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1.

Bipolar affective disorder

Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go from very happy, up, and active to very sad and hopeless, down, and inactive, and then back again. They often have normal moods in between. The up feeling is called mania. The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. Abnormal brain structure and function may also play a role. Bipolar disorder often starts in a person's late teen or early adult years. But children and adults can have bipolar disorder too. The illness usually lasts a lifetime. If you think you may have it, tell your health care provider. A medical checkup can rule out other illnesses that might cause your mood changes. If not treated, bipolar disorder can lead to damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. However, there are effective treatments to control symptoms: medicine and talk therapy. A combination usually works best. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2649
Concept ID:
C0005586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Bipolar

MedGen UID:
912721
Concept ID:
CN244029
Finding
3.

Major affective disorder 1

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior. This disorder most often appears in late adolescence or early adulthood, although symptoms can begin at any time of life.People with bipolar disorder experience both dramatic "highs," called manic episodes, and "lows," called depressive episodes. These episodes can last from hours to weeks, and many people have no symptoms between episodes. Manic episodes are characterized by increased energy and activity, irritability, restlessness, an inability to sleep, and reckless behavior. Depressive episodes are marked by low energy and activity, a feeling of hopelessness, and an inability to perform everyday tasks. People with bipolar disorder often have repeated thoughts of death and suicide, and they have a much greater risk of dying by suicide than the general population.Manic and depressive episodes can include psychotic symptoms, such as false perceptions (hallucinations) or strongly held false beliefs (delusions). Mixed episodes, which have features of manic and depressive episodes at the same time, also occur in some affected individuals.Bipolar disorder often occurs with other mental health conditions, including anxiety disorders (such as panic attacks), behavioral disorders (such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), and substance abuse.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
377615
Concept ID:
C1852197
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Mania

A state of abnormally elevated or irritable mood, arousal, and or energy levels. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
137909
Concept ID:
C0338831
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
Organism Function
6.

Postpartum psychosis

MedGen UID:
891629
Concept ID:
CN237664
Finding
7.

Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
851585
Concept ID:
C1548428
Finding
8.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
9.

Psychotic episodes

MedGen UID:
90930
Concept ID:
C0338614
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
10.

History of

A record of a patient's background regarding health and the occurrence of disease events of the individual. In addition, personal medical history may be a variable in epidemiologic studies. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
82657
Concept ID:
C0262926
Finding
11.

Family history

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed. . You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful. . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69143
Concept ID:
C0241889
Finding
12.

Psychosis

Psychotic disorders are severe mental disorders that cause abnormal thinking and perceptions. People with psychoses lose touch with reality. Two of the main symptoms are delusions and hallucinations. Delusions are false beliefs, such as thinking that someone is plotting against you or that the TV is sending you secret messages. Hallucinations are false perceptions, such as hearing, seeing, or feeling something that is not there. Schizophrenia is one type of psychotic disorder. People with bipolar disorder may also have psychotic symptoms. Other problems that can cause psychosis include alcohol and some drugs, brain tumors, brain infections, and stroke. Treatment depends on the cause of the psychosis. It might involve drugs to control symptoms and talk therapy. Hospitalization is an option for serious cases where a person might be dangerous to himself or others.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
19568
Concept ID:
C0033975
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Bipolar and Related Disorders

These disorders are related to both SCHIZOPHRENIA SPECTRUM AND RELATED DISORDERS and DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS in terms of symptomatology, family history, and genetics. (DSM-V) . [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
875788
Concept ID:
C4042924
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
14.

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications

Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT, the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE), and disorders related to PREGNANCY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318565
Concept ID:
C1720765
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders

Marked disorders of thought (delusions, hallucinations, or other thought disorder accompanied by disordered affect or behavior), and deterioration from a previous level of functioning. Individuals have one o more of the following symptoms: delusions, hallucinations, and disorganized speech. (from DSM-5) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
141907
Concept ID:
C0525046
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
17.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
18.

Mood disorder

Most people feel sad or irritable from time to time. They may say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional state. Nearly one in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also called manic depression). Mood disorders can increase a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases. Treatments include medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of both. With treatment, most people with mood disorders can lead productive lives.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99866
Concept ID:
C0525045
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
19.

Depression, Neurotic

A term used for any state of depression that is not psychotic. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
76370
Concept ID:
C0282126
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Postpartum depression

Many women have the baby blues after childbirth. If you have the baby blues, you may have mood swings, feel sad, anxious or overwhelmed, have crying spells, lose your appetite, or have trouble sleeping. The baby blues most often go away within a few days or a week. The symptoms are not severe and do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may also feel hopeless and worthless, and lose interest in the baby. You may have thoughts of hurting yourself or the baby. Very rarely, new mothers develop something even more serious. They may have hallucinations or try to hurt themselves or the baby. They need to get treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after childbirth. The cause is not known. Hormonal and physical changes after birth and the stress of caring for a new baby may play a role. Women who have had depression are at higher risk. If you think you have postpartum depression, tell your health care provider. Medicines, including antidepressants and talk therapy can help you get well. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
66359
Concept ID:
C0221074
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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