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Items: 10

1.

Cone dysfunction syndrome

Retinal phenotype characterised by cone photoreceptor dysfunction and preserved rod system. The abnormality is typically stationary or very slowly progressive and findings may include reduced central vision, colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
850784
Concept ID:
C0543968
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Optic nerve hypoplasia

A congenital abnormality characterized by the underdevelopment of the optic nerve. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
137901
Concept ID:
C0338502
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Deuteranopia

Normal color vision in humans is trichromatic, being based on 3 classes of cone that are maximally sensitive to light at approximately 420 nm (blue cones; 613522), 530 nm (green cones; 300821), and 560 nm (red cones; 300822). Comparison by neural circuits of light absorption by the 3 classes of cone photoreceptors allows perception of red, yellow, green, and blue colors individually or in various combinations. Dichromatic color vision is severely defective color vision based on the use of only 2 types of photoreceptors, blue plus green (protanopia; see 303900) or blue plus red (deuteranopia). Anomalous trichromacy is trichromatic color vision based on a blue, green, and an anomalous red-like photoreceptor (protanomaly), or a blue, red, and an anomalous green-like photoreceptor (deuteranomaly). The color vision defect is generally mild but may in certain cases be severe. Common variation in red-green color vision exists among both normal and color-deficient individuals (review by Deeb, 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
102324
Concept ID:
C0155016
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Protan defect

Normal color vision in humans is trichromatic, being based on 3 classes of cone that are maximally sensitive to light at approximately 420 nm (blue cones; 613522), 530 nm (green cones; 300821), and 560 nm (red cones; 300822). Comparison by neural circuits of light absorption by the 3 classes of cone photoreceptors allows perception of red, yellow, green, and blue colors individually or in various combinations. Dichromatic color vision is severely defective color vision based on the use of only 2 types of photoreceptors, blue plus green (protanopia) or blue plus red (deuteranopia; see 303800). Anomalous trichromacy is trichromatic color vision based on a blue, green, and an anomalous red-like photoreceptor (protanomaly), or a blue, red, and an anomalous green-like photoreceptor (deuteranomaly). The color vision defect is generally mild but may in certain cases be severe. Common variation in red-green color vision exists among both normal and color-deficient individuals (review by Deeb, 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56350
Concept ID:
C0155015
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Achromatopsia

Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The symptoms are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57751
Concept ID:
C0152200
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Myopia 8

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a refractive error of the eye. Light rays from a distant object are focused in front of the retina and those from a near object are focused in the retina; therefore distant objects are blurry and near objects are clear (summary by Kaiser et al., 2004). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to myopia, see 160700. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
332223
Concept ID:
C1836505
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Myopia 5, autosomal dominant

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a refractive error of the eye. Light rays from a distant object are focused in front of the retina and those from a near object are focused in the retina; therefore distant objects are blurry and near objects are clear (summary by Kaiser et al., 2004). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to myopia, see (160700). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
324913
Concept ID:
C1837972
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Myopia 6

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a refractive error of the eye. Light rays from a distant object are focused in front of the retina and those from a near object are focused in the retina; therefore distant objects are blurry and near objects are clear (summary by Kaiser et al., 2004). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to myopia, see 160700. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
324696
Concept ID:
C1837148
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Iris hypopigmentation

An abnormal reduction in the amount of pigmentation of the iris. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
509721
Concept ID:
C0154920
Finding; Finding
10.

Abnormal iris pigmentation

Abnormal pigmentation of the iris. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
331733
Concept ID:
C1834387
Finding
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