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Items: 6

1.

Hyperphosphatemia

An abnormally increased phosphate concentration in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39326
Concept ID:
C0085681
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Calcitriol

most biologically active metabolite of cholecalciferol; acts via a DNA-binding steroid receptor which induces transcription of calcium transport factors in gut; USP drug (calcitriol) is given as an antihypocalcemic. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
14276
Concept ID:
C0006674
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
3.

Chronic kidney disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of your blood to make urine. They also keep the body's chemical balance, help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged and can't filter blood as they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in your body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. The kidney damage occurs slowly over many years. Many people don't have any symptoms until their kidney disease is very advanced. Blood and urine tests are the only way to know if you have kidney disease. Treatment may include medicines to lower blood pressure, control blood glucose, and lower blood cholesterol. CKD can get worse over time. CKD may lead to kidney failure. The only treatment options for kidney failure are dialysis or a kidney transplantation. You can take steps to keep your kidneys healthier longer:. -Choose foods with less salt (sodium). -Keep your blood pressure below 130/80. -Keep your blood glucose in the target range, if you have diabetes. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
473458
Concept ID:
C1561643
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Chronic kidney disease

Functional anomaly of the kidney persisting for at least three months. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
196667
Concept ID:
C0748318
Finding
5.

Abnormality of the kidney

An abnormality of the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
78593
Concept ID:
C0266292
Congenital Abnormality
6.

Nephropathy

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
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