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Items: 18

1.

Cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency

Leigh syndrome (or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy) is characterized by decompensation (often with elevated lactate levels in blood and/or CSF) during an intercurrent illness. It is typically associated with psychomotor retardation or regression, often followed by transient or prolonged stabilization or even improvement, but inevitably resulting in eventual progressive neurologic decline, typically occurring in stepwise decrements. Neurologic manifestations include hypotonia, spasticity, movement disorders (including chorea), cerebellar ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Extraneurologic manifestations may include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hypertrichosis, anemia, renal tubulopathy, liver involvement, ptosis, and muscle weakness. Onset is typically between ages three and 12 months; about 50% of affected individuals die by age three years, most often as a result of respiratory or cardiac failure. Later onset (including in adulthood) and long-term survival may occasionally occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75662
Concept ID:
C0268237
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Position

The anatomical localization of the specified phenotypic abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
866377
Concept ID:
C4019252
Functional Concept; Spatial Concept
4.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Leigh syndrome, French Canadian type

The French Canadian type of Leigh syndrome is an autosomal recessive severe neurologic disorder with onset in infancy. Features include delayed psychomotor development, mental retardation, mild dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, ataxia, and the development of lesions in the brainstem and basal ganglia. Affected individuals tend to have episodic metabolic and/or neurologic crises in early childhood, which often lead to early death (summary by Debray et al., 2011). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Leigh syndrome, see 256000. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
387801
Concept ID:
C1857355
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Mode of inheritance

The manner in which a genetic trait or disorder is passed from one generation to the next. Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, X-linked recessive, multifactorial, and mitochondrial inheritance are examples. Each mode of inheritance results in a characteristic pattern of affected and unaffected family members. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
353811
Concept ID:
C1708511
Functional Concept; Genetic Function
7.

Mitochondrial inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Because the mitochondrial genome is essentially always maternally inherited, a mitochondrial condition can only be transmitted by females, although the condition can affect both sexes. The proportion of mutant mitochondria can vary (heteroplasmy). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
165802
Concept ID:
C0887941
Genetic Function
8.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function; Qualitative Concept
9.

Leigh syndrome

Leigh syndrome is an early-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a characteristic neuropathology consisting of focal, bilateral lesions in one or more areas of the central nervous system, including the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions are areas of demyelination, gliosis, necrosis, spongiosis, or capillary proliferation. Clinical symptoms depend on which areas of the central nervous system are involved. The most common underlying cause is a defect in oxidative phosphorylation (Dahl, 1998). Leigh syndrome may be a feature of a deficiency of any of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes: complex I deficiency (252010), complex II deficiency (252011), complex III deficiency (124000), complex IV deficiency (cytochrome c oxidase; 220110), or complex V deficiency (604273). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44095
Concept ID:
C0023264
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Mitochondrial diseases

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155901
Concept ID:
C0751651
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases

A collective term for nutritional disorders resulting from poor absorption or nutritional imbalance, and metabolic disorders resulting from defects in biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) or breakdown (CATABOLISM) of endogenous substances. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45164
Concept ID:
C0028715
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Heredity

The transmission of traits encoded in GENES from parent to offspring. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6814
Concept ID:
C0019266
Molecular Function
15.

Inborn error of metabolism

Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6323
Concept ID:
C0025521
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
16.

Leigh Syndrome due to Mitochondrial Complex IV Deficiency

MedGen UID:
338082
Concept ID:
C1850599
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Leigh Syndrome (mtDNA mutation)

Leigh syndrome is a severe neurological disorder that usually becomes apparent in the first year of life. This condition is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities (psychomotor regression) and typically results in death within two to three years, usually due to respiratory failure. A small number of individuals do not develop symptoms until adulthood or have symptoms that worsen more slowly.The first signs of Leigh syndrome seen in infancy are usually vomiting, diarrhea, and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), which disrupts eating. These problems often result in an inability to grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Severe muscle and movement problems are common in Leigh syndrome. Affected individuals may develop weak muscle tone (hypotonia), involuntary muscle contractions (dystonia), and problems with movement and balance (ataxia). Loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy), common in people with Leigh syndrome, may also make movement difficult.Several other features may occur in people with Leigh syndrome. Many individuals with this condition develop weakness or paralysis of the muscles that move the eyes (ophthalmoparesis); rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus); or degeneration of the nerves that carry information from the eyes to the brain (optic atrophy). Severe breathing problems are common, and these problems can worsen until they cause acute respiratory failure. Some affected individuals develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is a thickening of the heart muscle that forces the heart to work harder to pump blood. In addition, a substance called lactate can build up in the body, and excessive amounts are often found in the blood, urine, or the fluid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord (cerebrospinal fluid) of people with Leigh syndrome.The signs and symptoms of Leigh syndrome are caused in part by patches of damaged tissue (lesions) that develop in the brains of people with this condition. A medical procedure called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals characteristic lesions in certain regions of the brain. These regions include the basal ganglia, which help control movement; the cerebellum, which controls the ability to balance and coordinates movement; and the brainstem, which connects the brain to the spinal cord and controls functions such as swallowing and breathing. The brain lesions are often accompanied by loss of the myelin coating around nerves (demyelination), which reduces the ability of the nerves to activate muscles used for movement or relay sensory information from the rest of the body back to the brain.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
833803
Concept ID:
CN230159
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Cytochrome c oxidase i deficiency

MedGen UID:
433471
Concept ID:
CN069330
Disease or Syndrome
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