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Items: 5

1.

Verrucae

Warts are growths on your skin caused by an infection with humanpapilloma virus, or HPV. Types of warts include . -Common warts, which often appear on your fingers . -Plantar warts, which show up on the soles of your feet . -Genital warts, which are a sexually transmitted disease . -Flat warts, which appear in places you shave frequently . In children, warts often go away on their own. In adults, they tend to stay. If they hurt or bother you, or if they multiply, you can remove them. Chemical skin treatments usually work. If not, various freezing, surgical and laser treatments can remove warts. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
777120
Concept ID:
C3665596
Finding; Neoplastic Process
2.

Pain

Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu. Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45282
Concept ID:
C0030193
Sign or Symptom
3.

Nevus

Moles are growths on the skin. They happen when pigment cells in the skin, called melanocytes, grow in clusters. Moles are very common. Most people have between 10 and 40 moles. A person may develop new moles from time to time, usually until about age 40. In older people, they tend to fade away. Moles are usually pink, tan or brown. They can be flat or raised. They are usually round or oval and no larger than a pencil eraser. About one out of every ten people has at least one unusual (or atypical) mole that looks different from an ordinary mole. They are called dysplastic nevi. They may be more likely than ordinary moles to develop into melanoma, a type of skin cancer. You should have a health care professional check your moles if they look unusual, grow larger, change in color or outline, or in any other way. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45074
Concept ID:
C0027960
Neoplastic Process
4.

Neoplasm of the skin

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. . Anyone can get skin cancer, but it is more common in people who . - Spend a lot of time in the sun or have been sunburned. - Have light-colored skin, hair and eyes. - Have a family member with skin cancer. - Are over age 50. You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and biologic therapy. PDT uses a drug and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
40101
Concept ID:
C0007114
Neoplastic Process
5.

Melanocytic nevus

A oval and round, colored (usually medium-to dark brown, reddish brown, or flesh colored) lesion. Typically, a melanocytic nevus is less than 6 mm in diameter, but may be much smaller or larger. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
14364
Concept ID:
C0027962
Neoplastic Process
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