Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 31

1.

Achalasia

Failure of the smooth muscle fibers of the gastrointestinal tract to relax at any one point of junction of one part with another. [from NCI_FDA]

MedGen UID:
230833
Concept ID:
C1321756
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Glucocorticoid deficiency with achalasia

Triple A syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by three specific features: achalasia, Addison disease, and alacrima. Achalasia is a disorder that affects the ability to move food through the esophagus, the tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach. It can lead to severe feeding difficulties and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Addison disease, also known as primary adrenal insufficiency, is caused by abnormal function of the small hormone-producing glands on top of each kidney (adrenal glands). The main features of Addison disease include fatigue, loss of appetite, weight loss, low blood pressure, and darkening of the skin. The third major feature of triple A syndrome is a reduced or absent ability to secrete tears (alacrima). Most people with triple A syndrome have all three of these features, although some have only two.Many of the features of triple A syndrome are caused by dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. This part of the nervous system controls involuntary body processes such as digestion, blood pressure, and body temperature. People with triple A syndrome often experience abnormal sweating, difficulty regulating blood pressure, unequal pupil size (anisocoria), and other signs and symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (dysautonomia).People with this condition may have other neurological abnormalities, such as developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech problems (dysarthria), and a small head size (microcephaly). In addition, affected individuals commonly experience muscle weakness, movement problems, and nerve abnormalities in their extremities (peripheral neuropathy). Some develop optic atrophy, which is the degeneration (atrophy) of the nerves that carry information from the eyes to the brain. Many of the neurological symptoms of triple A syndrome worsen over time.People with triple A syndrome frequently develop a thickening of the outer layer of skin (hyperkeratosis) on the palms of their hands and the soles of their feet. Other skin abnormalities may also be present in people with this condition.Alacrima is usually the first noticeable sign of triple A syndrome, as it becomes apparent early in life that affected children produce little or no tears while crying. They develop Addison disease and achalasia during childhood or adolescence, and most of the neurologic features of triple A syndrome begin during adulthood. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
82889
Concept ID:
C0271742
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Achalasia

A disorder of esophageal motility characterized by the inability of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax during swallowing and by inadequate or lacking peristalsis in the lower half of the body of the esophagus. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
5023
Concept ID:
C0014848
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Alacrima

Absence of tear secretion. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
87488
Concept ID:
C0344505
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Fibrosis

formation of excess fibrous connective tissue [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
5179
Concept ID:
C0016059
Pathologic Function
7.

Autosomal Recessive Disorder

An inherited disorder manifested only when two copies of a mutated gene are present. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
859582
Concept ID:
C3899988
Disease or Syndrome
8.

POLYARTERITIS NODOSA, CHILDHOOD-ONSET

MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Alacrima

Absence of tear secretion. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504477
Concept ID:
CN000488
Finding
11.

Staining (finding)

MedGen UID:
352872
Concept ID:
C1704680
Finding
12.

Autosomal recessive inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Genetic Function; Intellectual Product
13.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function
14.

Polyarteritis nodosa

Childhood-onset polyarteritis nodosa is an autosomal recessive systemic vascular inflammatory disorder characterized mainly by involvement of the skin, nervous system, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract. There is considerable variability in the severity and age at onset, although most patients have onset of symptoms in the first decade. Features include recurrent ischemic stroke affecting the small vessels of the brain and resulting in neurologic dysfunction, recurrent fever, elevated acute-phase proteins, myalgias, and livedo racemosa or reticularis with an inflammatory vasculitis on biopsy. Some patients develop hypertension, aneurysms, or ischemic necrosis of the digits (summary by Zhou et al., 2014 and Navon Elkan et al., 2014). Some patients present with clinical immunodeficiency (van Eyck et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
14681
Concept ID:
C0031036
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Increased lacrimation

Profuse lacrimation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57518
Concept ID:
C0152227
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
16.

Esophageal dysmotility

Disorders affecting the motor function of the UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; the ESOPHAGUS body, or a combination of these parts. The failure of the sphincters to maintain a tonic pressure may result in gastric reflux of food and acid into the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX). Other disorders include hypermotility (spastic disorders) and markedly increased amplitude in contraction (nutcracker esophagus). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
41868
Concept ID:
C0014858
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Dysphagia

If you have a swallowing disorder, you may have difficulty or pain when swallowing. Some people cannot swallow at all. Others may have trouble swallowing liquids, foods, or saliva. This makes it hard to eat. Often, it can be difficult to take in enough calories and fluids to nourish your body. Anyone can have a swallowing disorder, but it is more likely in the elderly. It often happens because of other conditions, including. - Nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and cerebral palsy. - Problems with your esophagus, including GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). - Stroke. - Head or spinal cord injury. - Cancer of the head, neck, or esophagus. Medicines can help some people, while others may need surgery. Swallowing treatment with a speech-language pathologist can help. You may find it helpful to change your diet or hold your head or neck in a certain way when you eat. In very serious cases, people may need feeding tubes. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41440
Concept ID:
C0011168
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disorder of gastrointestinal tract

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder that affects the gastrointestinal tract, anus, liver, biliary system, and pancreas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8970
Concept ID:
C0017178
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Disorder of esophagus

The esophagus is the tube that carries food, liquids and saliva from your mouth to the stomach. You may not be aware of your esophagus until you swallow something too large, too hot or too cold. You may also become aware of it when something is wrong. . The most common problem with the esophagus is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It happens when a band of muscle at the end of your esophagus does not close properly. This allows stomach contents to leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus and irritate it. Over time, GERD can cause damage to the esophagus. Other problems include heartburn and cancer. Treatment depends on the problem. Some get better with over-the-counter medicines or changes in diet. Others may need prescription medicines or surgery. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8693
Concept ID:
C0014852
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Megaesophagus

An abnormal dilation of the esophagus not due to obstruction. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
6286
Concept ID:
C0025164
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center