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Items: 17

1.

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including . - Heart failure . - Abnormal heart rhythms . - Heart valve problems. - Sudden cardiac arrest. Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
209232
Concept ID:
C0878544
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Cardiomyopathies

MedGen UID:
881076
Concept ID:
CN236666
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cardiovascular Diseases

MedGen UID:
881028
Concept ID:
CN236672
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Aortic valve stenosis

The presence of a stenosis (narrowing) of the aortic valve. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504892
Concept ID:
CN001503
Finding
6.

Cardiomyopathy

A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504883
Concept ID:
CN001491
Finding
7.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, autosomal recessive, cardiac valvular form

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect the connective tissues that support the skin, bones, blood vessels, and many other organs and tissues. Defects in connective tissues cause the signs and symptoms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which vary from mildly loose joints to life-threatening complications.Previously, there were more than 10 recognized types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, differentiated by Roman numerals. In 1997, researchers proposed a simpler classification that reduced the number of major types to six and gave them descriptive names: the classical type (formerly types I and II), the hypermobility type (formerly type III), the vascular type (formerly type IV), the kyphoscoliosis type (formerly type VIA), the arthrochalasia type (formerly types VIIA and VIIB), and the dermatosparaxis type (formerly type VIIC). This six-type classification, known as the Villefranche nomenclature, is still commonly used. The types are distinguished by their signs and symptoms, their underlying genetic causes, and their patterns of inheritance. Since 1997, several additional forms of the condition have been described. These additional forms appear to be rare, affecting a small number of families, and most have not been well characterized.Although all types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome affect the joints and skin, additional features vary by type. An unusually large range of joint movement (hypermobility) occurs with most forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, particularly the hypermobility type. Infants with hypermobile joints often have weak muscle tone, which can delay the development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. The loose joints are unstable and prone to dislocation and chronic pain. Hypermobility and dislocations of both hips at birth are characteristic features in infants with the arthrochalasia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.Many people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have soft, velvety skin that is highly stretchy (elastic) and fragile. Affected individuals tend to bruise easily, and some types of the condition also cause abnormal scarring. People with the classical form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience wounds that split open with little bleeding and leave scars that widen over time to create characteristic "cigarette paper" scars. The dermatosparaxis type of the disorder is characterized by skin that sags and wrinkles. Extra (redundant) folds of skin may be present as affected children get older.Some forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, notably the vascular type and to a lesser extent the kyphoscoliosis and classical types, can involve serious and potentially life-threatening complications due to unpredictable tearing (rupture) of blood vessels. This rupture can cause internal bleeding, stroke, and shock. The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of organ rupture, including tearing of the intestine and rupture of the uterus (womb) during pregnancy. People with the kyphoscoliosis form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experience severe, progressive curvature of the spine that can interfere with breathing.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
347359
Concept ID:
C1857034
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Infantile cortical hyperostosis

Caffey disease is characterized by massive subperiosteal new bone formation (usually involving the diaphyses of the long bones as well as the ribs, mandible, scapulae, and clavicles) typically associated with fever, joint swelling, and pain in children, with onset around age two months and spontaneous resolution by age two years. On rare occasion, the hyperostosis can be detected by ultrasound examination late in the third trimester of pregnancy. Limited follow-up information suggests that adults who had Caffey disease in childhood may manifest joint laxity, skin hyperextensibility, hernias, and an increased risk for bone fractures and/or deformities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
43781
Concept ID:
C0020497
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Aortic valve stenosis

constriction in the opening of the aortic valve or of the supravalvular or subvalvular regions. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
1621
Concept ID:
C0003507
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome

Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune defects, and a predisposition to malignancy. Chromosomal breakage is a feature. AT cells are abnormally sensitive to killing by ionizing radiation (IR), and abnormally resistant to inhibition of DNA synthesis by ionizing radiation. The latter trait has been used to identify complementation groups for the classic form of the disease (Jaspers et al., 1988). At least 4 of these (A, C, D, and E) map to chromosome 11q23 (Sanal et al., 1990) and are associated with mutations in the ATM gene. [from NCBI]

MedGen UID:
439
Concept ID:
C0004135
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
11.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Idiopathic cardiomyopathy

Disease of the heart muscle associated with electrical or mechanical dysfunction, in which the heart is the sole or predominantly involved organ. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
18634
Concept ID:
C0033141
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Heart failure

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should. It can affect one or both sides of the heart. The weakening of the heart's pumping ability causes. -Blood and fluid to back up into the lungs. -The buildup of fluid in the feet, ankles and legs - called edema. -Tiredness and shortness of breath. Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have had a heart attack. Men have a higher rate of heart failure than women. Your doctor will diagnose heart failure by doing a physical exam and heart tests. Treatment includes treating the underlying cause of your heart failure, medicines, and heart transplantation if other treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6749
Concept ID:
C0018801
Disease or Syndrome
14.

cardiac valvular disease

Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing backward. But sometimes they don't work properly. If they don't, you could have. -Regurgitation - when blood leaks back through the valve in the wrong direction. -Mitral valve prolapse - when one of the valves, the mitral valve, has floppy flaps and doesn't close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. -Stenosis - when the valve doesn't open enough and blocks blood flow. Valve problems can be present at birth or caused by infections, heart attacks, or heart disease or damage. The main sign of heart valve disease is an unusual heartbeat sound called a heart murmur. Your doctor can hear a heart murmur with a stethoscope. But many people have heart murmurs without having a problem. Heart tests can show if you have a heart valve disease. Some valve problems are minor and do not need treatment. Others might require medicine, medical procedures, or surgery to repair or replace the valve. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5463
Concept ID:
C0018824
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Cardiomegaly

Increased size of the heart. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
5459
Concept ID:
C0018800
Finding
16.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:. - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Primary dilated cardiomyopathy

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2880
Concept ID:
C0007193
Disease or Syndrome
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