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Items: 6

1.

B-Cell Leukemia

A malignant disease of the B-LYMPHOCYTES in the bone marrow and/or blood. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
412152
Concept ID:
C2004493
Neoplastic Process
2.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
3.

B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

The most frequent type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Approximately 75% of cases occur in children under six years of age. This is a good prognosis leukemia. In the pediatric age group the complete remission rate is approximately 95% and the disease free survival rate is 70%. Approximately 80% of children appear to be cured. In the adult age group the complete remission rate is 60-85%. (WHO, 2001) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
226949
Concept ID:
C1292769
Neoplastic Process
4.

Enlarged kidney

An abnormal increase in the size of the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
108156
Concept ID:
C0542518
Finding
5.

Bilateral

Being present on both sides of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
65977
Concept ID:
C0238767
Spatial Concept
6.

Leukemic infiltration

A pathologic change in leukemia in which leukemic cells permeate various organs at any stage of the disease. All types of leukemia show various degrees of infiltration, depending upon the type of leukemia. The degree of infiltration may vary from site to site. The liver and spleen are common sites of infiltration, the greatest appearing in myelocytic leukemia, but infiltration is seen also in the granulocytic and lymphocytic types. The kidney is also a common site and of the gastrointestinal system, the stomach and ileum are commonly involved. In lymphocytic leukemia the skin is often infiltrated. The central nervous system too is a common site. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
58150
Concept ID:
C0162679
Neoplastic Process
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