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1.

Respiratory syncytial virus infection

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can cause serious problems in young babies, including pneumonia and severe breathing problems. Premature babies and those with other health problems have the highest risk. A child with RSV may have a fever, stuffy nose, cough, and trouble breathing. Lab tests can tell if your child has the virus. There is no specific treatment. You should give your child fluids to prevent dehydration. If needed, you can also give a pain reliever (not aspirin) for fever and headache. RSV easily spreads from person to person. You can get it from direct contact with someone who has it or by touching infected objects such as toys or surfaces such as countertops. Washing your hands often and not sharing eating and drinking utensils are simple ways to help prevent the spread of RSV infection. There is currently no vaccine for RSV. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
48424
Concept ID:
C0035235
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects your airways. Your airways are tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. If you have asthma, the inside walls of your airways become sore and swollen. That makes them very sensitive, and they may react strongly to things that you are allergic to or find irritating. When your airways react, they get narrower and your lungs get less air. Symptoms of asthma include. -Wheezing. -Coughing, especially early in the morning or at night. -Chest tightness. -Shortness of breath. Not all people who have asthma have these symptoms. Having these symptoms doesn't always mean that you have asthma. Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. You may also have allergy tests. When your asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it's called an asthma attack. Severe asthma attacks may require emergency care, and they can be fatal. Asthma is treated with two kinds of medicines: quick-relief medicines to stop asthma symptoms and long-term control medicines to prevent symptoms. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2109
Concept ID:
C0004096
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
4.

Bronchomoniliasis

MedGen UID:
737485
Concept ID:
C1622369
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cheese-makers asthma

MedGen UID:
729880
Concept ID:
C1321272
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Severe asthma

MedGen UID:
663935
Concept ID:
C0581126
Finding
7.

Prolonged

MedGen UID:
615082
Concept ID:
C0439590
Temporal Concept
8.

Furriers lung

MedGen UID:
538594
Concept ID:
C0264476
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Coffee-workers lung

MedGen UID:
538589
Concept ID:
C0264468
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Meat-wrappers asthma

MedGen UID:
536788
Concept ID:
C0238266
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Cheese-washers lung

MedGen UID:
507549
Concept ID:
C0007969
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Asthma

Asthma is characterized by increased responsiveness of the tracheobronchial tree to multiple stimuli, leading to narrowing of the air passages with resultant dyspnea, cough, and wheezing. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505101
Concept ID:
CN001900
Finding
13.

Chronic

Slow, creeping onset, slow progress and long continuance of disease manifestations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
Temporal Concept
14.

Severe

Having a high degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between four and five standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
Qualitative Concept
15.

Aicardi Goutieres syndrome

Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
97953
Concept ID:
C0393591
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Disease due to Paramyxoviridae

Infections with viruses of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. This includes MORBILLIVIRUS INFECTIONS; RESPIROVIRUS INFECTIONS; PNEUMOVIRUS INFECTIONS; HENIPAVIRUS INFECTIONS; AVULAVIRUS INFECTIONS; and RUBULAVIRUS INFECTIONS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
104899
Concept ID:
C0206613
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Injectables

A drug or medicine that can be injected [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
88572
Concept ID:
C0086466
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Mononegavirales Infections

Infections with viruses of the order MONONEGAVIRALES. The concept includes FILOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PARAMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; and RHABDOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67005
Concept ID:
C0242916
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Disease due to Pneumovirus

Infections with viruses of the genus PNEUMOVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. This includes RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTIONS, an important cause of respiratory disease in humans. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
61643
Concept ID:
C0206615
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Viral disease

Viruses are capsules with genetic material inside. They are very tiny, much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers. . Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This eventually kills the cells, which can make you sick. Viral infections are hard to treat because viruses live inside your body's cells. They are protected from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
53027
Concept ID:
C0042769
Disease or Syndrome
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