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Items: 1 to 20 of 21

1.

Proportionate short stature; mild intellectual disability; dysmorphic facial features; precocious puberty

MedGen UID:
850705
Concept ID:
CN231399
Finding
2.

Pseudoachondroplastic spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia syndrome

Pseudoachondroplasia is characterized by normal length at birth and normal facies. Often the presenting feature is a waddling gait, recognized at the onset of walking. Typically, the growth rate falls below the standard growth curve by approximately age two years, leading to a moderately severe form of disproportionate short-limb short stature. Joint pain during childhood, particularly in the large joints of the lower extremities, is common. Degenerative joint disease is progressive; approximately 50% of individuals with pseudoachondroplasia eventually require hip replacement surgery. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98378
Concept ID:
C0410538
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hypochondroplasia

Hypochondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature; stocky build; disproportionately short arms and legs; broad, short hands and feet; mild joint laxity; and macrocephaly. Radiologic features include shortening of long bones with mild metaphyseal flare; narrowing of the inferior lumbar interpedicular distances; short, broad femoral neck; and squared, shortened ilia. The skeletal features are very similar to those seen in achondroplasia but tend to be milder. Medical complications common to achondroplasia (e.g., spinal stenosis, tibial bowing, obstructive apnea) occur less frequently in hypochondroplasia but intellectual disability and epilepsy may be more prevalent. Children usually present as toddlers or school-age children with decreased growth velocity leading to short stature and limb disproportion. Other features also become more prominent over time. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98376
Concept ID:
C0410529
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Osteogenesis imperfecta

COL1A1/2-related osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by fractures with minimal or absent trauma, variable dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), and, in adult years, hearing loss. The clinical features of COL1A1/2-related OI represent a continuum ranging from perinatal lethality to individuals with severe skeletal deformities, mobility impairments, and very short stature to nearly asymptomatic individuals with a mild predisposition to fractures, normal dentition, normal stature, and normal life span. Fractures can occur in any bone, but are most common in the extremities. DI is characterized by grey or brown teeth that may appear translucent and wear down and break easily. COL1A1/2-related OI has been classified into four types (I, II, III, and IV) based on clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This classification system can be helpful in providing information about prognosis and management for a given individual. The four OI types are now referred to as follows: OI type I: classic non-deforming OI with blue sclerae. OI type II: perinatally lethal OI. OI type III: progressively deforming OI. OI type IV: common variable OI with normal sclerae. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
45246
Concept ID:
C0029434
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia characterized by disproportionate short stature (short trunk), abnormal epiphyses, and flattened vertebral bodies. Skeletal features are manifested at birth and evolve with time. Other features include myopia and/or retinal degeneration with retinal detachment and cleft palate (summary by Anderson et al., 1990). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20916
Concept ID:
C0038015
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
6.

Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is the most common process resulting in disproportionate small stature. Affected individuals have short arms and legs, a large head, and characteristic facial features with frontal bossing and midface retrusion (formerly known as midface hypoplasia). In infancy, hypotonia is typical, and acquisition of developmental motor milestones is often both aberrant in pattern and delayed. Intelligence and life span are usually near normal, although craniocervical junction compression increases the risk of death in infancy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1289
Concept ID:
C0001080
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
7.

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia

A disorder of bone growth affecting the vertebrae and the ends of the long bones (epiphyses). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505319
Concept ID:
CN002414
Finding
8.

Growth control, Y-chromosome influenced

MedGen UID:
358267
Concept ID:
C1868676
Finding
9.

Thoracomelic dysplasia

MedGen UID:
336441
Concept ID:
C1848863
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Short stature

Height greater than two standard deviations below the mean of the appropriate reference population for the age and sex of the individual. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
11.

Osteogenesis imperfecta type I

COL1A1/2-related osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by fractures with minimal or absent trauma, variable dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), and, in adult years, hearing loss. The clinical features of COL1A1/2-related OI represent a continuum ranging from perinatal lethality to individuals with severe skeletal deformities, mobility impairments, and very short stature to nearly asymptomatic individuals with a mild predisposition to fractures, normal dentition, normal stature, and normal life span. Fractures can occur in any bone, but are most common in the extremities. DI is characterized by grey or brown teeth that may appear translucent and wear down and break easily. COL1A1/2-related OI has been classified into four types (I, II, III, and IV) based on clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This classification system can be helpful in providing information about prognosis and management for a given individual. The four OI types are now referred to as follows: OI type I: classic non-deforming OI with blue sclerae. OI type II: perinatally lethal OI. OI type III: progressively deforming OI. OI type IV: common variable OI with normal sclerae. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9799
Concept ID:
C0023931
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Multiple congenital anomalies

Congenital abnormalities that affect more than one organ or body structure. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7806
Concept ID:
C0000772
Congenital Abnormality
14.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Dwarfism

A dwarf is a person of short stature - under 4' 10 as an adult. More than 200 different conditions can cause dwarfism. A single type, called achondroplasia, causes about 70 percent of all dwarfism. Achondroplasia is a genetic condition that affects about 1 in 15,000 to 1 in 40,000 people. It makes your arms and legs short in comparison to your head and trunk. Other genetic conditions, kidney disease and problems with metabolism or hormones can also cause short stature. Dwarfism itself is not a disease. However, there is a greater risk of some health problems. With proper medical care, most people with dwarfism have active lives and live as long as other people.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3931
Concept ID:
C0013336
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
16.

Osteogenesis imperfecta, type VI

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Osteogenesis imperfecta type VI is a severe autosomal recessive form of the disorder (Glorieux et al., 2002; Becker et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
481194
Concept ID:
C3279564
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Osteogenesis imperfecta type 12

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. OI type XII is an autosomal recessive form characterized by recurrent fractures, mild bone deformations, generalized osteoporosis, delayed teeth eruption, no dentinogenesis imperfecta, normal hearing, and white sclerae (summary by Lapunzina et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462783
Concept ID:
C3151433
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Osteogenesis imperfecta, type XI

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. OI type XI is an autosomal recessive form of OI (summary by Alanay et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462568
Concept ID:
C3151218
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Osteogenesis imperfecta type 10

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. OI type X is an autosomal recessive form characterized by multiple bone deformities and fractures, generalized osteopenia, dentinogenesis imperfecta, and blue sclera (Christiansen et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462561
Concept ID:
C3151211
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Osteogenesis imperfecta type 8

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. Due to considerable phenotypic variability, Sillence et al. (1979) developed a classification of OI subtypes based on clinical features and disease severity: OI type I, with blue sclerae (166200); perinatal lethal OI type II, also known as congenital OI (166210); OI type III, a progressively deforming form with normal sclerae (259420); and OI type IV, with normal sclerae (166220). Most forms of OI are autosomal dominant with mutations in one of the 2 genes that code for type I collagen alpha chains, COL1A1 (120150) and COL1A2 (120160). Cabral et al. (2007) described a form of autosomal recessive OI, which they designated OI type VIII, characterized by white sclerae, severe growth deficiency, extreme skeletal undermineralization, and bulbous metaphyses. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
410075
Concept ID:
C1970458
Disease or Syndrome
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