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Items: 16

1.

Oligodendroglioma

A relatively slow-growing glioma that is derived from oligodendrocytes and tends to occur in the cerebral hemispheres, thalamus, or lateral ventricle. They may present at any age, but are most frequent in the third to fifth decades, with an earlier incidence peak in the first decade. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, relatively avascular, and tend to form cysts and microcalcifications. Neoplastic cells tend to have small round nuclei surrounded by unstained nuclei. The tumors may vary from well-differentiated to highly anaplastic forms. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2052; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p655) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45190
Concept ID:
C0028945
Neoplastic Process
2.

Morphological abnormality of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428288
Concept ID:
CN001820
Finding
3.

Ataxia

A type of ataxia characterized by the impairment of the ability to smoothly perform the elements of a voluntary movement in the appropriate order and speed. With dyssynergia, a voluntary movement appears broken down into its component parts. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
13945
Concept ID:
C0004134
Sign or Symptom
4.

Vomiting

MedGen UID:
776588
Concept ID:
C2712332
Finding
5.

Ataxia

Cerebellar ataxia refers to ataxia due to dysfunction of the cerebellum. This causes a variety of elementary neurological deficits including asynergy (lack of coordination between muscles, limbs and joints), dysmetria (lack of ability to judge distances that can lead to under- oder overshoot in grasping movements), and dysdiadochokinesia (inability to perform rapid movements requiring antagonizing muscle groups to be switched on and off repeatedly). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504767
Concept ID:
CN001146
Finding
6.

CSF pleocytosis

MedGen UID:
489830
Concept ID:
C0742915
Finding
7.

Headache

MedGen UID:
472355
Concept ID:
C2096315
Finding
8.

Nystagmus

MedGen UID:
409575
Concept ID:
C1963184
Finding
9.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases that result in a progressive retinal degeneration affecting 1 in 3,000 to 5,000 people (Veltel et al., 2008). Symptoms include night blindness, the development of tunnel vision, and slowly progressive decreased central vision starting at approximately 20 years of age. Upon examination, patients have decreased visual acuity, constricted visual fields, dyschromatopsia (tritanopic; see 190900), and the classic fundus appearance with dark pigmentary clumps in the midperiphery and perivenous areas ('bone spicules'), attenuated retinal vessels, cystoid macular edema, fine pigmented vitreous cells, and waxy optic disc pallor. RP is associated with posterior subcapsular cataracts in 39 to 72% of patients, high myopia, astigmatism, keratoconus, and mild hearing loss in 30% of patients (excluding patients with Usher syndrome; see 276900). Fifty percent of female carriers of X-linked RP have a golden reflex in the posterior pole (summary by Kaiser et al., 2004). Juvenile Retinitis Pigmentosa Autosomal recessive childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting rod and cone photoreceptors simultaneously. The most severe cases are termed Leber congenital amaurosis (see 204000), whereas the less aggressive forms are usually considered juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (Gu et al., 1997). Autosomal recessive forms of juvenile retinitis pigmentosa can be caused by mutation in the SPATA7 (609868), LRAT (604863), and TULP1 (602280) genes (see LCA3, 604232, LCA14, 613341, and LCA15, 613843, respectively). An autosomal dominant form of juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (see 604393) is caused by mutation in the AIPL1 gene (604392). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20551
Concept ID:
C0035334
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Neuroepithelial neoplasm

Neoplasms composed of neuroepithelial cells, which have the capacity to differentiate into NEURONS, oligodendrocytes, and ASTROCYTES. The majority of craniospinal tumors are of neuroepithelial origin. (From Dev Biol 1998 Aug 1;200(1):1-5) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
60215
Concept ID:
C0206715
Neoplastic Process
11.

Neuroectodermal neoplasm

A neoplasm arising in the neuroectoderm, the portion of the ectoderm of the early embryo that gives rise to the central and peripheral nervous systems, including some glial cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
60072
Concept ID:
C0206093
Neoplastic Process
12.

Unspecified encephalopathy

Encephalopathy is a term that means brain disease, damage, or malfunction. In general, encephalopathy is manifested by an altered mental state. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39314
Concept ID:
C0085584
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Nervous tissue neoplasm

A neoplasm derived from nervous tissue (not necessarity a neoplasm located in the nervous system). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
14324
Concept ID:
C0027665
Neoplastic Process
14.

Neoplasm of brain

A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, and they start somewhere else in the body and move to the brain. Brain tumors can cause many symptoms. Some of the most common are. -Headaches, often in the morning . -Nausea and vomiting. -Changes in your ability to talk, hear, or see. -Problems with balance or walking. -Problems with thinking or memory . -Feeling weak or sleepy. -Changes in your mood or behavior. -Seizures. Doctors diagnose brain tumors by doing a neurologic exam and tests including an MRI, CT scan, and biopsy. Treatment options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Many people get a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14216
Concept ID:
C0006118
Neoplastic Process
15.

Glioma

The presence of a glioma, which is a neoplasm of the central nervous system originating from a glial cell (astrocytes or oligodendrocytes). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
9030
Concept ID:
C0017638
Neoplastic Process
16.

CNS infection

Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal infections; PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS; HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2948
Concept ID:
C0007684
Disease or Syndrome
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