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Items: 9

1.

Sumatriptan

A sulfonamide triptan with vasoconstrictor activity. Sumatriptan selectively binds to and activates serotonin 5-HT1D receptors in the central nervous system (CNS), thereby constricting cerebral blood vessels. This may lead to a relief in pain from vascular headaches. Sumatriptan may also relieve vascular headaches by decreasing the release of vasoactive neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal axons in the dura mater during a migraine, by reducing extravasation of plasma proteins, and by decreasing the release of other mediators of inflammation from the trigeminal nerve. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
23172
Concept ID:
C0075632
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Mental Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include . -Sadness. -Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy. -Change in weight. -Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping. -Energy loss. -Feelings of worthlessness. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, environmental, psychological, and biochemical factors. Depression usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Most people do best by using both. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8325
Concept ID:
C0011570
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include. -Panic disorder . -Obsessive-compulsive disorder . -Post-traumatic stress disorder . -Phobias . -Generalized anxiety disorder . Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1613
Concept ID:
C0003467
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Depression

MedGen UID:
881016
Concept ID:
CN236657
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Moderate

Moderate; minimal, local or noninvasive intervention indicated; limiting age-appropriate instrumental activites of daily living. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
525853
Concept ID:
C0205081
Qualitative Concept
6.

Migraine

Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by episodic attacks of headache and associated symptoms. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505085
Concept ID:
CN001878
Finding
7.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Disease or Syndrome; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
8.

Migraine

Migraine is the most common type of chronic, episodic headache, as summarized by Featherstone (1985). One locus for migraine with or without aura (MGR1) has been identified on chromosome 4q24. Other loci for migraine have been identified on 6p21.1-p12.2 (MGR3; 607498), 14q21.2-q22.3 (MGR4; 607501), 19p13 (MGR5; 607508), 1q31 (MGR6; 607516), 15q11-q13 (MGR7; 609179), 5q21 (with or without aura, MGR8, 609570; with aura, MGR9, 609670), 17p13 (MGR10; 610208), 18q12 (MGR11; 610209), 10q22-q23 (MGR12; 611706), and the X chromosome (MGR2; 300125). Mutation in the KCNK18 gene (613655) on chromosome 10q25 causes migraine with aura (MGR13; 613656). A subtype of autosomal dominant migraine with aura (MA), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM; see 141500), is caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011) on chromosome 19p13 (FHM1; 141500), by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340) on chromosome 1q21 (FHM2; 602481), or by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24 (FHM3; 609634). Another locus for FHM has been mapped to chromosome 1q31 (FHM4; see 607516). There is evidence that a polymorphism in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1; 133430.0005) and a polymorphism in the TNF gene (191160.0004) may confer susceptibility to migraine. A polymorphism in the endothelin receptor type A gene (EDNRA; 131243.0001) may confer resistance to migraine. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
57451
Concept ID:
C0149931
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include : -Sadness. -Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy. -Change in weight. -Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping. -Energy loss. -Feelings of worthlessness. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, environmental, psychological, and biochemical factors. Depression usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Most people do best by using both. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4229
Concept ID:
C0011581
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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