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Items: 19

1.

Shprintzen syndrome

Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a range of findings including the following: Congenital heart disease (74% of individuals), particularly conotruncal malformations (tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, ventricular septal defect, and truncus arteriosus). Palatal abnormalities (69%), particularly velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate. Characteristic facial features (present in the majority of individuals of northern European heritage). Learning difficulties (70%-90%). An immune deficiency (regardless of the clinical presentation) (77%). Additional findings include the following: Hypocalcemia (50%). Significant feeding and swallowing problems; constipation with or without structural gastrointestinal anomalies (intestinal malrotation, imperforate anus, and Hirschsprung disease). Renal anomalies (31%). Hearing loss (both conductive and sensorineural). Laryngotracheoesophageal anomalies. Growth hormone deficiency. Autoimmune disorders. Seizures (idiopathic or associated with hypocalcemia). CNS anomalies including tethered cord. Skeletal abnormalities (scoliosis with or without vertebral anomalies, clubbed feet, polydactyly, and craniosynostosis). Ophthalmologic abnormalities (strabismus, posterior embryotoxon, tortuous retinal vessels, scleracornea, and anophthalmia). Enamel hypoplasia. Malignancies (rare). Developmental delay (in particular delays in emergence of language), intellectual disability, and learning differences (non-verbal learning disability where the verbal IQ is significantly greater than the performance IQ) are common. Autism or autistic spectrum disorder is found in approximately 20% of children and psychiatric illness (specifically schizophrenia) is present in 25% of adults; however, attention deficit disorder, anxiety, perseveration, and difficulty with social interactions are also common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
65085
Concept ID:
C0220704
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is highly heritable, as shown by family, twin, and adoption studies. For example, for identical twins, if one twin develops schizophrenia, the other twin has about a 50% chance of also developing the disease. The risk of the general population developing the schizophrenia is about 0.3-0.7% worldwide. The search for “schizophrenia genes” has been elusive. Initial linkage studies looked at parts of the genome associated with schizophrenia, and many candidate genes were identified, including APOE, COMT, DAO, DRD1, DRD2, DRD4, DTNBP1, GABRB2, GRIN2B, HP, IL1B, MTHFR, PLXNA2, SLC6A4, TP53, and TPH1. However, some of these have later been questioned. Microdeletions and microduplications have been found to be three times more common in individuals with schizophrenia, compared to controls. Because these deletions and duplications are in genes that are overexpressed in pathways related to brain development, it is possible that the inheritance of multiple rare variants may contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Several genetic disorders feature schizophrenia as a clinical feature. The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome comprises many different syndromes, of which one of the most serious is DiGeorge syndrome. Children born with DiGeorge syndrome typically have heart defects, cleft palate, learning difficulties, and immune deficiency. Schizophrenia is a late manifestation, affecting around 30% of individuals. Microdeletions and duplications in chromosome 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 16 have also been associated with schizophrenia. In 2014, a genome-wide association study looked at the genomes of over 35,000 patients and 110,00 controls. The study identified 108 SNPs that were associated with schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported. As expected, many of these loci occurred in genes that are expressed in the brain. For example, the SNPs included a gene that encodes the dopamine D2 receptor, DRD2 (the target of antipsychotic drugs), and many genes involved in glutamine neurotransmitter pathways and synaptic plasticity (e.g., GRM3, GRIN2A, SRR, GRIA1). More surprisingly, however, associations were also enriched among genes expressed in tissues with important immune functions. In 2016, a study based on nearly 65,000 people investigated the association between schizophrenia and variation in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus—a region on chromosome 6 that is important for immune function. The study focused on the C4 gene (complement component 4) that exists as two distinct genes: C4A and C4B, which encode particularly structurally diverse alleles. The study found that the alleles which promoted greater expression of C4A in the brain were associated with a greater risk of schizophrenia. By using mice models, the study showed that C4 is involved in the elimination of synapses during brain maturation. In humans, “synaptic pruning” is most active during late adolescence, which coincides with the typical onset of symptoms of schizophrenia. It is therefore possible that the inheritance of specific C4A alleles could lead to “run away” synaptic pruning, increasing the risk of schizophrenia. Further research may even determine C4 as a potential therapeutic target. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
48574
Concept ID:
C0036341
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Syndrome

A characteristic symptom complex. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
4.

DiGeorge sequence

Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a range of findings including the following: Congenital heart disease (74% of individuals), particularly conotruncal malformations (tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, ventricular septal defect, and truncus arteriosus). Palatal abnormalities (69%), particularly velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate. Characteristic facial features (present in the majority of individuals of northern European heritage). Learning difficulties (70%-90%). An immune deficiency (regardless of the clinical presentation) (77%). Additional findings include the following: Hypocalcemia (50%). Significant feeding and swallowing problems; constipation with or without structural gastrointestinal anomalies (intestinal malrotation, imperforate anus, and Hirschsprung disease). Renal anomalies (31%). Hearing loss (both conductive and sensorineural). Laryngotracheoesophageal anomalies. Growth hormone deficiency. Autoimmune disorders. Seizures (idiopathic or associated with hypocalcemia). CNS anomalies including tethered cord. Skeletal abnormalities (scoliosis with or without vertebral anomalies, clubbed feet, polydactyly, and craniosynostosis). Ophthalmologic abnormalities (strabismus, posterior embryotoxon, tortuous retinal vessels, scleracornea, and anophthalmia). Enamel hypoplasia. Malignancies (rare). Developmental delay (in particular delays in emergence of language), intellectual disability, and learning differences (non-verbal learning disability where the verbal IQ is significantly greater than the performance IQ) are common. Autism or autistic spectrum disorder is found in approximately 20% of children and psychiatric illness (specifically schizophrenia) is present in 25% of adults; however, attention deficit disorder, anxiety, perseveration, and difficulty with social interactions are also common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
4297
Concept ID:
C0012236
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Moderate

Having a medium degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between three and four standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
525853
Concept ID:
C0205081
Qualitative Concept
7.

Chromosome 22q deletion

MedGen UID:
435017
Concept ID:
CN072191
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Mitochondrial inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Because the mitochondrial genome is essentially always maternally inherited, a mitochondrial condition can only be transmitted by females, although the condition can affect both sexes. The proportion of mutant mitochondria can vary (heteroplasmy). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
165802
Concept ID:
C0887941
Genetic Function
9.

Severe

Having a high degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between four and five standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
Qualitative Concept
10.

Hyperprolinemia

MedGen UID:
75690
Concept ID:
C0268528
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Risk factor

An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiological evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48477
Concept ID:
C0035648
Finding
12.

Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders

Marked disorders of thought (delusions, hallucinations, or other thought disorder accompanied by disordered affect or behavior), and deterioration from a previous level of functioning. Individuals have one o more of the following symptoms: delusions, hallucinations, and disorganized speech. (from DSM-5) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
141907
Concept ID:
C0525046
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
14.

Riboflavin

An essential human nutrient that is a heat-stable and water-soluble flavin belonging to the vitamin B family. Riboflavin is a precursor of the coenzymes flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). These coenzymes are of vital importance in normal tissue respiration, pyridoxine activation, tryptophan to niacin conversion, fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism, and glutathione reductase mediated detoxification. Riboflavin may also be involved in maintaining erythrocyte integrity. This vitamin is essential for healthy skin, nails, and hair. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
19794
Concept ID:
C0035527
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
15.

Mental disorder

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Amino acid

Any organic compounds containing amino (-NH2) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups. In biochemistry, used to refer to the twenty-plus L-alpha-amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Nucleotides, Adenine

condensation product of adenosine and phosphoric acid; a nucleotide found among the hydrolysis products of all nucleic acids. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
120
Concept ID:
C0001413
Biologically Active Substance; Nucleic Acid, Nucleoside, or Nucleotide; Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Hyperdicarboxylicaminoaciduria AND hyperprolinemia

MedGen UID:
541353
Concept ID:
C0268533
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Riboflavin Metabolism Pathway

The chemical reactions and pathways involving riboflavin (vitamin B2), the precursor for the coenzymes flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). [GOC:jl, http://www.indstate.edu/thcme/mwking/vitamins.html] [from GO]

MedGen UID:
257889
Concept ID:
C1159440
Molecular Function
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