorder characterized by severely delayed psychomotor development resulting in mental retardation, as well as variable eye, brain, cardiac, and palatal abnormalities (summary by Basel-Vanagaite et al., 2015).
Mental retardation, X-linked 99, syndromic, female-restricted
MedGen UID:
899839
Concept ID:
C4225416
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Female-restricted X-linked syndromic mental retardation-99 is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and mild to moderate intellectual disability. Affected females can have a wide range of additional congenital anomalies, including scoliosis, postaxial polydactyly, mild cardiac or urogenital anomalies, dysmorphic facial features, and mild structural brain abnormalities (summary by Reijnders et al., 2016).
Anterior segment dysgenesis 8
MedGen UID:
934589
Concept ID:
C4310622
Disease or Syndrome
Anterior segment dysgeneses (ASGD or ASMD) are a heterogeneous group of developmental disorders affecting the anterior segment of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, trabecular meshwork, and Schlemm canal. The clinical features of ASGD include iris hypoplasia, an enlarged or reduced corneal diameter, corneal vascularization and opacity, posterior embryotoxon, corectopia, polycoria, an abnormal iridocorneal angle, ectopia lentis, and anterior synechiae between the iris and posterior corneal surface (summary by Cheong et al., 2016).
3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIII
MedGen UID:
934617
Concept ID:
C4310650
Disease or Syndrome
MGCA8 is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder resulting in death in infancy. Features include hypotonia, abnormal movements, respiratory insufficiency with apneic episodes, and lack of developmental progress, often with seizures. Brain imaging is variable, but may show progressive cerebral atrophy. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, suggesting a mitochondrial defect (summary by Mandel et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, see MGCA type I (250950).
Aniridia 3
MedGen UID:
934662
Concept ID:
C4310695
Congenital Abnormality
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 24
MedGen UID:
934666
Concept ID:
C4310699
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 10b
MedGen UID:
1379481
Concept ID:
C4479254
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy, cataracts, feeding difficulties, and delayed brain myelination
MedGen UID:
1377894
Concept ID:
C4479333
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy, cataracts, feeding difficulties, and delayed brain myelination is a syndromic form of severe to profound intellectual disability with onset of delayed psychomotor development and seizures in infancy. Affected children have hypotonia, feeding difficulties resulting in failure to thrive, and inability to speak or walk, and they tend to show repetitive stereotypic behaviors. Brain imaging shows cerebral atrophy and delayed myelination (summary by Schoch et al., 2017).
Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with cataracts and intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
1382291
Concept ID:
C4479410
Disease or Syndrome
MDCCAID is an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy with onset of progressive muscle weakness in early childhood. Almost all patients also have early-onset cataracts, most have intellectual disability of varying severity, and some have seizures (summary by Wiessner et al., 2017 and Osborn et al., 2017).
Macrothrombocytopenia and progressive sensorineural deafness
MedGen UID:
371830
Concept ID:
C1834478
Disease or Syndrome
MYH9-related disorders (MYH9RD) are characterized by large platelets (i.e., >40% of platelets >3.9 µm in diameter) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 109/L), both of which are present from birth. MYH9RD is variably associated with young-adult onset of progressive sensorineural hearing loss, presenile cataract, elevation of liver enzymes, and renal disease manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy. Before identification of the gene in which mutation is causative, MYH9, individuals with MYH9RD were diagnosed as having Epstein syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, May-Hegglin anomaly, or Sebastian syndrome based on the combination of different clinical findings at the time of diagnosis. However, the realization that they all are due to heterozygous pathogenic variants in MYH9 and that the clinical findings often worsen throughout life as a result of late onset of non-hematologic manifestations has led the four conditions to be regarded as one disorder, now known as MYH9RD.
Sebastian syndrome
MedGen UID:
344306
Concept ID:
C1854520
Disease or Syndrome
MYH9-related disorders (MYH9RD) are characterized by large platelets (i.e., >40% of platelets >3.9 µm in diameter) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 109/L), both of which are present from birth. MYH9RD is variably associated with young-adult onset of progressive sensorineural hearing loss, presenile cataract, elevation of liver enzymes, and renal disease manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy. Before identification of the gene in which mutation is causative, MYH9, individuals with MYH9RD were diagnosed as having Epstein syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, May-Hegglin anomaly, or Sebastian syndrome based on the combination of different clinical findings at the time of diagnosis. However, the realization that they all are due to heterozygous pathogenic variants in MYH9 and that the clinical findings often worsen throughout life as a result of late onset of non-hematologic manifestations has led the four conditions to be regarded as one disorder, now known as MYH9RD.
Storm syndrome
MedGen UID:
350029
Concept ID:
C1861452
Disease or Syndrome
Even-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
904613
Concept ID:
C4225180
Disease or Syndrome
EVEN-PLUS syndrome is characterized by prenatal-onset short stature, vertebral and epiphyseal changes, microtia, midface hypoplasia with flat nose and triangular nares, cardiac malformations, and other findings including anal atresia, hypodontia, and aplasia cutis. The features overlap those reported in patients with CODAS syndrome (600373; Royer-Bertrand et al., 2015).
Trichothiodystrophy 6, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
934752
Concept ID:
C4310785
Disease or Syndrome

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Cui X, Zhou Z, Zhu K, Feng R, Han J, Li M, Wang S, Li J, Zhang J, Jiang Q, Zhang W, Mu H, Liu Y, Hu Y
DNA Cell Biol 2018 May;37(5):449-456. Epub 2018 Feb 28 doi: 10.1089/dna.2017.4051. PMID: 29489419
Magnusson G, Haargaard B, Basit S, Lundvall A, Nyström A, Rosensvärd A, Tornqvist K
Acta Ophthalmol 2018 Feb;96(1):51-55. Epub 2017 Jun 14 doi: 10.1111/aos.13497. PMID: 28612950
Bohman E, Wyon M, Lundström M, Dafgård Kopp E
Acta Ophthalmol 2018 Feb;96(1):77-80. Epub 2017 Apr 26 doi: 10.1111/aos.13447. PMID: 28444824
Sagdik HM, Ucar F, Tetikoglu M, Aktas S, Ozcura F, Kocak H, Neselioglu S, Eren F
Int Ophthalmol 2018 Apr;38(2):655-661. Epub 2017 Apr 10 doi: 10.1007/s10792-017-0513-7. PMID: 28397146
Weingessel B, Wahl M, Vécsei-Marlovits PV
Acta Ophthalmol 2018 Feb;96(1):88-94. Epub 2017 Mar 30 doi: 10.1111/aos.13439. PMID: 28371427

Diagnosis

de Almeida Ferreira G, Schaal LF, Ferro MD, Rodrigues ACL, Khandekar R, Schellini SA
BMC Ophthalmol 2017 Dec 22;17(1):259. doi: 10.1186/s12886-017-0637-6. PMID: 29273018Free PMC Article
Lee H, Jang YJ, Lee HK, Kang HY
Korean J Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;31(6):557-567. Epub 2017 Nov 24 doi: 10.3341/kjo.2017.0025. PMID: 29022298Free PMC Article
Park S, Choi NK
Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2017 Oct;24(5):281-286. Epub 2017 Jun 28 doi: 10.1080/09286586.2017.1281427. PMID: 28657409
Denniston AK, Chakravarthy U, Zhu H, Lee AY, Crabb DP, Tufail A, Bailey C, Akerele T, Al-Husainy S, Brand C, Downey L, Fitt A, Khan R, Kumar V, Lobo A, Mahmood S, Mandal K, Mckibbin M, Menon G, Natha S, Ong JM, Tsaloumas MD, Varma A, Wilkinson E, Johnston RL, Egan CA; UK DR EMR Users Group.
Br J Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;101(12):1673-1678. Epub 2017 May 9 doi: 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2016-309838. PMID: 28487377
Knaapi L, Lehtonen T, Vesti E
Acta Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;95(8):839-841. Epub 2017 Mar 31 doi: 10.1111/aos.13435. PMID: 28371281

Therapy

Murphy P, Kabir MH, Srivastava T, Mason ME, Dewi CU, Lim S, Yang A, Djordjevic D, Killingsworth MC, Ho JWK, Harman DG, O'Connor MD
Development 2018 Jan 9;145(1) doi: 10.1242/dev.155838. PMID: 29217756Free PMC Article
García-Layana A, Ciufo G, Toledo E, Martínez-González MA, Corella D, Fitó M, Estruch R, Gómez-Gracia E, Fiol M, Lapetra J, Serra-Majem L, Pintó X, Portillo MP, Sorli JV, Bulló M, Vinyoles E, Sala-Vila A, Ros E, Salas-Salvadó J, Arós F
Nutrients 2017 May 3;9(5) doi: 10.3390/nu9050453. PMID: 28467363Free PMC Article
Knaapi L, Lehtonen T, Vesti E
Acta Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;95(8):839-841. Epub 2017 Mar 31 doi: 10.1111/aos.13435. PMID: 28371281
Chou PH, Chu CS, Chen YH, Hsu MY, Huang MW, Lan TH, Lin CH
J Affect Disord 2017 Jun;215:237-244. Epub 2017 Mar 18 doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2017.03.044. PMID: 28342338
Varssano D, Friedman M, Goldstein M, Bar-Sela S, Sella T, Shalev V, Chodick G
Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2017 Oct;24(5):336-340. Epub 2017 Mar 13 doi: 10.1080/09286586.2017.1291844. PMID: 28287855

Prognosis

Weingessel B, Wahl M, Vécsei-Marlovits PV
Acta Ophthalmol 2018 Feb;96(1):88-94. Epub 2017 Mar 30 doi: 10.1111/aos.13439. PMID: 28371427
de Almeida Ferreira G, Schaal LF, Ferro MD, Rodrigues ACL, Khandekar R, Schellini SA
BMC Ophthalmol 2017 Dec 22;17(1):259. doi: 10.1186/s12886-017-0637-6. PMID: 29273018Free PMC Article
Lee H, Jang YJ, Lee HK, Kang HY
Korean J Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;31(6):557-567. Epub 2017 Nov 24 doi: 10.3341/kjo.2017.0025. PMID: 29022298Free PMC Article
Denniston AK, Chakravarthy U, Zhu H, Lee AY, Crabb DP, Tufail A, Bailey C, Akerele T, Al-Husainy S, Brand C, Downey L, Fitt A, Khan R, Kumar V, Lobo A, Mahmood S, Mandal K, Mckibbin M, Menon G, Natha S, Ong JM, Tsaloumas MD, Varma A, Wilkinson E, Johnston RL, Egan CA; UK DR EMR Users Group.
Br J Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;101(12):1673-1678. Epub 2017 May 9 doi: 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2016-309838. PMID: 28487377
Bhikoo R, Vellara H, Lolokabaira S, Murray N, Sikivou B, McGhee C
Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2017 Nov;45(8):812-819. Epub 2017 May 15 doi: 10.1111/ceo.12965. PMID: 28421654

Clinical prediction guides

Bohman E, Wyon M, Lundström M, Dafgård Kopp E
Acta Ophthalmol 2018 Feb;96(1):77-80. Epub 2017 Apr 26 doi: 10.1111/aos.13447. PMID: 28444824
Weingessel B, Wahl M, Vécsei-Marlovits PV
Acta Ophthalmol 2018 Feb;96(1):88-94. Epub 2017 Mar 30 doi: 10.1111/aos.13439. PMID: 28371427
Lee H, Jang YJ, Lee HK, Kang HY
Korean J Ophthalmol 2017 Dec;31(6):557-567. Epub 2017 Nov 24 doi: 10.3341/kjo.2017.0025. PMID: 29022298Free PMC Article
Wu C, Liu Z, Ma L, Pei C, Qin L, Gao N, Li J, Yin Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2017 Aug 14;17(1):142. doi: 10.1186/s12886-017-0537-9. PMID: 28806956Free PMC Article
Kumar V, Gour S, Peter OS, Gandhi S, Goyal P, Pandey J, Harsolia RS, Yadav JK
Curr Eye Res 2017 Oct;42(10):1368-1377. Epub 2017 Jun 19 doi: 10.1080/02713683.2017.1324628. PMID: 28628342

Recent systematic reviews

Fu Y, Dai Q, Zhu L, Wu S
BMC Ophthalmol 2018 Feb 6;18(1):31. doi: 10.1186/s12886-018-0699-0. PMID: 29409486Free PMC Article
Zhang X, Li EY, Leung CK, Musch DC, Tang X, Zheng C, He M, Chang DF, Lam DS
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