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1.

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances release calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of calcium from the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience: acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some affected individuals will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9867
Concept ID:
C0024591
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Malignant hyperthermia

Malignant hyperthermia is characterized by a rapid increase in temperature to 39-42 degrees C in response to inhalational anesthetics such as halothane or to muscle relaxants such as succinylcholine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505071
Concept ID:
CN001851
Finding
3.

Central core disease

Central core disease (CCD) is characterized by muscle weakness ranging from mild to severe. Most affected individuals have mild disease with symmetric proximal muscle weakness and variable involvement of facial and neck muscles. The extraocular muscles are often spared. Motor development is usually delayed, but in general, most affected individuals acquire independent ambulation. Life span is usually normal. Severe disease is early in onset with profound hypotonia often accompanied by poor fetal movement, spinal deformities, hip dislocation, joint contractures, poor suck, and respiratory insufficiency requiring assisted ventilation. The outcome ranges from death in infancy to survival beyond age five years. The weakness in CCD is not typically progressive. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
199773
Concept ID:
C0751951
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Central

Applies to an abnormality that is located close to the median plane or midline of the body or of the referenced structure. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
59958
Concept ID:
C0205099
Spatial Concept
5.

Fever

A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make it harder for them to survive. Fever also activates your body's immune system. Infections cause most fevers. There can be many other causes, including. - Medicines. - Heat exhaustion. - Cancers. - Autoimmune diseases. Treatment depends on the cause of your fever. Your health care provider may recommend using over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lower a very high fever. Adults can also take aspirin, but children with fevers should not take aspirin. It is also important to drink enough liquids to prevent dehydration.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5169
Concept ID:
C0015967
Sign or Symptom
6.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Temporal Concept
7.

Ryanodine

binds to and inhibits the calcium-sensitive calcium channel of muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum and homologous organelles in other cell types, blocking the fast calcium release step in intracellular signal transduction. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
48522
Concept ID:
C0035983
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Contraction

MedGen UID:
685783
Concept ID:
C1140999
Pathologic Function
9.

Myopathy, centronuclear, 1

Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy is a congenital myopathy characterized by slowly progressive muscular weakness and wasting (Bitoun et al., 2005). The disorder involves mainly limb girdle, trunk, and neck muscles but may also affect distal muscles. Weakness may be present during childhood or adolescence or may not become evident until the third decade of life, and some affected individuals become wheelchair-bound in their fifties. Ptosis and limitation of eye movements occur frequently. The most prominent histopathologic features include high frequency of centrally located nuclei in a large number of extrafusal muscle fibers (which is the basis of the name of the disorder), radial arrangement of sarcoplasmic strands around the central nuclei, and predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers. Genetic Heterogeneity of Centronuclear Myopathy Centronuclear myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also X-linked CNM (CNMX; 310400), caused by mutation in the MTM1 gene (300415) on chromosome Xq28; CNM2 (255200), caused by mutation in the BIN1 gene (601248) on chromosome 2q14; CNM3 (614408), caused by mutation in the MYF6 gene (159991) on chromosome 12q21; CNM4 (614807), caused by mutation in the CCDC78 gene (614666) on chromosome 16p13; and CNM5 (615959), caused by mutation in the SPEG gene (615950) on chromosome 2q35. In addition, some patients with mutation in the RYR1 gene (180901) have findings of centronuclear myopathy on skeletal muscle biopsy (see 255320). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
322437
Concept ID:
C1834558
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Severe X-linked myotubular myopathy

X-linked centronuclear myopathy (XLCNM) (also known as myotubular myopathy [MTM]) is characterized by muscle weakness that ranges from severe to mild. Severe (classic) XLCNM presents prenatally with polyhydramnios and decreased fetal movement and in newborns with weakness, hypotonia, and respiratory distress. Affected males have significantly delayed motor milestones and most fail to achieve independent ambulation. Weakness is profound and often involves facial and extraocular muscles. Respiratory failure is nearly uniform, with most affected individuals requiring 24-hour ventilatory assistance. A minority of males with severe XLCNM die in infancy. Males with moderate XLCNM achieve motor milestones more quickly than males with the severe form; about 40% require no ventilator support or intermittent support. Males with mild XLCNM may require ventilatory support only in the newborn period; they have minimally delayed motor milestones, are able to walk, and may lack myopathic facies. The muscle disease of XLCNM is not obviously progressive. Female carriers of XLCNM are generally asymptomatic, although rare manifesting heterozygotes have been described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98374
Concept ID:
C0410203
Congenital Abnormality
11.

Cleidocranial dysostosis

Cleidocranial dysplasia (referred to as CCD in this review) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by delayed closure of the cranial sutures, hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, and multiple dental abnormalities. Manifestations may vary among individuals in the same family. The most prominent clinical findings are abnormally large, wide-open fontanels at birth that may remain open throughout life; mid-face retrusion; abnormal dentition, including delayed eruption of secondary dentition, failure to shed the primary teeth, supernumerary teeth with dental crowding, and malocclusion; clavicular hypoplasia resulting in narrow, sloping shoulders that can be apposed at the midline; and hand abnormalities such as brachydactyly, tapering fingers, and short, broad thumbs. Individuals with CCD are shorter than their unaffected sibs and are more likely to have other skeletal/orthopedic problems such as pes planus, genu valgum, and scoliosis. Other medical problems include recurrent sinus infections and other upper-airway complications, recurrent ear infections, high incidence of cesarean section, and mild degree of motor delay in children under age five years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3486
Concept ID:
C0008928
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Congenital Structural Myopathy

A heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by the early onset of hypotonia, developmental delay of motor skills, non-progressive weakness. Each of these disorders is associated with a specific histologic muscle fiber abnormality. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
156050
Concept ID:
C0752282
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Clinical finding

clinical manifestations that can be either objective when observed by a physician, or subjective when perceived by the patient. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
19974
Concept ID:
C0037088
Sign or Symptom
14.

Second Messenger Systems

A non-proteinaceous signaling molecule that is generated by intracellular enzymes that respond to the binding of extracellular ligands to cell surface receptors. These compounds serve as intermediate signals for a diverse set of cellular processes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
19914
Concept ID:
C0036522
Molecular Function
15.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Disorder of musculoskeletal system

A category of diseases that involve muscles and bones. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
6471
Concept ID:
C0026857
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Calcium

You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. . It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include dairy products such as milk, cheese and yogurt, and leafy, green vegetables. The exact amount of calcium you need depends on your age and other factors. Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than young adults. Older women need plenty of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. People who do not eat enough high-calcium foods should take a calcium supplement. NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
710
Concept ID:
C0006675
Biologically Active Substance; Element, Ion, or Isotope; Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Abnormality of temperature regulation

An abnormality of temperature homeostasis. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
626
Concept ID:
C0005904
Sign or Symptom
20.

Blood clotting factor

Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
605
Concept ID:
C0005789
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
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