Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 29

1.

Metabolic syndrome X

A clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose levels is sometimes called metabolic syndrome X (Reaven, 1988) or abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome (Bjorntorp, 1991). The syndrome may affect nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults and is considered a veritable epidemic (Ford et al., 2002). It is a major risk factor for both diabetes mellitus (see 125853 and Haffner et al., 1992) and cardiovascular disease (Isomaa et al., 2001). The etiology is complex, determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence varies substantially among ethnic groups, with the highest rates in Mexican American women (Park et al., 2003). Other factors influencing the metabolic syndrome include age, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical inactivity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome AOMS2 (605572) has been mapped to chromosome 17p12. AOMS3 (615812) is caused by mutation in the DYRK1B gene (604556) on chromosome 19q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
99356
Concept ID:
C0524620
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Abnormality of lipid metabolism

Abnormalities in the serum levels of LIPIDS, including overproduction or deficiency. Abnormal serum lipid profiles may include high total CHOLESTEROL, high TRIGLYCERIDES, low HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL, and elevated LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
66067
Concept ID:
C0242339
Disease or Syndrome
3.

MEN 935

MedGen UID:
121442
Concept ID:
C0619266
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Temporal Concept
5.

Risk factor

Something that increases the chance of developing a disease. Some examples of risk factors for cancer are age, a family history of certain cancers, use of tobacco products, being exposed to radiation or certain chemicals, infection with certain viruses or bacteria, and certain genetic changes. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
48477
Concept ID:
C0035648
Finding
6.

Glucose

A type of sugar; the chief source of energy for living organisms. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
42238
Concept ID:
C0017725
Biologically Active Substance; Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar or glucose. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose into your cells to give them energy. Hyperglycemia happens when your body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use it the right way. People with diabetes can get hyperglycemia from not eating the right foods or not taking medicines correctly. Other problems that can raise blood sugar include infections, certain medicines, hormone imbalances, or severe illnesses.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5689
Concept ID:
C0020456
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
11.

Fasting

No enteral intake of foot or liquids whatsoever, no smoking. Typically 6 to 8 hours before anesthesia.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
5129
Concept ID:
C0015663
Finding
12.

Absence

MedGen UID:
739164
Concept ID:
C1689985
Anatomical Abnormality
13.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
14.

Pressure

MedGen UID:
632176
Concept ID:
C0460139
Finding
15.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
17.

Sporadic

Cases of the disease in question occur without a previous family history, i.e., as isolated cases without being transmitted from a parent and without other siblings being affected. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
342827
Concept ID:
C1853237
Finding
18.

Unrelated

Not connected or associated e.g. by kinship. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
99027
Concept ID:
C0445356
Finding
19.

Frequent

Coming at short intervals or in great quantities. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87144
Concept ID:
C0332183
Temporal Concept
20.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia

An autosomal dominant inherited neoplastic syndrome characterized by the development of various endocrine neoplasms and abnormalities in various anatomic sites. There are three types recognized: type 1 (MEN 1), caused by inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene MEN-1, type 2A (MEN 2A), caused by mutation of the RET gene, and type 2B (MEN 2B) also caused by mutation of the RET gene. Patients with MEN 1 may develop hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid gland adenomas, pituitary gland adenomas, pancreatic islet cell neoplasms, and carcinoid tumors. Patients with MEN 2A develop medullary thyroid carcinomas, and may also develop pheochromocytomas and parathyroid gland hyperplasia. Patients with MEN 2B develop medullary thyroid carcinomas and numerous neural defects including neuromas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45036
Concept ID:
C0027662
Neoplastic Process
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center